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Papiamento cuts in line - B1 in 5 months

  Tags: Papiamento
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 2366 days ago

3280 posts - 1014 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 1 of 153
02 April 2013 at 12:24am | IP Logged 
Bon dia!

A fifth language just popped up in my busy daily schedule. I foresee a trip to Aruba in September, and saince Papiamento was already in my list, it overtook Estonian as the language I'd do next. And it didn't even have to wait till I reached a better level in any of the ones I'm currently studying. Well, a 1-week like that is a unique chance to practice the language, so I have to take the chance.

As ambitious as my goal may sound, I have to say that I have dabbled into Papiamento before and learned the very basic words. Besides, I speak Portuguese as native, English as basic fluency and can understand Spanish. So, it's not that I'm starting from zero.

Goal
To reach at least a conversational tourist level, or ideally a solid passive reading B1 and low active speaking B1.
I'll be focusing on the Aruban spelling because that's where I'm planning to go, but I'll always try to keep in mind the different spellings and actual usages of words, also because at first I planned to focus on the Curaçao variety and the textbook I'm going to use also focuses on that.

What I have
Getting around the islands in Papiamentu (a phrasebook)
Papiamento textbook

What I need
Audio. I don't have any resources with audio. The only audio I've found so far are random videos in Youtube, mainly interviews, news and podcasts. I didn't even find basic sentences with audio.

A native or an advanced learner to help with solving doubts on usage.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 2366 days ago

3280 posts - 1014 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 2 of 153
02 April 2013 at 12:26am | IP Logged 
So far,I've started reading the phrasebook. Actually, I'm about to finish it. It's far from causing me burnout, it's such a relaxing language to learn! Quite interesting from a linguistical point of view, too. It's great to spot the etimology of a word from Portuguese, Spanish, English or Dutch.

I'm also using a shared anki deck on basic words, but I'll try to create my own deck with sentences, which are what I need the most, as a way to keep alive what I read in both the phrasebook and the textbook.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 2366 days ago

3280 posts - 1014 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 3 of 153
03 April 2013 at 9:47pm | IP Logged 
I forgot to mention this book with expired copyright, that can be accessed through Google Books:

GUIA para los españoles hablar papiamento y viceversa: Para que los de Curazao puedan hablar espanol

I'm afraid it's prior to the definition of either Papiamento spelling, but given the shortage of resources, it might be useful anyway.

====

And I'm done with Getting Around the Islands in Papiamentu !! It's a useful phrasebook, more comprehensive than the average phrasebook. It gave me important insights into culture, even though it seems to focus on Curaçao and I'm going to Aruba. It has dialogues at the end of some chapters, so now I can have at least a basic idea of the living language.

I'm still going to go back to this book later, even if just for ankifying its useful sentences.

Tomorrow I may start with Papiamentu textbook. I hope it won't take much long. I want to delve into native materials - preferably audio - asap. I have the impression the language will somehow just start to flow. It's almost like learning a Romance language, with the advantage of a simple conjugation.

Papiamento has tones just like Norwegian. I need to listen in order to get familiarized with them. There's a tone that is common with disyllabic verbs, which also usually get stressed in the penultimate syllable, unlike their PT/ES roots. So, I have to get used to stressing:

hasi (from hacer)
yama (from llamar)

etc. all on the first syllable, which is going against my Iberian rules. That's why I need the audio badly. Hopefully I can get online broadcasts of Aruban radios.



iguanamon
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Virgin Islands
Speaks: Ladino
Joined 2462 days ago

2224 posts - 4519 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole

 
 Message 4 of 153
03 April 2013 at 10:29pm | IP Logged 
A couple of years ago, I collected some Papiamento links. I thought I might learn it at some point, since I live in the Caribbean, but I got sidetracked by Haitian Creole. My 78 year old barber is from Curaçao. He speaks Spanish, English, Papiamento and Dutch.

Some links: Radio Hoyer 1
Malprensa Blog
Radio Nederlands Papiaments
Papiamentu tur dia a good resource blog for learners.
TV Aruba

Boa sorte, Expugnator, espero que te ajude.


Edited by iguanamon on 03 April 2013 at 11:21pm

3 persons have voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 1907 days ago

5310 posts - 4077 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 5 of 153
03 April 2013 at 10:39pm | IP Logged 
Papiamento is a language I should know more about, given that this one is a part of my
country (some of the islands on which the language is spoken are "special municipalities"
of the Netherlands), but I have never been to the Antilles and heard this language
spoken.

What I do know is that Antilleans (and Surinamese for that matter, although their creole
is usually Sranan Tongo) speak some of the most hilarious Dutch.

Boa sorte!

Edited by tarvos on 03 April 2013 at 10:39pm



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 2366 days ago

3280 posts - 1014 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 6 of 153
03 April 2013 at 11:19pm | IP Logged 
I advanced into Papiamentu Textbook. I read the introduction and almost all of lesson 1. There are exercises, and I hope I can do Papiamento-English translations followed by English-Papiamento versions (other sentences, of course). Thus, I can work on both active and passive language skills.

Thanks for the encouragement, iguanamon and tarvos. @tarvos, boa sorte is Portuguese, but I bet you know it =D

Papiamentu tur dia is a nice blog indeed, I plan to harvest on it once I'm done with the textbooks.



kujichagulia
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 2047 days ago

1031 posts - 537 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Japanese, Portuguese

 
 Message 7 of 153
04 April 2013 at 2:40am | IP Logged 
Papiamento seems so amazing. I may have to put that on my list. Haitian Creole, too.



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 2366 days ago

3280 posts - 1014 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 8 of 153
04 April 2013 at 8:10pm | IP Logged 
I think you'd benefit from Papiamento first, kuji, because it's Portuguese/Spanish based, while Haitian Creole is French-based. There aren't that many resources, like I told you, but the language itself is really fun! I want to delve into native resources asap.

Today I'm starting Papiamentu Textbook officially. The translation exercises are indeed extensive. I believe this book can lead you up to B1 or even B2, with the amount of practice and vocabulary.

Pity that I can't listen to audio or video other than Youtube at work, so I'm going to have to find a way to listen to Aruban stations early in the morning. I'm only going to give them a try once I've been through a few lessons at the textbook, anyway.



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