Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

TAC ’15 French Spanish Celtic Adv Study

 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
336 messages over 42 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 32 ... 41 42 Next >>
sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4079 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 249 of 336
27 March 2014 at 5:05pm | IP Logged 
I'm still excited to discover how much more I can understand from the new episodes of
Aifric that get posted. I can now understand little bits that aren't covered by the
subtitles which means I'm making my way towards understanding without subtitles.

I just got this from Deastore in Italy! It took a long time (over a month) but it was
cheap and shipping was free!



90 minutes of Dora in Irish as well as a few other languages!

I've been experimenting with a sort of flashcard system for Irish starting with the 11
irregular verbs. I made little úrú and séimhiú cards as well as cards for the various
particles. Don't laugh at my awful drawings.





I've also been reviewing Learning Irish a bit. I found this little gem:



I'm sure it has some other meaning but I enjoy it all the same.
3 persons have voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4079 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 250 of 336
27 March 2014 at 8:04pm | IP Logged 
I think there was a thread devoted to French video with subtitles somewhere. If someone
can point me to it, we can add:

FranceTV Pluzz

It automatically redirects you to the videos that are viewable from abroad. Down the
left-hand side, you can select "sous-titrés" to have subtitles. For the video I was
watching, the subtitles lagged quite a bit so this is not a good option for someone
just starting out who wouldn't be able to figure out what to match up on their own. But
for someone who just wants something to go back to to figure out a word or a sentence
that was mumbled it should be a good option.

Also, just wanted to share a link I've known about for a while but kind of forgot
about. It's an online French collocation dictionary:

Collocations
2 persons have voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4079 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 251 of 336
08 April 2014 at 5:30pm | IP Logged 
I'm a bit tardy but here's my March summary:

Month tallies:







248 hours and 54 minutes (should have done something for 6 minutes to make it even...)

Average per day: about 8 hours and almost 2 minutes.

French: 133 hours, 49 minutes
Passive (listening, reading): 126:38
Active (speaking, writing): 2:09
Study time (lessons, classes): 5:02

Irish: 89 hours, 39 minutes
Passive (listening, reading): 28:17
Study time (course, vocab): 61:12
Active (writing): 10 minutes

Spanish (!): 13 hours 35 minutes (course - Duolingo)

Meta: 11 hours, 52 minutes

So I'm still getting my hours in, mainly thanks to listening practically all day. But
I'm afraid this doesn't cut it for improving. It helps create the immersive environment
but it's actually pretty lazy to only sit back and listen and I know I often put off
doing something more intensive, such as writing, just to sit and watch more Aifric.
That makes this a really good time for the learning based challenge to make sure i get
some tasks in

I just received the Intermediate version of Gaeilge gan Stró. I'll go into more detail
later about the differences but it will be more challenging to work with. The increased
difficulty is mitigated somewhat by the fact that the content matter is pretty much the
same as the Beginner level. There are just more "flourishes" and the dialogues are
longer and more complex. The book is much more dialogue-focused so I'll have to get
creative with mining them for everything they can teach me.

Big progress in Irish this month: my listening comprehension grew by leaps and bounds!
Another episode of Aifric that I've watched a million times came back around on TG4.
I'm understanding lots! This is really the secret-find something you can watch over and
over again without torturing yourself. A TV series that has lasted years may not be
best choice because there's too much variety. At only 26 episodes, I get a lot of
repetition watching Aifric. The hard part is finding that magic something that you can
never get tired of. Here you have to be a bit like a child - like when I would beg
people to read me the same story over and over again, when I could watch one Rainbow
Brite movie 100 times, when I would listen to New Kids on the Block until the tapes
wore out (and later, Phantom of the Opera, Les Miserables, Miss Saigon, and Rent).

