Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

TAC ’15 French Spanish Celtic Adv Study

 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
336 messages over 42 pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 7 ... 41 42 Next >>
sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3987 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 49 of 336
13 August 2012 at 6:17pm | IP Logged 
So I decided to try the online Spanish placement test at my local university again now
that I've finished another course. This time I didn't have to rely so much on guessing
though there were some vocabulary-based questions I didn't know the answer to (which
word wouldn't you associate with a bed, a tree, etc). Many of the other questions
centered on the use and the conjugation of the subjunctive which thanks to recently
working through it in Madrigal I believe I nailed them. The result: I scored 493 which
put me into 4th semester and beyond, the highest you can test into (the minimum score
being 440). That would put me into Intermediate II and the writing classes. The class
isn't offered so I checked out Intermediate I and the book they use, which happens to
have a sample chapter online. From what I saw I think I could follow the course but to
excel and to get my other skills up to par I would need to work k quite a bit,
especially in learning vocab. But knowing what I do about the people in language
classes I wouldn't be the weakest in the class.

So there you have it - studying Spanish since about March, not nearly as intensively as
I could have, taking a lot of breaks here and there, haven't even made it to Assimil
active wave and I managed to skip 3+ semesters of college Spanish.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Kerrie
Senior Member
United States
justpaste.it/Kerrie2
Joined 3991 days ago

1232 posts - 1740 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Spanish

 
 Message 50 of 336
13 August 2012 at 7:18pm | IP Logged 
sctroyenne wrote:
So there you have it - studying Spanish since about March, not nearly as intensively as I could have, taking a lot of breaks here and there, haven't even made it to Assimil active wave and I managed to skip 3+ semesters of college Spanish.


That is so awesome!

Congratulations. :-)
2 persons have voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3987 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 51 of 336
13 August 2012 at 8:46pm | IP Logged 
Thanks! Checked out your Super Challenge list - should give me some good ideas for
Spanish media (and others)!

Edited by sctroyenne on 14 August 2012 at 1:22am

1 person has voted this message useful



Swift
Senior Member
Ireland
Joined 3204 days ago

137 posts - 191 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: French, Russian

 
 Message 52 of 336
13 August 2012 at 9:58pm | IP Logged 
Wow well done! Not to take anything away from you, I think that shows the advantages of
self-study and some of the failings of a language class. Your knowledge of French
probably made it a bit easier too.

Again though, not to take anything away from you. Well done!
2 persons have voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3987 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 53 of 336
13 August 2012 at 10:37pm | IP Logged 
Oh no, I'm not going to say I put in a superhuman effort or have a super brain. It just
shows how classes are centered around the "topics" of the language and not necessarily
proficiency in using it. So since I know subjunctive, which is considered "advanced" I
automatically shoot up to the highest level. All the "topics" of the language are
relatively easy to learn and so it's easy to do it on your own. A writing class where I
have to mix it all together or some other more advanced class where a teacher is there to
smooth out mistakes is better use of time/money.
1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3987 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 54 of 336
17 August 2012 at 12:06am | IP Logged 
I created my own verb sheets to keep track of everything I've learned about Spanish
verbs and wrote out all the "grammar glue" I've learned out of my grammar book so far.
I also dug out my copy of Breaking Out of Beginner's Spanish and went through
the "faux amis" chapter. I looked through my Spanish Reader again and I'm noticing a
lot more things. I like learning all the other "glue" type phrases though I know I
eventually need to work on some basic vocabulary. I started Memrise to see if I like it
and if it helps.

I've been watching more Spanish television. I think I'm getting better at picking
things out and I notice verbs more now (before they kind of dissppeared). I'm getting
pretty good with commercials, with programming it depends. Just saw some kind of dating
contest show setting up dates for quinceañeras and I was able to understand quite a
bit. Far from 100% but a decent amount. I think I need to listen to more audio that
would be more comprehensible for me but I think exposing myself early to the real stuff
will make leveling up my comprehension much easier and will make it much less
intimidating as I'll be used to the speed. I'm also slowly starting to form phrases to
activate my speaking. I'd like to find some writing prompts to get ideas of what to
write about so I can start that as well (one thing that would have helped Madrigal's
Magical Key).


1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3987 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 55 of 336
18 August 2012 at 8:34pm | IP Logged 
So I've been disappointed in my lack of structure since coming back. While I haven't
completely neglected languages I do want to make more solid progress and have a set
schedule so that I don't waste time and so that I can better manage juggling languages.
I'm going to work on organizing my time and setting things up so that it's easy to slip
into language study mode.

First step is identifying my goals so that I have an idea of what I need to do. In
French my ultimate goal is to get as close to bilingual/native-like as possible (if my
accent can't get that good then I'll settle for flawless with a slight accent). I want
to be C2+. But for my immediate life goals I need a C1 (no extra benefit for being C2)
and being that Paris left me pretty broke I don't have the luxury of taking a C2 test
for fun and pride when C1 is what I need and what I'm pretty confident that I can do.
So I need to look into test schedules and work through my test prep materials and my
goal will be to 1) pass the test and 2) see how high I can score giving me an idea of
how I'd do on a C2 exam should I want to try it down the line.

