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Polish Profile

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Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5663 days ago

4228 posts - 8256 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 1 of 25
2005 21 November at 9:35am | IP Logged 
INTRODUCTION

I am grateful to Linu, beniaczek and NC for their corrections in the sections on variations, vocabulary and culture respectively.

Polish (język polski) is a Slavonic language spoken by approximately 43 million people worldwide. Polish is most closely related to Lower Sorbian, slightly less so to Czech, Slovak and Upper Sorbian and even less so to other Slavonic languages such as Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian and Bulgarian. It is the official language of Poland.

USEFULNESS

The usefulness of Polish is limited to Poland. For Polish communities outside Poland, one can usually communicate in other languages (e.g. one can usually communicate in English with Poles who live in the USA). As in many countries in Central Europe, ESL teaching is widespread and many young adults and teenagers speak at least some English. The present form of Poland's borders has existed only since 1945. Indeed Poland did not exist as a sovereign state from 1795 to 1919. During this period, the historical Polish territory was partitioned by Prussia, Austria and Russia. As such some elderly Poles speak varying degrees of German or Russian as a legacy of these partitions. During the Second Republic (1920-1939), the country was located slightly more to the east than the present version of the country. Indeed much of what is now western Poland was then part of Germany, while most of the eastern region of the Second Republic is now part of Lithuania, Belorussia and Ukraine. Given the proximity to Germany and Poland's ties to Germanic culture, a knowledge of German is still useful for Poles who work in tourism, politics and commerce. It is slightly more difficult to find speakers of English outside the larger Polish cities. As such, a prospective visitor to smaller Polish towns and villages should expect to encounter more people who speak only Polish. Those who had come of age during the communist period also learned Russian as part of the mandatory imposition of Soviet culture during the Cold War. However, it is understandable that many of these Poles refuse to speak Russian because of the association with the oppressive days of communism in addition to the animosity between Poles and Russians that has existed since the Middle Ages.

CHIC FACTOR

Generally Polish is not considered to be a chic language and it is not a very popular choice for language learners who wish to learn Slavonic languages. Russian seems to be the most popular Slavonic language chosen by foreign learners. Indeed, the number of Polish jokes and negative stereotypes that exist in the West (e.g. drunken Poles and their vodka, 'Piotrek' the Polish plumber who would supposedly steal all of the jobs in Western Europe if the EU constitution had been approved) only hurt the prestige of the language and its speakers. Fortunately, this negative attitude in the West has been changing slowly given the almost unanimous repsect and admiration for the late Pope John Paul II (born Karol Wojtyła in the town of Wadowice in southern Poland) and the growth of Poland's tourism industry. Of course, the situation is reversed if one travels to Poland or meets Poles anywhere in the world. Because of the slightly unfavourable view of foreigners toward Polish, Poles are often pleasantly surprised by foreigners' efforts to speak the language or their attempts to learn it. I've experienced this reaction first-hand during my travels to Poland and Poles are both proud and very appreciative when they hear outsiders speak their language. Admittedly, its exotic-looking words (ex. Zbigniew Brzeziński, Szczecin, Rzeczpospolita Polska, brzmi) do lend the language a certain visual allure.

ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE

"Poland has steadfastly pursued a policy of economic liberalization throughout the 1990s and today stands out as a success story among transition economies. Even so, much remains to be done, especially in bringing down unemployment. The privatization of small and medium-sized state-owned companies and a liberal law on establishing new firms has encouraged the development of the private business sector, but legal and bureaucratic obstacles alongside persistent corruption are hampering its further development. Poland's agricultural sector remains handicapped by surplus labor, inefficient small farms, and lack of investment. Restructuring and privatization of "sensitive sectors" (e.g., coal, steel, railroads, and energy), while recently initiated, have stalled. Reforms in health care, education, the pension system, and state administration have resulted in larger-than-expected fiscal pressures. Further progress in public finance depends mainly on reducing losses in Polish state enterprises, restraining entitlements, and overhauling the tax code to incorporate the growing gray economy and farmers, most of whom pay no tax. The government has introduced a package of social and administrative spending cuts to reduce public spending by about $17 billion through 2007. Additional reductions are under discussion in the legislature but could be trumped by election-year politics in 2005. Poland joined the EU in May 2004, and surging exports to the EU contributed to Poland's strong growth in 2004, though its competitiveness could be threatened by the zloty's appreciation. GDP per capita roughly equals that of the three Baltic states. Poland stands to benefit from nearly $13.5 billion in EU funds, available through 2006. Farmers have already begun to reap the rewards of membership via higher food prices and EU agricultural subsidies." (retrieved from CIA's profile of Poland as of August 30, 2005). GDP (estimated 2004): $463 billion US (Source)

TRAVEL OPPORTUNITIES

Warszawa (Warsaw) - capital and the most cosmopolitan Polish city. On one hand it resembles western capitals with its new skyscrapers and shining office buildings and hotels. On the other hand, much of its Old Town was rebuilt after the Second World War, and is a real treat for tourists with its old buildings, churches and museums. It also has a surprisingly large amount of parkland. The most notable parklands are those in Łazienki and Wilanów.

Kraków (Cracow) - second largest city and the most popular destination for tourists. Some are already calling it the 'New Prague'. Unlike most Polish cities, the architecture of its Old Town survived World War II and the Old Town's lively atmosphere is something that can only be experienced - not described. Wawel Castle, the symbol of Poland, is just south of Kraków's Old Town and is the burial site for many of its kings. Wawel acts as a figurative guardian of the Polish territories' former glory in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Wieliczka - site of the oldest salt mine in Poland and just 15 km from Kraków's center. The highlight of a tour through the mine is the large underground Chapel of St. Kinga.

