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New Super Challenge Discussion thread2014

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kanewai
Triglot
Senior Member
United States
justpaste.it/kanewai
Joined 3050 days ago

1386 posts - 3054 votes 
Speaks: English*, French, Marshallese
Studies: Italian, Spanish

 
 Message 649 of 766
02 December 2014 at 8:57pm | IP Logged 
I think I'd also have a hard time identifying slang in a book or on tv, but it's a lot
more obvious on social media like facebook, twitter, etc. Of course, on social media
it might also just be bad grammar.

This is still a half-formed idea, but here's a start:

The Game: Slang Bingo
The Challenge: Create your own categories, and find five slang words/phrases to
fill them
Sources: Any

Be creative with your categories. 5 French words I can't find in a dictionary, 5
Italian words I only hear on cop shows, 5 things Croatian goalies say when a goal gets
by, 5 words I learned on a Shanghai bus, whatever.


Ground rules:
Copying, expanding, and riffing off of other lists is good (e.g., 5 more words ... )
Discussion and debate on what the words mean is good
Play as often as you like
Risqué words are fine. Hate words are not.

Edited by kanewai on 02 December 2014 at 9:02pm

4 persons have voted this message useful



kanewai
Triglot
Senior Member
United States
justpaste.it/kanewai
Joined 3050 days ago

1386 posts - 3054 votes 
Speaks: English*, French, Marshallese
Studies: Italian, Spanish

 
 Message 650 of 766
05 December 2014 at 1:38am | IP Logged 
and radio silence ...

Folks were interested in the slang idea; anyone have other ideas on how to structure
it?


1 person has voted this message useful



Solfrid Cristin
Heptaglot
Winner TAC 2011 & 2012
Senior Member
Norway
Joined 3495 days ago

4143 posts - 8862 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, Spanish, Swedish, French, English, German, Italian
Studies: Russian

 
 Message 651 of 766
05 December 2014 at 7:16am | IP Logged 
I think it is a great idea, but personally I am at too low a level to be able to do this. I do not know any Russian
slang at all, and I suspect that is the case for more people. However, we might turn that around, and make it
into a collective effort, if we allow people to help eachother across languages.

I want to do this, but I need help:-)

So who can help me with the following:

5 Russian words you use in the following situations - I'll contribute with Norwegian ones:

5 words you use when you lose something heavy on your foot (ranged from the harshest to the mildest)
Faen (devil) (very common)
Helvete (hell)
Pokker (caramba)
Søren (oh my)
(For the life of me I cannot think of more than 4, and then I have included two really mild ones - we do not
swear much in Norwegian - most people use English for real swearing. I use Spanish)

5 words you use to call your lover

Elskling (darling)
Nydlingen min (my beautiful one)
Søtnos (sweet nose )
Pusen (pussycat)
Kjære (dear)

(Nr. 3 and 4 would mostly be used on women)

5 words you use when you are angry with someone

Drittsekk (shitbag) (very common)
Jævla drittstøvel (damned shit boot)
Kålhue (cabbage head)
Kjøtthue (meat head)
Dust (jerk)


5 miscellaneous expressions

Det kan du ta lang fart og drite i (you can take a long speed and shit in that = never mind)
Det skal du ta og gi faen i (Don't you give a devil about that - idem)
Dra til helvete - go to hell
Skitt -shit (when you realize you have done something stupid, or something bad is about to happen)
Forsvinn, din amøbe - ( disappear, you amoeba)


So, ant Russan equivelants, or contributions from other languages for those who like me are at a too low
level to be able to find slang in their target language?
1 person has voted this message useful



Radioclare
Triglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
timeofftakeoff.com
Joined 2744 days ago

689 posts - 1119 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Esperanto
Studies: Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian

 
 Message 652 of 766
05 December 2014 at 9:54am | IP Logged 
kanewai wrote:
and radio silence ...


Sorry, I thought that sounded like a great way to do it and I have already started compiling some Croatian examples :)
1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3552 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 653 of 766
05 December 2014 at 5:43pm | IP Logged 
kanewai wrote:

This is still a half-formed idea, but here's a start:

The Game: Slang Bingo
The Challenge: Create your own categories, and find five slang words/phrases to
fill them
Sources: Any


Just coming back to this topic after a while. Great idea! I've been compiling lists of
vocabulary which feature quite a bit of slang so this is a good chance to consolidate it
all.
1 person has voted this message useful



Jeffers
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 3070 days ago

2151 posts - 3960 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Hindi, Ancient Greek, French, Sanskrit, German

 
 Message 654 of 766
05 December 2014 at 6:19pm | IP Logged 
kanewai wrote:
and radio silence ...

Folks were interested in the slang idea; anyone have other ideas on how to structure
it?



