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Small Expectations

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TixhiiDon
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 3699 days ago

772 posts - 1473 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese, German, Russian
Studies: Georgian

 
 Message 289 of 431
11 January 2012 at 2:36pm | IP Logged 
I've been getting right back into the Georgian groove this week with lots of hours of
study.

I'm still working on Hewitt on my iPad. I'm onto Chapter 9 now, and good old George
continues to clear up lots of things for me that I'd never really understood properly
from the other textbooks. For example, I think I finally have at least a vague idea of
when the strong aorist endings are used. He still goes into excessive detail, and he
has an unhealthy fascination with grammatical terminology, and the dialogues continue
to be completely divorced from reality, but all in all this is a good book and not
worth the slating it gets on Amazon.

I also restarted both my language exchange and my group class this week. The language
exchange was just OK. We started out in English so I told my partner all my
interesting anecdotes from my trip to Tbilisi in English, leaving me with nothing much
to say when we switched to Georgian. It has also been a relatively long time since I
actually spoke any Georgian, so I was quite rusty. Couldn't even dredge up the word
for "hotel" from the depths of my brain. I'm sure I'll get back into the swing of
things soon though.

The group lesson tonight was the usual mix of painfully long silences and discussion of
the finer points of obscure Georgian grammar rules, in Japanese of course. You'd have
thought, wouldn't you, that people would want to practice saying what they did last
week more than to debate the optative of irregular Class II verbs in their native
language? Apparently not.... However, we're going to look at participle formation
next week, and this is something I have pretty much completely ignored up to now, so
I'm looking forward to it.

I have two sentences I've been thinking about over the last couple of days, and I'm not
sure how to say them in Georgian, so Murdoc, if you're around, could you check these
for me?

1) She was busy preparing to go to America.
დაკავებული იყო ამერიკაში წასვლის მომზადებით.
I don't know if it's possible to pair ამერიკაში with წასვლა to mean "going to
America".

2) This is the book Medea told me she wanted to read
ეს ის წიგნია რომელზეც მედეამ მითხრა მინდა წავიკითხოო.
Or maybe:
ეს ის წიგნია მედეამ რომ მითხრა მინდა წავიკითხოო.

I'm also still ploughing through მოცემულობა. It's a little more difficult than his
other books, and to be honest, not quite as interesting, even though it started out so
well. The murder case has been all but forgotten and there's lots of rubbish about
what is life and what is death and all that malarkey. Still, I'll be finished soon,
and then I'll either go back to მგლები or pick something else from my pile of Georgian
books.

Edited by TixhiiDon on 12 January 2012 at 12:00am

3 persons have voted this message useful



Murdoc
Triglot
Senior Member
Georgia
Joined 3489 days ago

113 posts - 208 votes 
Speaks: Georgian*, English, Russian

 
 Message 290 of 431
12 January 2012 at 5:12pm | IP Logged 
TixhiiDon,
Quote:
დაკავებული იყო ამერიკაში წასვლის მომზადებით.


დაკავებული იყო ამერიკაში წასასვლელად მომზადებით.

Quote:
ეს ის წიგნია რომელზეც მედეამ მითხრა მინდა წავიკითხოო.


Quote:
ეს ის წიგნია მედეამ რომ მითხრა მინდა წავიკითხოო.


They both sound right to me, though it'd be probably more natural or casual to say წაკითხვა მინდაო instead of მინდა წავიკითხოო.