Oświęcim-Brzezinka (Auschwitz-Birkenau) - a chilling but important stop for any tourist who plans to come to Poland. No additional comment needed.

Trójmiasto (Tri-City comprising the cities of Gdańsk, Sopot and Gdynia) - the most important urban area in northern Poland lying on the shores of the Baltic Sea. Gdańsk is a very interesting destination. In the Renaissance, it was the richest city in the Polish-Lithuanian Confederation as it was the center of the Confederation's trade in grain. The center of Gdańsk still contains many buildings and monuments dating from that era; some of which have a distinctly Germanic or Scandinavian appearance because of the city's historical links to the Hanseatic League. In more recent times, Gdańsk is the home of the Solidarity (Solidariność) movement lead by Lech Wałęsa. His was the first independent trade union in the communist world and its constant pressure on Poland's communist government during the 1980s eventually lead not only to the collapse of communism in Poland but also in the other Soviet satellites in Central and Eastern Europe. Sopot is arguably Poland's most popular resort and has a bit of a reputation as a partying town with its clubs, bars and casinos. Gdynia is much more utilitarian and until the 1920s was only a small fishing village. However in the 1930s, the Polish government ordered the construction of a port and today Gdynia is a bustling center for maritime trade and shipbuilding.

Zamość - a rather incongrouous town in rural southeastern Poland. This town was built in the Renaissance by Count Zamoyski as his vision of a perfect city. It was designed according to the latest architectural and urban planning techniques of Renaissance Italy and is a worthwhile stop for travellers. With some hyperbole, some brochures describe the town as the 'Padua of the North'. However, this does not detract from the town's beauty and uniqueness.

Wrocław - a thriving city in southwestern Poland and center of the historical region of Śląsk (Silesia). In some ways, it is similar to Kraków with its atmosphere and beautiful Old Town. However it is not as closely identified with Poland's past as it has changed hands between Poles, Czechs, Germans and Austrians. The overlapping of cultural influences does add to its charm and in some ways it is reminiscent of Gdańsk with its historical mixing of cultures.

Toruń - a sizeable city on the banks of the Wisła (Vistula River) and was a base for the Teutonic Knights in the Middle Ages. The legacy of the order can still be seen in the number of Gothic-style buildings located throughout the center of town. In fact, its Old Town is on UNESCO's list of world cultural sites. Toruń is also the birthplace of Mikołaj Kopernik (Nicholas Copernicus) and the city's citizens are proud of their hometown hero despite the fact that he had studied in Kraków and did much of his revolutionary work in astronomy while working in the towns of Olsztyn and Frombork.

Gniezno/Poznań - neighbouring towns that are considered the birthplace of the Polish kingdom (there are still arguments over which city was more important to the Polish kingdom's founding in the 10th century). Both towns have much old architecture and are worthy stops for any tourist. Poznań is much larger than Gniezno and is also known for holding trade fairs annually. Outside Gniezno, there is a small community called Biskupin which has an open-air museum and an annual exhibition and show showing life in the early years of Poland's existence (c. 1000 AD) when the ancestors of the Poles and their neighbours the Celts, Vikings and Germans lived in a more tribal society.

Zakopane - a resort in the southern mountainous region near the border with Slovakia. It is popular for skiing, hiking, biking, or just hanging out and is also the sanctuary of choice for various Polish intellectuals and artists.

Mazury (Masuria) - this region in the northeast is filled with lakes and forests. A paradise for lovers of nature and sailors.

Parks, and more parks - Poland has many national parks. The most familiar of which is Białowieża in the east along the border with Belorussia. Other parks include those near Kraków (Ojców), Bydgoszcz (Bory Tucholskie) and Zakopane (Tatrzanski).

Castles and more castles - Poland also has many castles (especially in the northern regions). In addition to those in Warszawa (Royal Castle) and Kraków (Wawel), others are at Malbork, Pieskowa Skała, Kórnik, Reszel and Olsztyn.

COUNTRIES

Poland (official language). It is also spoken by Polish immigrants and people of Polish origin who live around the world.

SPEAKERS

Approximately 37 million speakers of Polish live in Poland, the remaining 6 million live mainly in neighbouring countries (ex. Czech Republic, Ukraine), North America, Asia, Australia, South America and Israel. The USA has the largest number of Polish speakers outside Poland with approximately 2.5 million speakers.

VARIATIONS

Standard Polish is taught in all schools and used as the official language. It is based primarily on the dialect spoken around Warszawa and one can often rely on a knowledge of only the standard language when communicating with other Poles. However, there are Polish dialects and these are usually divided into four groups: Wielkopolski (Great Polish - western group), Małopolski (Little Polish - southern group), Mazowiecki (Mazovian - central group around Warszawa) and Śląski (Silesian - southwestern group). As one travels south towards Silesia, the language becomes more and more distinct from standard Polish and is part of a dialectal continuum with the Silesian (Lachian) dialects in the northeastern part of the Czech Republic and the northwestern part of Slovakia. The dialects spoken in extreme southern Silesia near Cieszyn sound like a mix of Czech, Polish and Slovak. Mention should also be made of the speech of the Kashubes in northwestern Poland. Depending on the source, the language of the Kashubes is either a dialect or a language. While Kashubian is most closely related to Polish, it is often distinct enough that many Poles have difficulty in understanding it. I have included a link to an informative website on Polish dialects at the end of this profile.

