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TAC ’15 French Spanish Celtic Adv Study

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sctroyenne
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Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 153 of 336
27 October 2013 at 11:21pm | IP Logged 
liammcg wrote:
Re Assimil, I've read that the pronunciation guide isn't the best,
having been devised by
a non-native speaker. For example, the pronunciation of R is given as the same as in
English, while "ch" is notated with a hard K sound. Having said that, I haven't a notion
about the content itself.


The pronunciation guide basically just references approximate sounds in French (no IPA)
so it's about as imprecise as one that does the same in English. It's also based on
Ulster Irish which is a bit particular. I wouldn't use it as a source for pronunciation
anyway since there's no audio.
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sctroyenne
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739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 154 of 336
30 October 2013 at 3:55am | IP Logged 
So now that I have a "big person" job (where I'm not a student and I'm not paid just
for my presence) I'm feeling the time crunch. Between trying to eat right, start an
exercise regime, get a decent amount of sleep, etc it's hard fitting in four languages
plus English tutoring. The obvious way around this is to really focus on one language
at a time, which I have been doing, but it's easy to get overwhelmed. I tend to get
overwhelmed when facing a big, open-ended project anyway and sometimes I feel this way
during language learning. I've been thinking of meta strategies and incorporating
productivity concepts into my study.

I could do marathon learning sessions on the weekends but I think it would be more
productive to devote a decent amount of time preparing for the rest of the week so I
can fall into language learning quickly and easily. Commute time is pretty easy - I
have my apps, books, podcasts, etc. Before I had lots of free time on the job so I
could do a lot of intensive study (and now I'm regretting not always taking advantage
of it), but now I have to focus on work. I can listen to podcasts but since I can't
devote a lot of attention to them so if I want to have any kind of comprehension I have
to go with my strongest language, French (unless I'm filing or something). Though I've
started posting Irish flashcards on my bulletin board. I can do more work during breaks
though depending on the workload for the day, I sometimes need to use that time to get
up and walk around.

My biggest weakness is collapsing after getting home. This is where I need the most
automated process to avoid vegging out. I often feel like I don't have the energy for
intensive study after work but I feel bad because I feel like most of my study activity
during the day is already passive (though I'm sure this is where eating properly,
exercising, and sleeping well will work with rather than against my language goals).

Beyond that, breaking down my study goals to specific topics helps with the feeling of
being overwhelmed. I think applying the Pomodoro technique here also works (schedule in
15 minutes of going over counting in Irish, break, work on a dialogue for 15 minutes,
break, etc).

I guess the better I prepare the better this will all go. I feel like I should set up
my week so I don't even have to think about what I'm going to do next or take more than
a moment to gather and set up my materials and get started.
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sctroyenne
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739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 155 of 336
06 November 2013 at 6:02am | IP Logged 
Got a little busy as I've moved! Not far, but in a new location all the same.

I'm up to Unit 6 of Gaeilge gán Stró and I'm facing a cold, hard reality. I can
keep up with the lessons and all, but it's going to be a good, long while before I'm
able to speak with ease, even with the little bit I know. I took for granted how easy
it was for me to produce fairly sophisticated output in Spanish early on due to its
proximity to French and easy phonetic system. It's going to take me a lot longer to get
what I've learned so far really down. I wish there were a course such as Michel Thomas
or a longer Pimsleur one that would really pound the patterns into me, though I suppose
it's up to me to do that for myself. My attempts at writing have been more difficult as
well - I can't trust myself to know how anything is spelled and I can't go "off script"
very much because the slightest change would require me to use a case I don't know yet
or apply a lenition/eclipsis rule I haven't learned.

I now respect that it just takes longer to learn a language such as this one than the
"simple" ones. And I can sympathize more with my student who's learning a language
completely unrelated to her own.

I'm wondering if an iTalki tutoring session would do me any good at this point.
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jeff_lindqvist
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Speaks: Swedish*, English
Studies: German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, Mandarin, Esperanto, Irish, French
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 Message 156 of 336
06 November 2013 at 7:36am | IP Logged 
Have you considered copying the texts by hand? When I've studied a lesson "enough", I write all the new words, sentence patterns, dialogues, exercises and so on.
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Indíritheach
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108 posts - 146 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Spanish, Irish, French

 
 Message 157 of 336
06 November 2013 at 2:41pm | IP Logged 
Dia duit, fellow Gaeilge learner!

I really wish I had better advice. I've really enjoyed using FSI Spanish (or Barron's Mastering Spanish..same thing) to drill grammatical patterns into my brain and to give my speech more automacity. I was at work yesterday and speaking Spanish with some co-workers and I noticed that the words just flew out of my mouth without having to think about it...I wish such a course existed for Irish.

What I have done is adapt Learning Irish to suit my needs. After studying it in a more "conventional" way, I go back and listen to the audio of the texts as much as possible and repeat them as quickly as I can. Sort of like shadowing I guess, although I'm not walking around or anything. I also try to do this with Buntús Cainte, listening to the audio as much as possible. The exercises in Ó Siadhail's text are great for drilling grammar, but they're written exercises, not speaking practice. I don't know anything about Gaeilge gán Stró, does it include some audio you could use?

As for the spelling, we're both in the same bád there. I am constantly frustrated when I'm doing the exercises in Learning Irish and I know the answer but for the life of me I can't remember the spelling. Irish orthography does apparently serve some purpose, but this language is quite exotic and I don't think you should be too hard on yourself. It'll probably take three times longer for me to learn Irish as it has for me to learn Spanish. But I think it's worth the effort!

Good luck! I'm enjoying your log!
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jeff_lindqvist
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4250 posts - 5710 votes 
Speaks: Swedish*, English
Studies: German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, Mandarin, Esperanto, Irish, French
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 158 of 336
06 November 2013 at 4:00pm | IP Logged 
Sure, Gaeilge gan Stró comes with audio (4 CD per volume), the dialogues and the "Talking Heads" monologues are perfect for shadowing.
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sctroyenne
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Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4079 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 159 of 336
06 November 2013 at 4:58pm | IP Logged 
I may try writing them out. That certainly ought to help me with the fadas. The broad
with broad/slender with slender rule helps a bit too but mainly to cue me in that
something is wrong, not to help me figure out the right answer yet.

There is quite a bit of audio plus I have audio from other sources. I can spend a whole
commute on one or two dialogues. The talking heads portions often include different
vocabulary so they need a bit more work.

By Unit 6 they introduce quite a few new verbs and adverbs of time (in addition to
telling time). I suppose the best way to go is to swap different components of a
sentence around and experiment until I have it down (essentially, do a set of school
textbook-style exercises).

I got Learning Irish back when I first started (and I'm thankful I did so while
in Europe - looks like it's quite a bit more expensive here). It's intimidating to
start fresh with but I'm wondering if I shouldn't start in on it as well. I like seeing
the more sophisticated sentence structure towards the end.

Other than that I guess there's nothing to do but to be patient and keep plugging away!
1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4079 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 160 of 336
07 November 2013 at 8:18am | IP Logged 
So I gave Learning Irish another try and I quite like it, actually! While the the
texts aren't necessarily the most realistic, they get the grammar points across and the
audio is great (at least now that it's not too overwhelming)! I'll be adding it to my
routine.

It would be nice to make an Anki deck out of it. Now, before I go spending hours
extracting audio and making cards, does someone else already have one they'd like to
share?


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