პ.ს. მე პირადად არ წამიკითხავს, მაგრამ "მგლები" ძალიან დაბალი დონის წიგნად ითვლება საქართველოში, საბჭოთა კრიმინალური მენტალიტეტის უნიჭო პროპაგანდაა. არჩევანის საშუალება თუ გაქვს, სხვა წიგნი წაიკითხე :)

1 person has voted this message useful



TixhiiDon
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 3699 days ago

772 posts - 1473 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese, German, Russian
Studies: Georgian

 
 Message 291 of 431
12 January 2012 at 11:47pm | IP Logged 
Murdoc, დიდი მადლობა დახმარებისთვის. არ ვიცოდი რომ მგლებს ასე ცუდი რეპუტაცია აქვს
საქართველოში. ამას წინათ დაახლოებით 50 გვერდი წავიკითხე და მეც მეგონა ძალიან
სულელი წიგნია-მეთქი :) მაინტერესებს აკა მორცილაძეს წიგნები და Maid In Tiflis და ერთი
მოთხრობების კრება ვიყიდე თბილისში, მაგრამ ცოტა ძნელია ჩემთვის. შენი საყვარელი
ქართველი მწერალი ვინ არი?
1 person has voted this message useful



zecchino1991
Senior Member
United States
facebook.com/amyybur
Joined 3493 days ago

778 posts - 885 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Italian, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Arabic (Written), Romanian, Icelandic, Georgian

 
 Message 292 of 431
13 January 2012 at 11:00am | IP Logged 
TixhiiDon wrote:
Murdoc, დიდი მადლობა დახმარებისთვის. არ ვიცოდი რომ მგლებს ასე ცუდი
რეპუტაცია აქვს
საქართველოში. ამას წინათ დაახლოებით 50 გვერდი წავიკითხე და მეც მეგონა ძალიან
სულელი წიგნია-მეთქი :) მაინტერესებს აკა მორცილაძეს წიგნები და Maid In Tiflis და ერთი
მოთხრობების კრება ვიყიდე თბილისში, მაგრამ ცოტა ძნელია ჩემთვის. შენი საყვარელი
ქართველი მწერალი ვინ არი?


Wow, I can't wait until I can read/write that much! I think I understand the first part
that says "Thank you very much for your help. I didn't know that Mglebi had such a bad
reputation in Georgia." And the last one I think means "Who is your favorite Georgian
author?" I understand some more words here and there, but not everything. Makes me want
to study even harder! :)

Edited by zecchino1991 on 13 January 2012 at 11:00am

1 person has voted this message useful



Murdoc
Triglot
Senior Member
Georgia
Joined 3489 days ago

113 posts - 208 votes 
Speaks: Georgian*, English, Russian

 
 Message 293 of 431
13 January 2012 at 9:40pm | IP Logged 
TixhiiDon,
არაფრის. აკა მორჩილაძე მომწონს, თანამედროვე ქართველი მწერლებიდან ალბათ ყველაზე მეტადაც. ჩემი საყვარელი ქართველი მწერლები კი რა თქმა უნდა ძველ თაობებს წარმოადგენენ: ვაჟა–ფშაველა, მიხეილ ჯავახიშვილი, ილია ჭავჭავაძე, გალაკტიონ ტაბიძე, ნიკოლოზ ბარათაშვილი. შედარებით გვიანდელი – გიორგი ლეონიძე, გურამ დოჩანაშვილი, გურამ რჩეულიშვილი, ჭაბუა ამირეჯიბი.


Quote:
ძალიან სულელი წიგნია


ძალიან სულელური წიგნია.
სულელი მხოლოდ სულიერზე ითქმის.

Quote:
მოთხრობების კრება ვიყიდე




მოთხრობების კრებული ვიყიდე.
კრება – gathering of people
კრებული – collection

zecchino1991,
ყველაფერი სწორია.








Edited by Murdoc on 13 January 2012 at 9:41pm

1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3401 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 294 of 431
17 January 2012 at 12:46am | IP Logged 
Hi Tixhiidon!

Just to inform you I've started my own log (finally!).
I do plan to continue following yours, thanks for all the help!