CULTURE

Polish jokes aside, Polish culture is quite rich and has given much to the rest of the world. In music, the most famous Pole is Fryderyk (Fréderic) Chopin who was born in Poland to a French father and Polish mother. Other classical notables include Szymanowski and Górecki. In science, we already know of Mikołaj Kopernik (Nicholas Copernicus) and his conclusions of a heliocentric universe which refuted the idea of a geocentric universe supported by the Church and conventional wisdom. The Poles can also count Maria Skłodowska-Curie (Marie Curie) in their pantheon of scientific figures. She was born in 1867 to a family of Polish intellectuals in Warszawa and lived there until she moved to Paris in 1891 for graduate studies. In film, we have the director Roman Polanski, while in literature we can count Nobel Prize winners in Literature in the form of Henryk Sienkiewicz (winner in 1905), Władysław Reymont (winner in 1924), Czesław Miłosz (winner in 1980) and Wisława Szymborska (winner in 1996). Lastly, in religion there was the papacy of Karol Wojtyła (Pope John Paul II) who guided Catholicism from 1978 to 2005 and provided the moral and spiritual voice of his oppressed compatriots during the 1980s when Poland was languishing under communist dictatorship.

Documents of Polish literature can be traced as far back as the Middle Ages but it was not until the Renaissance that (Middle) Polish began to be used frequently as a means of literary expression. Prior to this period most literary expression was in Latin. Notable Polish writers include Jan Kochanowski, Ignacy Krasicki, Adam Mickiewicz, Zygmunt Krasiński, Józef Ignacy Kraszewski, Cyprian Kamil Norwid, Juliusz Słowacki, Maria Konopnicka, Henryk Sienkiewicz, Bolesław Prus, Władysław Reymont, Stanisław Wyspiański, Witold Gombrowicz, Andrzej Stasiuk, Wiesława Szymborska, Czesław Miłosz and Olga Tokarczuk.

Polish film is no less accomplished than Polish literature after accounting for the fact that cinematography only began in earnest in the late 19th century. Poland's film industry is based in the central city Łódź and its film school counts directors Roman Polański and Krzysztof Zanussi as graduates. Other notable figures include directors Andrzej Wajda, Krzysztof Kieślowski and Agnieszka Holland and the actress Izabella Scorupco. Polish films of note include Wajda's "Popiół i diament", Polański's "Nóż w wodzie", "Miś" by Stanisław Bareja and "Faraon" by Jerzy Kawalerowicz.

DIFFICULTIES

For English speakers, the greatest difficulties in my opinion are:
1) Verbal aspect
2) Verbs of motion
3) Syntax
4) Nominal and adjectival declension
5) Vocabulary

GRAMMAR

Like most other Slavonic languages, Polish has elaborate inflections for nouns and adjectives.

There are seven cases for nouns and adjectives: nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, locative, instrumental and vocative.

There are two numbers: singular and plural

There are three genders: masculine, feminine and neuter with masculine divided further into animate and inanimate categories in the declensions of the nominative and accusative.

There are four moods: infinitive, indicative, conditional and imperative

There are two voices: active and passive

There are three tenses: past, present and future

There are two verbal aspects: imperfective and perfective (these aspects deal with the concept of whether the verb describes an action that was/is/will be repetitive/ongoing OR an action that was/is/will be completed.). This means that most actions are expressed with an imperfective and a corresponding perfective verb.

Because of Polish's inflective nature, personal subject pronouns are usually omitted unless the speaker wishes to emphasize or clarify the subject of a sentence.

Syntax is usually subject-verb-object BUT this can change depending on the focus or nuance that a speaker wishes to convey. Thus, syntax can be rather flexible compared to English as much of the relevant grammatical information of a sentence is revealed in the inflections, suffixes and prefixes of the words.

Adjectives can precede or follow the nouns that they describe. This depends on whether the adjective describes an intrinsic quality of the noun.

For intrinsic qualities, the adjective follows the noun.
Ex. język polski = Polish language (literally 'language polish' - the reasoning is that there is only one Polish language)

For non-intrinsic qualities, the adjective precedes the noun.
Ex. czerwony samolot = red airplane (literally 'red airplane' - the reasoning is that the colour of an airplane is not an intrinsic quality)

Sometimes the order can be expressed both ways.
Ex. impreza urodzinowa OR urodzinowa impreza = birthday party (literally 'party birthday' OR 'birthday party' - Both versions are acceptable)

In addition, adjectives must agree with the nouns that they describe:

mały chłopiec = small boy (masculine animate nominative singular)

duży zeszyt = big notebook (masculine inanimate nominative singular)

mała dziewczyna = small girl (feminine nominative singular)

czerwone auto = red car (neuter nominative singular)

mali chłopcy = small boys (masculine animate nominative plural)

duże zeszyty = big notebooks (masculine inanimate nominative plural)

małe dziewczyny = small girls (feminine nominative plural)

czerwone auta = red cars (neuter nominative plural)

PRONUNCIATION

Stress in Polish is usually fixed on the penultimate (second-last) syllable of words. Exceptions are in some loanwords and certain conjugated verbal forms. All of the vowels are short. Exceptionally, Polish has nasal vowels unlike the other modern Slavonic languages. These nasal vowels are somewhat similar to those in French and Portuguese. The Proto-Slavonic language had nasal vowels and Polish is the only daughter language to have retained this type of sound.

In spite of this, Polish pronunication is rather simple and phonetic despite the intimdating appearance to those unaccustomed to consonant clusters, acute accents, tails and dots.

