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luke
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Senior Member
United States
Joined 4671 days ago

3138 posts - 1257 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 49 of 92
17 December 2012 at 11:18pm | IP Logged 
Listened to episodes 3, 4, and the first half of 5 in Pasaporto in the background.

With Jen Nia Mondo I read lesson 7 and dialogue 8 and listened to dialogues 6-8.

Edited by luke on 17 December 2012 at 11:24pm



luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4671 days ago

3138 posts - 1257 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 50 of 92
29 December 2012 at 8:11am | IP Logged 
I haven't done much with Pasaporto al la Tuta Mondo over the last week or so, but with Jen Nia Mondo, I'm into lessons 10-12. Generally I've been listening to the dialogues and reading the book, including the notes and exercises. For lesson 10, I also listened to the lesson, which matches the book pretty closely, but which lacks some of the exercises. I got off the Pasaporto track over the holidays and am thinking I'll just focus on JNM for this second trip through the course.



luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4671 days ago

3138 posts - 1257 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 51 of 92
05 January 2013 at 1:05pm | IP Logged 
I continue on the Jen nia Mondo track, listening mostly to dialogues, rather than lessons most days, although
I did listen to lesson 11 again yesterday. I've been reading dialogues and a lesson or two most days,
although this sort of study doesn't take too long.

I was calculating in my head my Esperanto study time and I think it averages out to 15 minutes or so per
day. That time is not entirely focused as I may be driving or at work on break. Generally I'm only speaking
out loud in the car when I semi-shadow a lesson.

I think I may have sped up my recordings a bit some years ago and now I regret that. If I recall correctly I
sped them up twice. I know I've backed out one of the speed ups that had the lessons gong some obnoxious
40 percent faster than the original, but I think they are still sped up 20 percent. I was trying to save time. The
faster recordings are more difficult to shadow properly. Penny wise and pound foolish. I still have the original
CDs, so I can rerip them, but that is a hassle and one of the CDs skips now.

I plan to just march forward. The goal isn't really to master the course, but rather to speak and understand
the language.

Edited by luke on 05 January 2013 at 1:05pm



luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4671 days ago

3138 posts - 1257 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 52 of 92
09 January 2013 at 4:52pm | IP Logged 
On the Jen Nia Mondo track, which has been the only track for a couple of weeks, I've been reading and listening to lessons and dialogues. Yesterday, I read the dialogues and notes for lessons 11-14. I listened to lessons 13 and 14 (of 25). I've been tempted to start another track, but think it's more sensible to just finish up this second, more thorough trip through Jen Nia Mondo. At the current pace, that may take about a month



luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4671 days ago

3138 posts - 1257 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 53 of 92
12 January 2013 at 11:30am | IP Logged 
Here it is just a few days later and I have started another track. Teach Yourself Esperanto is good book I got a few years ago along with the casette. I'm doing the fast track again. I went through unit 3 (of 15) this morning. This is a book where the dialogues get much longer as the book goes on. The first 2 units were very easy, but there were a couple of new vocabulary items. The book has some drawings of the family, home, urbo, k.t.p. These are helpful for bringing focus to the material. There are short texts and translation drills. I haven't done much with the translation drills. I'm thinking that will be for another trip through the course. This time through, my goals are reviewing the notes, reading the Esperanto passages, and listening to the dialogues.

Cassette is a very old technology. I have a player. The dialogues seem just a bit sped up. So far, I've heard three voices. La patro (father), la patrino (mother), and neighbor. The father sounds a bit English. The neighbor, Asian.

I haven't abandoned the Jen Nia Mondo track. Yesterday I read the dialogues, some of the notes, and a few of the exercises for lessons 13-17. I listened to one of the radio lessons, and shadowed some dialogues. I'm getting a good intermediate understanding of the material. The recordings, which I sped up a bit some years ago have a few bits where I wonder, "is that the conditional or subjunctive?", etc. Most of the time when I read the book, I'm not listening to the recordings; I split of up the study sessions into multiple pieces each day, and that's helpful.

I've started thinking in Esperanto at times. Sometimes it is completely spontaneous. I've been reluctant to explicit extemporaneous thinking in Esperanto, or really any of my languages, but I'm thinking that may be counter-productive.

Edited by luke on 12 January 2013 at 11:34am



luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4671 days ago

3138 posts - 1257 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 54 of 92
15 January 2013 at 2:12am | IP Logged 
I've been going through one of the free Esperanto books that is available for the iPad. Something like "Esperanto for non-grammarians". The chapters are short. I'm on 7 of 45 or so. The Esperanto reading sections so far have been mostly disjointed sentences, which may be more challenging for the student, but are also not as interesting.

I did unit 4 (of 15) in Teach Yourself Esperanto this morning. Again, I'm reading some of the grammatical notes and reading the Esperanto Text sections (which are narrative, rather than disjointed sentences), and reading and listening to the dialogues.

In the car, I listened to Lesson 18 in Jen Nia Mondo. I read the dialogues for lessons 13-17. I listened to 13-25 in the background.



luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4671 days ago

3138 posts - 1257 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 55 of 92
16 January 2013 at 3:34pm | IP Logged 
I found a good video with Tom Morley on Esperanto if you are curious about its usefulness.

Yesterday, I listened to lesson 19 of Jen Nia Mondo in the car and read and listened to 3 of the earlier dialogues.

In the iPad book by Helen Fryer, I read a couple more lessons. I'm around 9 of 45. The book is quite old, by Esperanto standards, so some small idioms are presented differently, like the word "here" is given as tie ĉi rather than ĉi tie, which I've heard much more. That's no problem. The order that topics or grammatical points are covered is a bit different than I'm used to also. The Esperanto Teacher is also available on Librivox.

Another great Esperanto find is this 55 minute video interviewing a Nobel Prize winner completely in Esperanto with subtitles. I used http://www.vidtomp3.com/ to convert the video to an mp3 and then used Audacity "truncate silence" and then "compressor" with the checkbox "Compress based on peaks" selected. That makes the audio go from 55 minutes to just a hair under 50. The audio isn't really "sped up" this way, but lengthy pauses in the interview go away, and that makes the whole thing more interesting.

Edited by luke on 17 January 2013 at 2:02am

2 persons have voted this message useful



luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4671 days ago

3138 posts - 1257 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 56 of 92
19 January 2013 at 10:46am | IP Logged 
I continue to focus primarily on Jen Nia Mondo. Over the last few days I listened to the radio lessons for lessons 20-22. I've listened to the dialogues 19-25 a couple of times, reading some of the dialogues as I listen. This week almost all of my "book" time has been just reading dialogues. I haven't been reading the notes or doing the practice exercises. After I finish this scoot through the course, I plan to pick it up again around lesson 13, which is where the course switches from book 1 to book 2 and we get a new voice for "Helena". I'm using an approach I heard on one of splog's videos, that is to spend about half the study time on a comprehensive course. The rest of the study time can be something else. Jen Nia Mondo may not be the most comprehensive Esperanto course, but it does cover all the grammar and well over 1000 of the most common Esperanto word roots.



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