After the announcement that Duolingo would be adding Irish, I decided to give it a shot
with Spanish. The gamified aspect can be quite motivating and it was easy getting
through the beginning levels. But there are times now where it feels like a slog, like
I'm torturing myself to finish the skill. It's good, but it's not perfect. Other
weaknesses: skills are presented in isolation (there's some mixing, but not as much as
other courses), it tests you on stuff before it's been presented (if i didn't already
have background in Spanish i would have been frustrated), and sometimes answers marked
wrong are debatable. I wouldn't use it as a sole means to learn a language but as an
accompaniment it works great.

This month one of my goals involves French writing. For that I need to come up with a
workflow since I tend to overcomplicate the process of writing in general. So I'll pick
some articles by X date, write down key words by X date, etc. So in addition to
improving my writing I'm also looking into teaching myself how to not make it an
arduous process.

And lastly, I'll leave any readers I may have with this little play on words I ran
across in an article on philospher
Alain Finkielkraut regarding his
controversial nomination to the Academie Française. I'll let you puzzle it out first:

"Dans son dernier ouvrage à succès,L'Identité malheureuse, l'essayiste déplorait
notamment la dérive scatologique de notre vocabulaire, soulignant le déferlement des
termes "chier" et "merde" dans une société "postlittéraire". Ses amis éviteront ainsi
l'utilisation du mot de Cambronne pour lui souhaiter bonne chance le 10 avril."
1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4079 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 252 of 336
10 April 2014 at 8:32am | IP Logged 
So in the spirit of the learning challenge, I'm tackling one of my bêtes noires, the résumé (the next step being the synthèse).

When I first encountered this specific type of writing assignment in my FLE classes in Paris, I really didn't understand why we were doing it. It turns out they really like these things. And now that I've learned more about it, I see why it's a good exercise.

It can be quite difficult to do well, though. What makes the résumé actually harder to do than the synthèse is the constraint of having to stick to the order established by the writer in the original text (that, and the strict word count limits). It also requires an organizational method that just doesn't jive with my regular process which is why I've had such a hard time working on them all this time.

The text I'm working with, Municipales : la gauche n'a perdu que des mairies has already posed a few problems for me. One, it's fairly long so there's a lot of stuff that I just want to put in there but the word count won't let me (the longer the text, the larger percentage of the original text should be cut). Also, the author doesn't link arguments together using transitions, which you're supposed to look for in order to structure the résumé. A lot of the major transitions are expressed through headers so after reducing each section to a few lines, I'm finding that there are big gaps between subjects and arguments. I can't make up my own way of linking them together - it has to come from the text itself in the order presented. It's about 100 words too long and now I'm at the stage where I'm just shaving off random words here and there and I still need to somehow establish links between ideas. I've already put about 4 hours into it - I'm hoping with practice the process will become much quicker. Hopefully in the end the work will show and my tutor will be impressed.

Here's a peak at the process: identifying main ideas of each paragraph, keywords, phrases, and information that should be included, and figuring out the major sections that represent the major ideas of the article as a whole. From there I typed it into outline form and started building my résumé from there.




1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4079 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 253 of 336
10 April 2014 at 5:19pm | IP Logged 
sctroyenne wrote:

And lastly, I'll leave any readers I may have with this little play on words I ran
across in an article on philospher
Alain Finkielkraut regarding his
controversial nomination to the Academie Française. I'll let you puzzle it out first:

"Dans son dernier ouvrage à succès,L'Identité malheureuse, l'essayiste déplorait
notamment la dérive scatologique de notre vocabulaire, soulignant le déferlement des
termes "chier" et "merde" dans une société "postlittéraire". Ses amis éviteront ainsi
l'utilisation du mot de Cambronne pour lui souhaiter bonne chance le 10 avril."


An update regarding this: Finkielkraut was elected to the Académie Française today.
Here are the problems with the French language that he plans to tackle:

Quote:

À quelles tâches prioritaires le nouvel immortel que vous êtes veut-il s'atteler ?
Lutter contre le franglais, pour la modernisation ou au contraire la préservation de
notre orthographe, sauvegarder et faire rayonner notre culture ?