VOCABULARY

Polish vocabulary is generally quite removed from that of English even though both languages are both Indo-European languages.

dwa = two

trzy = three

cztery = four (it's a distant link - only a linguist can explain how the 'cz-' is connected to 'f-' in 'four'.)

pięć = five

mleko = milk

woda = water

brat = brother

siostra = sister

syn = son

żona = wife (cf. English 'queen' - it's a distant cognate)

żyć = to live (cf. English 'quick' - it's a distant cognate)

śnieg = snow

ty, wy = you (singular), you (plural)

noc = night

godzina = hour (cf. English 'good' - it's a distant cognate)

nos = nose

jutro = tomorrow

dzisiaj = today

wczoraj = yesterday

In addition to the native Slavonic vocabulary, Polish has borrowed many words from other languages, especially Czech, German and French. Latin loanwords exist also primarily because of the influence of Roman Catholicism. English loanwords are more prevelant in contemporary Polish than in older varieties of Polish because of the influence of American pop culture, the internet and sports.

ex. hańba = shame (cf. Czech 'hanba'), brama = gate (cf. Czech 'brána')

ex. szlachta = nobility (cf. German 'Geschlecht'); cukier = sugar (cf. German 'Zucker')

ex. koszmar = nightmare (cf. French 'cauchemar'), bilet = ticket (cf. French 'billet'), makijaż = makeup (cf. French 'maquillage')

ex. komputer, internet, menedżer (manager), tost (toast - i.e. toasted bread), kick-boxing, didżej (DJ)

TRANSPARENCY / INTELLIGIBILITY TO PEOPLE KNOWING OTHER LANGUAGES

Most English-speaking learners will find little in Polish that is instantly familiar at the outset apart from most of the Polish alphabet and the occasional internationalism (e.g. hotel, komputer, policja).

Polish is intelligible in varying degrees to native speakers of other Slavonic languages without courses or special training, although this "untrained intelligibility" isn't that high unless one speaks Kashubian. Here are some hints that may help with making sense of Polish for people speaking at least one Slavonic language other than Polish.

1) The Late-Common Slavonic cluster of *-tj- evolved into -c- in Czech, Polish and Slovak.

e.g.
*světja > svíce (Czech); świeca (Polish); svieca (Slovak) "candle" (cf. sv(ij)eća (BCMS/SC); свеча (Russian))

2) The Late-Common Slavonic sequence of initial *je- is preserved in Czech, Polish, Slovak and BCMS/Serbo-Croatian.

*(j)edinъ > jeden (Czech, Polish, Slovak); jedan (BCMS/SC) "one" (cf. один (Russian, Ukrainian), ena (Slovenian))

3) The Late-Common Slavonic cluster of *-dj- became -dz- as in Slovak.

e.g.
*medju > między (Polish); medzi (Slovak) "between" (cf. među (BCMS/SC); mezi (Czech); между (Russian))

4) The Late-Common Slavonic *g is retained as in BCMS/SC, Bulgarian, Lower Sorbian, Russian, and Slovenian. In the remaining Slavonic languages it has become "h". This is also tied to why 'h' does not occur frequently in Polish.

e.g.
głowa (Polish, Kaszubian); glava (BCMS/SC, Slovenian); глава (Bulgarian, Macedonian); гoлoва (Russian) "head" (Cf. галава (Belorussian - pronounced 'halava'); hlava (Czech, Slovak); гoлoва (Ukrainian - pronounced 'holova'))

5) Polish stress is generally fixed on the second-last syllable as in Rusyn, and dialects in northeastern Czech Republic ("Lachian") and eastern Slovakia.

6) All Polish vowels are the same short length like in Belorussian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian and Ukrainian.

7) The reflexive pronoun "się" can be included in verbal nouns as in Slovak.

e.g.

uczyć się / uczenie się (Polish); učiť sa / učenie sa (Slovak) "to learn" / "[the] learning" (Cf. učit se / učení (Czech))

8) Polish verbs of motion are similar to those of Belorussian, Czech, Russian and Ukrainian in that motion on foot uses a different verb from motion with a vehicle.

e.g.

idę (Polish); іду (Belorussian, Ukrainian); jdu (Czech); иду (Russian) "I go [on foot]" (Cf. idem (BCMS, Slovak); ида (Bulgarian))

jadę (Polish); еду (Belorussian, Russian); jedu (Czech); ïду (Ukrainian) "I go [by vehicle]" (Cf. idem (BCMS, Slovak); ида (Bulgarian))

9) Polish can express the future of an imperfective verb by combining the future tense of "to be" and the quasi-past participle as in Slovenian. (N.B. The defined future tense in BCMS/SC (called "futur II") also uses this combination although it does not convey the same nuance of general future activity as in Polish and Slovenian)

e.g. będę widział(a) (Polish); bum videl(a) (Slovenian) "I will be seeing" (Cf. vidjet ću (BCMS/SC); буду видеть (Russian); budem vidieť (Slovak))

10) As in Belorussian, Russian, Slovak and Ukrainian, the Polish accusative plural endings for adjectives and nouns denoting masculine humans are the same as those for the genitive plural (in fact this concept is taken further in Russian in that all animate (i.e. masculine or feminine, animal or human) nouns and adjectives in accusative plural take genitive plural endings).

e.g.

"I see new [male] students"
Ja widzę nowych studentów (Polish)
Я бачу новых студэнтаў (Belorussian)
Я вижу новых студентов (Russian)
Ja vidím nových študentov (Slovak)
Я бачу нових студентів (Ukrainian)

versus...

Ja vidim nove studente (BCMS/SC)
Aз виждам нови студенти (Bulgarian)
Ja vidím nové studenty (Czech)
Jac гледам нови студенти (Macedonian)
Jaz vidim nove študente (Slovenian)

SPELLING

Polish spelling is quite phonetic but there are a few exceptions. For example, a final 'ę' in a word such as 'się' is often pronounced as 'e' (i.e. without nasalization). Polish has the same alphabet as English without 'v'. The special characters in Polish are: ą, cz, ć, ę, ł, ń, ó, rz, sz, ś, ż, ź.

TIME NEEDED

According to FSI, it takes approximately 1100 class hours to acheive professional speaking and reading proficiency in Polish.