I'm unsure of how Spanish will fit into my future so I'm unsure of what my ultimate
goal will be. I know that I want to take advantage of my time here when I have easy
access to resources, Spanish language TV, reading material, speakers, etc. I can
probably get to a good level quickly if I do so, so that's my main motivation. It would
be great to be able to follow news (both audio and written) as that gives me access to
news and points of view from a large number of countries. Getting to B1-B2 would
probably satisfy me for now as I also want to start Portuguese once my Spanish is at a
stable place. But we'll see where Spanish takes me once I get to that level - a few
years ago French wasn't a major part of my life and just look at where I am now.

I still want to work on Irish but my main problems are time and working on two new
languages simultaneously. I find that while learning that "basics" in Spanish is pretty
easy for me, the basics in Irish are pretty hard. I'd say that Irish has a pretty big
learning curve (though from what I hear it gets pretty regular after the initial
difficulty). I don't think that I can commit to it everyday (though once I get better
at knowing how words are pronounced I can browse my little picture dictionary that I
bought, or maybe Memrise has a good collection) but I think getting through Buntús
Cainte at the rate of 1-3 lessons per week is doable. Just build my foundation in the
language that can put me in a place to work on it more intensively later. I see some
mini-challenges in my future to give myself little boosts.

I found some books I had ordered from amazon.fr a while back but didn't have much time
to read. One is La Grande Désillusion (Glabalization and its Discontents) by Joesph
Stiglitz. Let me say a word about why nonfiction is better than fiction. The vocabulary
is a lot more relevant and useful. The subjects are the types that you'll encounter on
the language exams, they concern topics that you may discuss with native speakers when
you get the chance, most commercial books are written for lay people (in the case of
this book, educated lay people) so the writing tends to be really straightforward and
not too far off from how someone would be speaking in a lecture and you become more
informed about the world and various topics which is always good. I regret that I
didn't have more money and luggage space to bring home a lot more nonfiction books with
me - I browsed a bookstore a few days before I left and it was quite tempting.

I read the opening outloud and wow, I need to do this more often because I need a lot
of work. Reading outloud isn't the same as speaking but I think that smoothing out my
reading will help make my conversation more fluid. I wrote down words that I found
tripped me up or where I was particulary horrified by my accent. A lot were -ment and -
ion words (which the text was full of), nasals, a's (not satisfied with my a's), and
combinations of vowels and r's with vowels (à un rôle, par où, à orienter). I have
wanted to work on my accent but wasn't sure if all the work would be worth it so I'll
focus for now on fluidity and working on real trouble spots and see if I get better.

I got Harry Potter in Spanish and I tried listen-reading. I found it frustrating. I may
not have given myself enough time to get into the flow but even slowing down the audio
a notch didn't allow me the chance to really absorb what I was reading/hearing, check
new vocab with the English, etc. Is this normal? I'm thinking of maybe reading it
slowly at first like my bilingual reader so that I can take notice of the vocab (noting
the more useful words) and the sentence structure and then going through after with the
audio. Or maybe I just need to adjust or maybe the text is too hard. I'm kind of
excited about getting my reading level up because I still have a backlog of nonfiction
in English that I really want to read (I had a major book buying addiction) but would
cut into my language time. If I can find copies in Spanish, which ought to be easy and
relatively cheap here, then I can use them to get some Spanish work in as well.
1 person has voted this message useful



pbromide
Bilingual Triglot
Groupie
United States
Joined 3143 days ago

76 posts - 98 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish*, French
Studies: Russian, Swedish

 
 Message 56 of 336
18 August 2012 at 10:36pm | IP Logged 
First of all, I am very impressed with the progress you've made in French. I remember
when I understood my first French pun; I was happy for days! I see you here now
explaining all these French puns and I'm feeling rather humbled. As someone who got the
same score on AP French (unlike you, more likely on the listening section as my
listening comprehension, no matter what the language, has an unfortunate tendency to
lean towards incomprehension. In my native languages I've much improved to the point
that I'd say I no longer have any issues, but when it comes to foreign languages... eh,
that's another thing entirely), it's great to know you that starting from the same
position you are in I can get to a C1 and maybe a C2 in French if I try hard enough -
and perhaps this could apply to my preferred other language, Russian!

Secondly, should you ever need any help with Spanish expressions, I'll do my best to
help. As a Cuban, it's very likely that our idioms have little or nothing to do with
European Spanish idioms, but at the end of the day it's the same language.

Thirdly, whoa, Irish! I've been thinking about what language to study after Swedish and
Irish has been floating around my head. I wish you the best of luck with it - not that
you'll need it, seeing you have a great track record with languages and dedication. The
dedication you've put into learning all your languages is admirable. Truth be told, I'm
now inspired to be as active in my languages as you were in French.


2 persons have voted this message useful



This discussion contains 336 messages over 42 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 68 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 3.1406 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2021 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.