Here it is.

http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?T ID=30846&PN=1
1 person has voted this message useful



TixhiiDon
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 3699 days ago

772 posts - 1473 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese, German, Russian
Studies: Georgian

 
 Message 295 of 431
18 January 2012 at 11:38pm | IP Logged 
The group lesson at Asahi Culture Center last night was really good. I am all over
Georgian participles! Apart from learning the rules to actually form them (which, no
surprise at all, are full of exceptions and irregularities), we learned some fantastic
set phrases and idioms that use them. Feast your eyes on these:

დამზადებულია იაპონიაში: "Made in Japan", with the past participle of დამზადება, "to
prepare" or "to make", i.e. "that which was made".

ჩემი შემშინებელი არავინ არის: "I'm not scared of anyone", with the, oh, come to
think of it, I don't actually know the name of this participle in English... 能動分詞
in Japanese, of შეშინება, "to scare", i.e. "he who scares".

გასაწითლებელი ამბავი: "An embarrassing occurrence", with the future participle of
გაწითლება, "to go red" or "to make red", i.e. an event that will make me go red.

Along the same lines, გასაგიჟებელი ამბავი: "A crazy occurrence", with the future
participle of გაგიჟება "to go/make crazy", i.e. an event that will make me crazy.

ნაჭამი ვარ: "I am full", with the perfect participle of ჭამა, "to eat".
ნასვამი ვარ: "I am drunk", with the perfect participle of სვამს "to drink".
ნაყინი, which means "ice-cream" and is in fact a perfect participle meaning "that which
has been frozen" from ყინავს.

ეს არ არის გასაფუჭებელი: "This is not to be broken", or in other words "You better
not break this or I won't be responsible for my actions!", using the future participle
of გააფუჭებს.

წერილი მაქვს გასაგზავნი: "I have a letter to be sent", i.e. "I've got to send a
letter".

გაცნობილი მყავს: "I've met him before" (but we're not close).

სულ არა ხარ შეცვლილი! "You haven't changed a bit!"

And I could go on and on. All fantastically useful stuff, right?

At the group class we study using a textbook from Georgia, which was produced for the
Georgian Language summer school at Tbilisi University (which I would give my eye teeth
to participate in), and a Japanese textbook produced especially for Asahi Culture
Center, which is currently being extensively revised for publication by our teacher
Medea's husband, Yasuhiro Kojima.

Both texts simplify things a lot, lay out the rules quickly and easily, and then
provide a few exercises. This is in stark contrast to Hewitt, and to a lesser extent
Aronson (Kiziria doesn't even get round to participles in Beginner's Georgian), who
wind themselves up in endless explanation of tiny irregularities in obscure verbs that
no-one would ever need in general daily conversation, so much so that the initial,
basic rules become completely lost in all the surrounding noise.

When the Asahi textbook is published I would almost go so far as to say that it's worth
learning Japanese just to be able to use it to learn Georgian! It's really that good -
best in the world, I reckon.



Edited by TixhiiDon on 19 January 2012 at 2:47am

1 person has voted this message useful



Hendriklohuis
Diglot
Newbie
NetherlandsRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4415 days ago

4 posts - 4 votes
Speaks: Dutch*, Russian
Studies: Georgian, Pashto

 
 Message 296 of 431
20 January 2012 at 1:45pm | IP Logged 
Dear Tixhiidon,

It's good to see you've been back to Georgia too! I've been to Georgia last year for a couple of days and had the pleasure to visit Tbilisi. I'm really curious about the book that is used by the Georgian Summer University and the Asahi textbook. Too bad the latter is not in English. Do you have the idea it would be worth trying to translate it some day?

The Georgian Summer University is expensive but still it could be worth it. Or, alternatively, go to Georgia for half a year with Teach and Learn in Georgia.

Georgian language classes at the Ivane Javakhisvili Tbilisi State University are not too expensive either (GEL 200 a month; see: http://www.tsu.edu.ge/en/faculties/faculty_of_humanities/lan guage_center and http://www.tsu.edu.ge/en/faculties/faculty_of_humanities/lan guage_center/essential_information_

Kind regards,

Hendrik



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