Naturally, the time needed will vary on each person's level of motivation, background in other Slavonic languages, access to material and environment. Given such factors, the time needed to acheive professional speaking and reading proficiency in Polish can take as little as a year to as much as infinity. ;-)

SCHOOLS

Polish classes for foreigners are relatively plentiful. In general there are universities which offer degree programs in Polish studies including formal instruction in the language or intensive summer courses. Examples include the school of Polish language at the Jagiellonian University of Kraków and the Center of Polish Language and Culture for Foreigners at Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. There are many private companies or dedicated language schools that offer Polish classes for foreigners. These are becoming noticeable in the UK and Ireland with the influx of Polish workers and the growing interest among natives of the UK and Ireland to learn Polish. Universities outside Poland that offer classes in Polish include the School of Slavonic and Eastern European Studies in London, University of Toronto, University of Michigan, UCLA, Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia), and the University of Auckland (New Zealand).

BOOKS

1) Teach Yourself Polish (Nigel Gotteri and Joanna Michalak-Gray) (price: approx $35 US)
- It comes with two CDs or audio cassettes and a textbook.
- What I enjoyed most about this course was that it had lively dialogues and useful information on grammar. It also comes with exercises for each chapter and answers at the back of the book.
- What I enjoyed least about this course was that its presentation of grammar was somewhat unstructured and could intimidate the learner at first. In the interest of keeping lively dialogues, it's natural that the language used would have relatively complex structures for a beginner and some idioms. The grammar section of each chapter would focus on the grammatical aspects of each set of dialogues. It would have been desirable if the textbook had included more exercises.

2) Colloquial Polish (Bolesław Masur) (price: approx $45 US)
- It comes with two CDs or audio cassettes and a textbook.
- What I enjoyed about this course was that it had good dialogues (perhaps not as lively as those used in the Teach Yourself course) and useful information on grammar. It also comes with exercises for each chapter and answers at the back of the book.
- Compared to the Teach Yourself course, 'Colloquial Polish' has a somewhat better presentation of grammar since the dialogues are designed in a way to emphasize the grammar or theme of a given chapter. It would have been desirable if the textbook had included more exercises. As a first step, Colloquial Polish would probably be a slightly better starting point for the absolute beginner because of its better presentation.

3) Pimsleur's Polish Comprehensive I (price: between $150 US to $250 US)
- It comes with 16 CDs and a small primer
- What I enjoy about this course is that you can acquire a reasonably good accent of basic phrases after going through its exercises of reading the primer and repeating after the speaker.
- This is a typical Pimsleur course in that the focus is on correct pronounciation and acquiring a small stock of short sentences and vocabulary. Unfortunately, it is expensive and I don't consider the benefit as greater than the cost. If you're an absolute beginner and interested in gaining a satisfactory overall introduction but feel intimidated by more involved introductory courses (ex. 'Beginning Polish' by Alexander Schenker or 'First-Year Polish' by Swan), I would start with 'Teach Yourself Polish' or 'Colloquial Polish'.

4) First-Year Polish (Oscar Swan) (price: variable)
- It comes with 5 audio cassettes (first edition) or 6 CDs or audio cassettes (second edition) and a textbook (first or second edition).
- The audio for the book is also available as .aiff files from the same domain at the University of Pittsburgh that hosts Prof. Swan's learning material for Polish (see "Links" at the bottom of this profile for the URL).
- What I enjoy about this set is that it is full of exercises, dialogues and explanations and you can acquire a reasonably good grasp of basic Polish after going through the course. Unfortunately, this set is really meant for university students and does not have a key for the exercises. You'll need to get a Polish friend or teacher to correct your exercises or help you with the exercises that ask for oral participation.
- As an alternative, Dr. Swan has updated this course and set it up online as 'First-Year Polish Course' at his website (see "Links" at the bottom of this profile for the URL). You can print the textbook (provisional online third edition) and do the exercises online with his proprietary software called 'Lektorek'. In addition, half of the dialogues can be played on the internet using Quick Time player. The website also has links to useful sites for students of Polish including an online version of the revised edition of his earlier work: "A Grammar of Contemporary Polish".

5) Intermediate Polish (Oscar Swan) (price: variable)
- It comes with 2 audio casettes and a textbook. You can get the textbook from Amazon or Alibiris.com. You can order the set of tapes with the textbook from an organization called Lektorek which is affiliated with Dr. Swan. It is the continuation of his course "First-Year Polish"
- Like 'First-Year Polish', this set is also full of exercises, dialogues and explanations which will help reinforce and improve your knowledge of Polish. Unfortunately, this set is really meant for university students and does not have a key for the exercises. You'll need to get a Polish friend or teacher to correct your exercises or help you with the exercises that ask for oral participation.
- Unfortunately, Dr. Swan has not created an online version of this course.

6) "Beginning Polish" (Alexander Schenker) (price: variable)
- This course is the nearest to that of a FSI Basic Course for Polish.
- It comes with two books. Vol. 1 is a textbook with basic sentences, grammatical notes and a few exercises.
- Vol. 2 is a workbook that is full of drills and also has a glossary and summary of Polish grammar. The drills are similar to the "Substitution" or "Transformation Drills" that are in FSI Basic Courses.
- The audio drills and recordings for the books are available for free download as MP3 files from Yale University (see "Links" at the bottom of this profile for the URL).
- Like a lot of FSI courses, the material is presented fairly drily and be aware that its method of drilling may bore some people.
- Vol. 1 is usually easy to find on Amazon or bookfinder.com but the price seems to vary between $20 and $50 US. Vol. 2 is somewhat harder to find and consequently is often a little more expensive than Vol. 1.