Le franglais ne me paraît pas le plus grave problème. Ce qui m'inquiète, c'est
l'effondrement syntaxique et l'appauvrissement du vocabulaire jusque dans les élites.
L'Académie française, c'est la langue soutenue par la littérature. Je crois beaucoup à
cela, la France est une patrie littéraire, si je peux oeuvrer à cela, j'en serais
honoré.

1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4079 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 254 of 336
04 May 2014 at 9:43pm | IP Logged 
It's been a little while so I'll give a quick update before I do my major one with charts and graphs.

I didn't hit my targets for the Learning Challenge. One reason - it's really easy to choose more passive learning and exposure activities over this kind of active study. Which is why I'll be looking to track my "assignments" completed as well as my time spent. Another reason - work has been a source of major drama so I've been very focused on that for the past few weeks.

Despite that I'm still plugging along. I had hoped the Learning Challenge would get me into a better groove for writing regularly but I didn't keep it up. I'll be looking to do that.

While HTLAL was down I got more into the Google+ HTLAL Learning Den. It could really be a great resource if it takes off. I've been posting content to keep it interesting. I encourage everyone to try it out!

I've been focusing a bit on my pronunciation while reading aloud in French. It may be helping with my accent - the leader of the history seminar I went to kept requesting me to read aloud so that could mean that my reading aloud voice has gotten better.

Speaking of the seminar, for the one on the war in Algeria we read an excerpt from L'amour, la fantasia by Assia Djebar. It's books like these that make you appreciate being able to read materials in their native languages. I have never encountered a style like hers in English language literature (the closest perhaps being Nabokov). While there are a lot of shared literary movements between cultures, each culture really has their own unique literature.

I've been attending another Irish study group that has more advanced, even native (or semi-native) speakers). I'm still grunting in Irish so I'm mostly listening. But it's surprising to me when I can actually follow what people are saying. I can respond using some words not chained together in a grammatical way so I'm working on that. We've been working on a story and we start by reading aloud the week's excerpt. I typical struggle with this but I did get one selection that had a high-frequency of words/chunks that I was already familiar with through GGGS and the marked improvement in my pronunciation was noticeable (the "teacher" of the group praised me). So it's encouraging to know that as I keep working at it my spoken fluency/pronunciation will get better.
2 persons have voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4079 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 255 of 336
05 May 2014 at 5:56pm | IP Logged 
I forgot to mention that I got a bunch of books from the Alliance Française library. For
anyone doing the SC who lives near an AF, this is a great resource. For me, it means
having "free" access to tons of nonfiction. I've started reading La Méditerrannée by
Fernand Braudel.

I looked for some of the BDs emk suggested but I didn't find Persepolis and I only found
the 2nd volume of Le chat du rabbin. I noticed a whole other stack of BDs on my way out
so I'll look again next time.
1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4079 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 256 of 336
08 May 2014 at 6:02pm | IP Logged 
An episode of Aifric that I've watched dozens of times already was re-posted. Like my
other commonly-watched episodes, my listening comprehension level has made a lot of
strides thanks to the repeated exposure. This time, I forced myself to leave the safety
net of the English subtitles (it was hard - I was still quite "scared" that I wouldn't
understand anything) and the results were great! My suspicions were right - the English
subtitles have started to hold me back. There was of course quite a bit that I missed
but there was a lot that I was able to understand that I was missing before while
reading.

This has been the biggest lesson I've learned about languages - it's never too early to
start working on listening comprehension. As hard as Irish can be, I won't have the
listening comprehension lag I had learning French in high school thanks to all the
listening exposure I'm getting (though I say that now, let's see if I still think that
whenever end up visiting the Gaelteacht).

In other news, the week long Irish immersion program was cancelled. I'm pretty
disappointed but now I'm seriously considering using my saved up PTO and money to go to
Guatemala for a couple weeks. I looked and October seems to be a good time for airfare.
I'll be deciding on that soon (if anyone has any input to offer that would be welcome).


1 person has voted this message useful



This discussion contains 336 messages over 42 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.5469 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2021 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.