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monox D. I-Fly’s Arabic and Japanese Log

  Tags: Arabic | Japanese
 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
394 messages over 50 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 15 ... 49 50 Next >>
Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 3366 days ago

753 posts - 663 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 113 of 394
17 April 2016 at 1:11am | IP Logged 
The Kanji for "tano" (fun) is 楽. It consists of the Kanji 木 (ki = tree) under the Kanji 白 (haku = white) with four small strokes which form the X symbol besides the Kanji 白. But I don't need any of that. To remember that its meaning is "fun", the Kanji 楽 has already looked like a little happy fairy to me.
On an Arabic note, its Arabic word is "marhun", with the base letters M-R-H. My workmate found it ironic that it means "fun" since in Indonesian which takes a lot of words from Arabic, M-R-H is identical with the word "marah", which means "angry".
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Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 3366 days ago

753 posts - 663 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 114 of 394
19 April 2016 at 7:02pm | IP Logged 
Back then I didn't know what the Kanji 岩 meant. It was 山 (yama = mountain) on top of 石 (ishi = stone), so I guessed that the meaning was "hill", and my least guess was "rock". Turned out my least guess was right instead.
On Arabic note, the word for "rock" is "jalmud". I had a hard time associating it with any words I knew at first, but since rocks are mineral and on the ground, I assoeciated "jalmud" with "jewel and mud".
1 person has voted this message useful



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 3366 days ago

753 posts - 663 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 115 of 394
22 April 2016 at 7:26pm | IP Logged 

Found it in my Japanese-language Arabic learning book. I know the Arabis is Jaamuusun (Jawaamiisu) which means "buffalo". Also, the Kanji are 水 (water) and 牛 (cow). However, I don't know how to read 水牛. Is it "mizuushi", "mizugyuu", "suiushi", or "suigyuu"? A water cow means a buffalo still makes sense, though, I and my brother made a joke about it.
Me: "I read in my Japanese-language Arabic learning book that "jaamus" which means "buffalo", in Japanese has the Kanji of "water" and "cow". I don't know how to read it, though. Is it "mizuushi", "mizugyuu", "suiushi", or "suigyuu"?"
My brother: "It seems that it is "suigyuu"."
Me: "Buffalo being called as water cow still makes sense, though."
My brother: "Hmmm... Right..."
Me: "I remember when watching a TV series, the comis relief summoned a water buffalo, then what cames down was a hippo."
My brother: "What?"
Me: "Yeah, and hippos aren't even buffaloes! They are horses (the Indonesian word for "hippo" is "kuda nil", which literally means "Nile horse")! Emmm... Actually, they are pigs..."
1 person has voted this message useful



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 3366 days ago

753 posts - 663 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 116 of 394
24 April 2016 at 6:09pm | IP Logged 
The Japanese word for "fish" is "sakana", while its Arabic is "samakun". This time I also made a joke using the word "sakana" with my brother.
Me: "The Japanese word for "fish" is "sakana", while its Arabic is "samakun". That is close enough."
My brother: "Hmmm..."
Me: "But... To memorize the word "sakana" both in Arabic and Japanese I used the sentence "Fish lives in water.".
My brother: "Huh? What is the Arabic for "lives"?"
Me: ""Sakana"."
My brother: "Haha... Right, I remembered when during a class, my professor posed a question "Who knows the meaning of "sakana"? I spontaneously raised my finger and answered "Fish, sir!". Everyone stared at me with confusion, then I just realized that it was Arabic class..."
1 person has voted this message useful



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 3366 days ago

753 posts - 663 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 117 of 394
24 April 2016 at 7:09pm | IP Logged 
The Arabic word for "near" is قريب (qoriib), which Indonesians absorbed as "karib". However, the word "karib" in Indonesian doesn't straight out mean "near". It is only used in some phrases like "sahabat karib" which literally means "close friend". On the opposite side of the spectrum, the Arabic word for "far" is بعيد (ba'iid), which sounds like "banget" (the Indonesian slang word for "very") a bit. So, to memorize this word, I use the phrase "very far", translating "very" with "banget" and "far" with بعيد to get "ba'iid banget".
1 person has voted this message useful



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 3366 days ago

753 posts - 663 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 118 of 394
25 April 2016 at 7:24pm | IP Logged 
The Arabic word for "strong" is قوي, which has the same root as قوة (power). It helps that the word قوة (quwwat) has been absorbed to Indonesian as "kuat" which means "strong" (قوي = qowiy).
On a side note, the name of Indonesian president was known as Jokowi. Using "jo" from the Kanji "ue (up)" = 上 (I know that the Kanji "ue = up" can be read as "jo" thanks to the Ninja ranks in Naruto), and قوي which means "strong (強)", I like to playfully write his name as 上強.
1 person has voted this message useful



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 3366 days ago

753 posts - 663 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 119 of 394
26 April 2016 at 7:18pm | IP Logged 
The word "steam" has the Kanji 汽 which is read as "ki", while the word "gas" has the Kanji 気 and is also read as "ki". "Steam" consists of "gas" added with the radical "sanzui" (シ) makes sense, considering that steam = gas + water. However, I still can't understand why the radical which looks like the Katakana for me (メ) was left out from the Kanji 気. What is the meaning of that radical, anyway? What is present in gas abut absent in steam?
1 person has voted this message useful



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 3366 days ago

753 posts - 663 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 120 of 394
28 April 2016 at 5:47pm | IP Logged 
The Kanji for the word "bow" (yumi) is 弓, which does look like a bow. I wonder, though, why it alongside with the Kanji 虫 (mushi = insect) are present in the Kanji 強 (tsuyo = strong).


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