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Which Scandinavian language to study?

 Language Learning Forum : Skandinavisk & Nordisk Post Reply
169 messages over 22 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 14 ... 21 22 Next >>
Jenne:)
Tetraglot
Newbie
Netherlands
polyglotquest.wordpr
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38 posts - 56 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, German, French
Studies: Norwegian

 
 Message 105 of 169
24 September 2012 at 2:11pm | IP Logged 
I believe Finnish is not a Scandinavian language, even though, historically, Finland is part of Scandinavia. Nowadays, Scandinavia consists of Norway, Sweden en Denmark. Finnish does not belong to the same language family as the Scandinavian languages. Whereas Norwegian, Danish, and Swedish are North Germanic languages, Finnish is a Uralic one. Finland is one of the Nordic countries, however, the others being Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and Iceland. So it is a Nordic language, but not a Scandinavian one :).
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limey75
Senior Member
United Kingdom
germanic.eu/
Joined 2706 days ago

119 posts - 182 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: German, Norwegian, Old English

 
 Message 106 of 169
09 November 2012 at 7:25am | IP Logged 
If you want to get maximum bang for your buck when learning a mainland Scandinavian language, learn Norwegian (Bokmål). It will give you a very strong understanding of written Danish, and open you up well to spoken Swedish.

If you want to be able to also understand spoken Danish, Swedish should the last language you learn. Try Norwegian and you'll get a headstart.
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Medulin
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Croatia
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Speaks: Croatian*, English, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Norwegian, Hindi, Nepali

 
 Message 107 of 169
09 November 2012 at 7:37pm | IP Logged 
But only 20 % of Norwegians speak Bokmål, or dialects close to it; if you go to Bergen, Trondheim, Tromsø, Stavanger, you won't understand the people. And Norwegians DO NOT code switch to Bokmål in formal situations, Bokmål is for 80% of Norwegians just a written language.

Edited by Medulin on 09 November 2012 at 7:38pm

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limey75
Senior Member
United Kingdom
germanic.eu/
Joined 2706 days ago

119 posts - 182 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: German, Norwegian, Old English

 
 Message 108 of 169
09 November 2012 at 7:47pm | IP Logged 
Medulin wrote:
But only 20 % of Norwegians speak Bokmål, or dialects close to it; if you go to Bergen, Trondheim, Tromsø, Stavanger, you won't understand the people. And Norwegians DO NOT code switch to Bokmål in formal situations, Bokmål is for 80% of Norwegians just a written language.


But it's the standard in Norway that the majority understand. If you learnt "Nynorsk" you will be further away from Danish, and probably Swedish too. But you might have an easier time with Icelandic ;)
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louisjanus
Newbie
United States
NorwegianLanguage.inRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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11 posts - 19 votes
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 109 of 169
09 November 2012 at 8:20pm | IP Logged 
how do you define close? My definition is that Oslovians understand and can be understood around Norway. Of
course you'll understand the speakers from Trondheim, Tromsø, Stavanger.... if you have a good open mind.

And whoever said 20% of the people SPEAK bokmål. 0% speak bokmål. Everyone speaks his/ her own regional
dialect. Some dialects are closer to WRITTEN bokmål.

And my wife, a fluent Swedish speaker, finds nynorsk easier to understand than bokmål. Although she can do just
fine with either. Sogning however, is another matter altogether.
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daegga
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Austria
lang-8.com/553301
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1076 posts - 1789 votes 
Speaks: German*, EnglishC2, Swedish, Norwegian
Studies: Danish, French, Finnish, Icelandic

 
 Message 110 of 169
16 November 2012 at 10:43pm | IP Logged 
Medulin wrote:
But only 20 % of Norwegians speak Bokmål, or dialects close to it; if you go to Bergen, Trondheim, Tromsø, Stavanger, you won't understand the people. And Norwegians DO NOT code switch to Bokmål in formal situations, Bokmål is for 80% of Norwegians just a written language.


Sure you can understand them. Especially the dialects spoken in Bergen and Trondheim are not that far off. Exposure is everything, it just takes some time to get used to. Norwegian dialects seem to be a lot closer to the written language than some German dialects to Standard German. No need to code switch.
Reading some Nynorsk (should be possible without further learning once you are good in Bokmål) and stuff written in dialect (on the internet... and "Dinas Bok" has the dialogues in a Trøndelag dialect for example) might help to close the gap if necessary.

Edited by daegga on 16 November 2012 at 10:50pm

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jeff_lindqvist
Diglot
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SwedenRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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Speaks: Swedish*, English
Studies: German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, Mandarin, Esperanto, Irish, French
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 Message 111 of 169
17 November 2012 at 12:04am | IP Logged 
After comparing random Wikipedia articles in both Nynorsk and Bokmål, I have no problems understanding either. The neverending question which Norwegian variety to learn is a nonissue, in my opinion. It's on the same level as British vs. American English, or European vs. Brazilian Portuguese.
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louisjanus
Newbie
United States
NorwegianLanguage.inRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3926 days ago

11 posts - 19 votes
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 112 of 169
17 November 2012 at 10:25pm | IP Logged 
jeff_lindqvist wrote:
After comparing random Wikipedia articles in both Nynorsk and Bokmål, I have no
problems
understanding either. The neverending question which Norwegian variety to learn is a nonissue, in my opinion.
It's
on the same level as British vs. American English, or European vs. Brazilian Portuguese.


Of course it all depends on the purpose of learning Norwegian. If reading texts is the most important for you, it
doesn't matter. If writing, it does matter a little more, as it is considered bad style to mix forms between bokmål
and nynorsk. If speaking is of primary interest, learn a regional dialect. Neither bokmål nor nynorsk is a spoken
standard.

I'd guess the differences in writing between Br and Am English are trifling when compared to the bokmål /
nynorsk
differences. As a Swede, do you think that learning Danish is a non-issue?

Edited by louisjanus on 18 November 2012 at 5:18pm



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