Sorry, I think it's a great idea too. 5 words I couldn't find in the dictionary is a good category for me. I'll start keeping a memo on my phone. I'll probably come up with another category or two for myself as I go along. If I do, I'll try to remember to post it here.
1 person has voted this message useful



Spanky
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 4117 days ago

1020 posts - 1714 votes 
Studies: French

 
 Message 655 of 766
05 December 2014 at 8:14pm | IP Logged 
Solfrid Cristin wrote:
...

I'll contribute with Norwegian ones:
...
Jævla drittstøvel (damned shit boot)
...
Det kan du ta lang fart og drite i (you can take a long speed and shit in that = never mind)



Awesome! I have been using these expressions non-stop all morning now as a sign-off on my office emails. I assumed I could do so with impunity: although there is a constellation of language backgrounds in my office, no one knows Norwegian.

Now unfortunately I rather desperately have to figure out how to block my boss from accessing google translate.

Edited by Spanky on 05 December 2014 at 8:15pm

2 persons have voted this message useful



Radioclare
Triglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
timeofftakeoff.com
Joined 2744 days ago

689 posts - 1119 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Esperanto
Studies: Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian

 
 Message 656 of 766
06 December 2014 at 10:06pm | IP Logged 
I have been quite excited about the slang challenge, because for most of the Super Challenge I have been watching a Croatian sitcom called 'Bitange i Princeze' (Rogues and Princesses) which is set in Zagreb and which I know uses a lot of local slang. I've watched over 100 episodes of this now, so I'm getting quite used to the sort of things the characters say, and I have definitely heard words which I can't find in my dictionaries so this seemed like a good opportunity to investigate some of them in more detail.

So, I bring to you five Croatian slang words which you will frequently hear in 'Bitange i Princeze' :)

1. Lova (money)
In this clip Irena is very excited by the fact that she's just borrowed some cash from a loan shark. The other characters, who have all lost their jobs in the recession, are planning to invest it in setting up Croatia's first ostrich farm. She sings "Aha, aha, lovu imam ja, a Kumerle će čistit govna, govna nojeva" (Aha, aha, I've got the money, and Kumerle (the bald guy on the end) will clean the sh*t, the ostrich sh*t).

The normal word for 'money' in Croatian would be 'novac'. 'Lova' is a slang word (which I think is used throughout the entire region, not just in Croatia) and which apparently comes from a Romani word.

2. Frajer (guy)
In this clip (0.07) one of the character is trying to impress a famous Serbian rapper by demonstrating a rap he has invented. At 0.07 you can hear how the rapper says "Molim te pusti dečko bi da čujem kako frajer rep" (Let him please, I want to hear how the guy raps). In this instance 'frajer' is said by a man about a man so I think the meaning is no more complicated than 'guy'. I couldn't find an example this evening, but in some situations I have heard it used by women about men and I think then it can imply that the guy is good-looking/attractive. Apparently the word comes from the German 'Freier'.

3. Buraz (brother, mate)
This is a short clip in which Robi is trying to fill out a job application which asks him which languages he speaks. At 0.08 you can hear him say to his friend Teo "Koje ne govorim, buraz!" (Which don't I speak, mate!). He then goes on to list English, Slovene, Latin (he thinks they won't be able to tell whether he can speak that) and Brazilian :) 'Buraz' seems to be a word interjected into conversation quite frequently, at least in Zagreb.

4. Fakat (really)
I have heard this word a lot on TV and all I could work out from context is that it seemed to add emphasis, eg. "ne znam" (I don't know) vs "ja fakat ne znam" (I really don't know!). For a while I wondered if it was a swear word but having looked it up online it does just mean something like "really, indeed". In this episode (starting from about 7.11) one of the characters is being led away by the police under suspicion of being involved with a criminal who has committed arson. As he is dragged away you can hear him say "Gazda, ja fakat nemam veze s njim" (Boss, I really don't have anything to do with him)

5. Ziher (sure, certain)
This one confused me for ages. I heard it, understood it as German "sicher" and it was weeks before it occurred to me that Croatians don't speak German. But when I looked it up I found that it is a slang word which does indeed come from German and has the same meaning. The proper Croatian word would be 'siguran'. In this episode starting from about 21.18, you can see Robi being interviewed by Croatian police under suspicion of having smoked weed in a pub toilet. The policeman says "Lažete, imamo svejdoka koji vas je vidio" (You're lying, we have a witness who saw you) and Robi replies "Gledajte, ja sam ziher da vas taj nazovi svjedok driblja" (Look, I'm certain that this so-called witness of yours is lying). 'Driblati' literally means "to dribble" but colloquially it also seems to mean to deceive or cheat someone.



4 persons have voted this message useful



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