7) Cześć, jak się masz? (Władyslaw Miodunka) (2nd edition) (cz. 1 (part 1) "Spotykamy się w Polsce" and cz. 2 (part 2) "Spotykamy się w Europie")
- The first edition is a set of one book and its CD. price is approx. $25 US)
- The second edition is a set of two books, each with its own CD. (Each part costs about $35 US)
- (My comments are taken from my experiences with the first edition) What I enjoy about this set is that it has many exercises (but not as many as Swan's books), dialogues and explanations and you can acquire a reasonably good grasp of basic Polish after going through the course. Unfortunately, this set is really meant for university students and does not have a key for the exercises. You'll need to get a Polish friend or teacher to correct your exercises or help you with the exercises that ask for oral participation.
- It would have been desirable if the textbook had included even more exercises, but this is a relatively minor complaint.
- Part 1 of the 2nd edition is meant for students at level A1 on ALTE's scale, while Part 2 of the 2nd edition is meant for students at level A2 on the same scale.

8) Z polskim na ty (Ewa Lipińska) (price: approx $30 US)
- This book comes with 1 or 2 CDs, depending on the edition.
- This is a continuation of 'Cześć, jak się masz?', and is also full of exercises, dialogues and explanations which will help reinforce and improve your knowledge of Polish. This set is really meant for university students even though it does come with an answer key in the back and can be useful for those who are learning on their own.
- It would have been desirable if the textbook had included even more exercises, but this is a relatively minor complaint.
- It's meant for students at level B1 on ALTE's scale.

9) Kiedyś wrócisz tu... cz. I (part I); cz. 2 (part II) (Ewa Lipińska and Elżbieta Grażyna Dąmbska) (price: approx. $35 US each)
- Each book comes with a CD and a textbook.
- Both parts form a continuing sequence from 'Z polskim na ty', and are also full of exercises, dialogues and explanations which will help reinforce and improve your knowledge of Polish. This set is really meant for university students but it does have a key for about half of the exercises. You'll need to get a Polish friend or teacher to correct your other exercises or help you with the exercises that ask for oral participation.
- It would have been desirable if the textbooks had included even more exercises, but this is a relatively minor complaint.
- Part I is meant for students at level B2 on ALTE's scale, while Part II is meant for students at level C1 on the same scale.

10) Przygoda z gramatyką. Fleksja i słowotwórstwo imion. Ćwiczenia funkcjonalno-gramatyczne dla cudzoziemców (Józef Pyzik) (price: approx. $25 US)
- It is a textbook giving a good description of Polish nominal and adjectival declension with charts and examples. It also has lots of drills and includes a full key to all exercises.
- What I enjoy about it is that its full of drills and includes answers. This is perfect for mastering (or at least memorizing) the mechanics of cases.
- This book is entirely in Polish and isn't very useful to absolute beginners learning on their own. Such a learner might be overwhelmed by the explanations of fine grammatical points in Polish.
- It's meant for students at levels B2 and C1 on ALTE's scale.

11) Czas na czasownik (Piotr Garncarek) (price: approx. $25 US)
- It is a textbook giving brief descriptions of Polish verbal conjugation with charts and examples. Each chapter begins with a text that uses only certain verbs according to their conjugation pattern. The subsequent exercises all involve verbs with the same conjugation pattern. It also includes a full key to all exercises.
- What I enjoy about it is that its full of drills and includes answers. This is perfect for mastering (or at least memorizing) the conjugations and understanding aspects.
- This book is entirely in Polish and isn't very useful to absolute beginners learning on their own. Such a learner might be overwhelmed by the explanations of grammatical points in Polish.
- It's meant for students at level B1 on ALTE's scale.

12) Iść czy jechać? Ćwiczenia gramatyczno-semantyczne z czasownikami ruchu (Józef Pyzik) (price: approx. $25 US)
- It is a textbook giving a good description of Polish verbs of motion with charts and examples. It also has lots of drills and includes a full key to all exercises.
- What I enjoy about it is that it's full of drills and includes answers. This is perfect for mastering (or at least absorbing) that terror of Slavonic languages: verbs of motion.
- This book is in Polish and English and can be a useful supplement for absolute beginners learning on their own and highly recommended for more advanced learners of the language.
- It's meant for students at levels B2 and C1 on ALTE's scale.

13) Praktyczny słownik łączliwości składniowej czasowników polskich (Stanisław Mędak) (Practical Dictionary of Polish Conjugation of Verbs) (price: approx. $40 US)
- This is an excellent guide to using Polish verbs.
- It's different from Barron's guides for verb conjugations in other languages (e.g. 501 Russian verbs, etc.) (q.v.)
- Its entries show information for 1001 verbs as it pertains to case governance and associated prepositions using examples. It also presents information on subtle changes arising from stem mutations or prefixes which are part of Polish verbal aspect.
- It is entirely in Polish and thus may be more accessible for those who are past the beginner's stage of learning Polish.

14) 301 Polish Verbs (Klara Janecki) (price: approx. $20 US)
- A handy reference of Polish verbs giving patterns of conjugation for 301 verbs, and holding an index showing over 2300 verbs, each of which is linked to a verb table in the main section.
- It's the Polish version of other books by Barrons (e.g. "501 French Verbs", "501 Russian Verbs", etc.)

15) Polish: An Essential Grammar (Dana Bielec) (price: approx. $30 US)
- A useful reference book on Polish grammar. It is rather easier to understand than Swan's online reference grammar. Alas Bielec's book isn't as comprehensive as Swan's reference and isn't free. ;-)
- Bielec has also written two other books 'Basic Polish: A Grammar and Workbook' (approx. $30 US) and 'Intermediate Polish: A Grammar and Workbook' (approx. $35 US) which are textbooks that have exercises for each chapter. While both of Bielec's books have solutions for the exercises, there aren't as many exercises in them as in the books by Pyzik and Garncarek.

16) Collins słownik angielsko-polski and Collins słownik polsko-angielski (edited by Dr. Jacek Fisiak) (price: approx. $30 US)
- It's a two volume set edited by Jacek Fisiak and is the most useful and accessible medium two-way dictionary for learners of Polish.
- It not only includes many idioms and colloquialisms in its entries, but it also indicates the genitive singular form of every noun and important information for the verbs. For the verbs, the imperfective-perfective aspectual pair for each verbal entry is shown along with the conjugation endings in present tense for the 1st person singular ('I') and 2nd person singular ('you') in the Polish-English section. In some cases, it also indicates the declensions and conjugations of exceptional nouns and irregular verbs respectively in the Polish-English section.
- There is also a smaller and slightly cheaper version of this dictionary in one volume which is obtainable in North America at approximately $30 Canadian or $25 US.

17) Nowy słownik polsko-angielski, angielsko-polski Fundacji Kościuszkowskiej (edited by Dr. Jacek Fisiak) (price: approx. $120 US)
- It's also a two-volume set edited by Jacek Fisiak and is the largest two-way dictionary for learners of Polish.
- You could think of this set as a much larger version of the two-volume set from Collins and includes even more entries and examples. Strangely, it does not indicate the imperfective-perfective aspectual pair for each verbal entry in the Polish-English section. This lessens its utility for learners.

18) Wielki słownik angielsko-polski & Wielki słownik polsko-angielski. (Great English-Polish Dictionary & Great Polish-English Dictionary - edited by Jan Stanisławski et al.) (price: variable) (Most of the content of this review deals with the older edition. I do not own the newer edition of this set.)
- This dictionary is a set of four volumes (A to O and P to Z for English-Polish and A to Ó and P to Ź for Polish-English).
- You can find the older edition from the 1970s in a bookshop that specializes in used books or through bookfinder.com. Depending on the condition of the set, the price can cost anywhere from a few dollars to infinity. :-)). The newer edition from the 1990s is much more expensive and costs about $250 US brand new.
- What I like most about this set of dictionaries is that it is quite comprehensive. In addition, most entries include useful examples showing idiomatic usage and prepositions and cases that are governed by the verbs where applicable.
- In the Polish-English volumes, Stanisławski et al. have matched every imperfective verb with its perfective counterpart where applicable. For irregular verbs and verbs whose conjugations cannot be easily deduced, these same volumes show the conjugational pattern of the present tense and sometimes other forms such as the past participle, present adjectival participle and the imperative.
- The appendices of the Polish-English dictionary have a list of abbreviations and an abstract on Polish grammar with charts of declensions and conjugations in English and Polish.
- What I find somewhat less useful is that this set of dictionaries shows only the genitive plural of most nouns. Unfortunately, the respective forms of the nominative plural and the genitive singular are rarely presented in the dictionary. (Collins English-Polish-English dictionaries DO show these forms, however.)
- In my experience, it makes a little more sense to show the noun's form in the genitive singular since it is often more difficult to predict the genitive singular of a Polish noun (especially for masculine nouns) than the form in the genitive plural.
- In spite of these drawbacks, I find that this dictionary is still worth having and the newer editions would be a very good alternative to the new large dictionary that is sponsored by the Kościuszko Foundation.

19) Berlitz Polish Dictionary: Polish-English/English-Polish (edited by Berlitz) (price: approx. $10 US)
- In case that you can't get the medium or small dictionary by Fisiak, this dictionary from Berlitz will do in a pinch. It has the added advantage of being quite cheap
- It does not have quite as many idioms and colloquialisms in its entries as the small dictionary published by Collins, but it does indicate the genitive singular form of every noun and the imperfective-perfective aspectual pair for every verbal entry where applicable.

*** I do not recommend the small or medium dictionaries that are edited by Iwo Cyprian Pogonowski, With all due respect to Mr. Pogonowski, his dictionaries are little more than word lists and are not very useful for most learners of Polish. Unlike the dictionaries that are edited by Fisiak or Stanisławski et al. and the Berlitz pocket dictionary, Pogonowski does NOT indicate the genitive singular form in entries for nouns or the imperfective-perfective pairs in the entries for verbs. Instead he gives only the gender of every noun and phonetic transliterations of the Polish words. ***

LINKS

Discussions, posts or logs on HTLAL involving Polish
- Chung at work / Chung pri práci
- "Easy" Slavic Language?
- Free advanced Polish materials
- Good place to get Polish materials?
- Is Polish really that hard?
- 'jest' vs. 'to jest' (Polish)
- Learning sequence - Czech, Polish, Hungarian
- Old Linguaphone Polish
- Playing with Polish
- Polish: another attempt
- Polish in 4 Weeks
- Polish language learning tapes
- Polish music recommendations?
- Polish or Russian?
- Polish radio
- Polish - the most similar language?
- Polish video on demand
- Porozmawiajmy po polsku :)
- Russian and Polish
- Slavic Language Family Learning Sequence
- The age old question - Polish or Russian?
- ż in żona / rzeka contrast?

Other forums
- PolishForum.com's forums for discussions on Polish in general and Polish grammar
- Unilang's discussion forum for Polish
- WordReference's discussion forum for Polish

General collections of links
- A wide-ranging website on many aspects of the language (e.g. grammar, online courses, education, professional organizations, media).
- Long list of links related to Poland maintained by University College London

General treatment and descriptions of Polish's learning difficulty
- A good but brief description of Polish
- Wikipedia's article on Polish

Dictionaries and other databases
- Online collection of Polish dictionaries
- Słownik języka polskiego or online monolingual dictionary of Polish which gives inflectional tables for words entered by the user
- Online verb conjugator in several languages. Click on the Polish flag for list of Polish verbs and their conjugational tables.
- Online explanatory dictionary of Polish slang (mostly in Polish)
- Wikisłownik - Polish version of Wiktionary with most entries displaying inflected forms under “Odmiana” and aspectual counterparts (for verbs only)

Online courses, downloadable material and lists of available courses
- A brief evaluation of various textbooks and references for English-speaking learners of Polish.
- Website of Professor Oscar Swan's Polish material at the University of Pittsburgh
- Audio/Video for the online edition of "First-Year Polish" as .mp3 and .mov files (as of Jan. 2013 only up to Unit 9) and audio for the second edition of "First-Year Polish" as .aiff files at the website of Prof. Swan's linked above.
- Website at Yale University which hosts audio for Alexander Schenker's "Beginning Polish" as .mp3s
- "Polish Basic Course" from Defense Language Institute hosted at ERIC (text only - Warning: LARGE download which consists of almost 3200 pages or about 95 MB)
- Online courses for a few European languages, including Polish
- "Reading Authentic Polish Vol. 1" hosted at ERIC (text only)
- "Reading Authentic Polish Vol. 2" hosted at ERIC (text only)
- "Polish: Individualized Instruction Units 1-5" hosted at ERIC (text only)
- "Polish: Individualized Instruction Units 6-10" hosted at ERIC (text only)
- "Polish: Individualized Instruction Units 11-15" hosted at ERIC (text only)
- "Polish: Individualized Instruction Units 16-20" hosted at ERIC (text only)
- "FSI Communicating in Polish" hosted at ERIC (text only)
- "Concise Polish Grammar" by R. F. Feldstein
- Polish section of the website of Slavic Languages and Literatures at University of Michigan. Highlights include notes on grammar and list of private and public institutions offering courses in Polish language and culture during the summer.

Information on dialects
- A website on Polish dialects (in Polish only).
- A website about the Teshen Silesian dialect spoken in the northeastern part of the Czech Republic around Těšin (Czeski Cieszyn).

Literature and authentic texts
- Online collection of literary texts and classics of Polish literature
- Online collection of children's literature in Polish from the International Children's Digital Library

Bookstores that carry Polish inventory or material of interest for learners of Polish (N.B. far from exhaustive)
- Albertus
- Bay Foreign Language Books Ltd.
- Dom Książki
- Eden Polish Bookstore
- Empik
- Księgarnia Eva
- Księgarnia Polska
- Matras
- Polbook.com
- Polimex Bookstore
- The Polish Bookstore
- Polish Bookstore in Ottawa
- Polonia.com
- Schoenhof's

Downloadable/streamed media
- Lists of radio stations and television stations in Poland (stations' websites have content that is playable as a stream).

Edited by Chung on 2013 09 January at 6:37am

17 persons have voted this message useful



Kubelek
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Switzerland
chomikuj.pl/Kuba_wal
Joined 5359 days ago

415 posts - 528 votes 
Speaks: Polish*, EnglishC2, French, Spanish
Studies: German

 
 Message 2 of 25
2006 25 February at 5:53pm | IP Logged 
are you still working on it? why isn't it posted? (it's been a while since the last edit)

If it's just because of Francois's lack of time - I'm sorry to nag.
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5663 days ago

4228 posts - 8256 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 3 of 25
2006 27 February at 3:04pm | IP Logged 
I finished it in November. I sent a private message to Francois once I had done it and he replied to the message. However, I think that he has been too busy to post it with the other languages and so the Polish profile still sits here.
1 person has voted this message useful



Linu
Triglot
Newbie
Poland
Joined 5334 days ago

3 posts - 3 votes
Speaks: Polish*, English, Russian
Studies: French, Spanish

 
 Message 4 of 25
2006 17 March at 5:24pm | IP Logged 
A very thoroughly prepared presentation - it's been a pleasure to read.
However, I've spotted one tiny mistake in the paragraph about regional variations of Polish. 'Mazovian' is not 'Mazowski' but 'Mazowiecki'. Another annoying exception :)

Rgds,
Ewelina
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5663 days ago

4228 posts - 8256 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 5 of 25
2006 20 March at 10:11am | IP Logged 
Dziekuje za korekte i komplement, Ewelino! :-)
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Linu
Triglot
Newbie
Poland
Joined 5334 days ago

3 posts - 3 votes
Speaks: Polish*, English, Russian
Studies: French, Spanish

 
 Message 6 of 25
2006 29 March at 3:38am | IP Logged 
Prosze uprzejmie :)
Wyrazy uznania za stworzenie profilu dotyczcego jezyka polskiego! Nieczesto sie zdarza, by rodzimy uzytkownik j. angielskiego uczyl sie polskiego, a nie na odwrot :)
Chociaz mimo wszystko uwazam, ze to dobrze, iz nie jest odwrotnie. Polski jest jednym z trudniejszych jezykow slowianskich, a w niektorych kwestiach (np. ortografia) nawet Polacy maja watpliwosci ;)

Pozdrawiam serdecznie,
Ewelina
1 person has voted this message useful



beniaczek
Tetraglot
Newbie
Poland
Joined 5273 days ago

4 posts - 4 votes
Speaks: Polish*, English, German, Russian
Studies: Swedish

 
 Message 7 of 25
2006 19 May at 1:10pm | IP Logged 
Chung wrote:
ona = woman

No, 'zona' you should translate as 'wife'. 'Woman' is in polish 'kobieta'. Only sometimes you can tranlsate 'zona' as 'woman'.
1 person has voted this message useful



beniaczek
Tetraglot
Newbie
Poland
Joined 5273 days ago

4 posts - 4 votes
Speaks: Polish*, English, German, Russian
Studies: Swedish

 
 Message 8 of 25
2006 19 May at 1:16pm | IP Logged 
Linu wrote:
Prosze uprzejmie :)
Wyrazy uznania za stworzenie profilu dotyczcego jezyka polskiego!

Super by bylo aby to forum bylo kodowane w unicode... Mozna by pisac w kazdym jezyku uzywajac literek z kreseczkami, kropeczkami, itd...

Pozdrawiam.


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