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Has anybody tried the Gold List method?

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies Post Reply
222 messages over 28 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 11 ... 27 28 Next >>
Arekkusu
Hexaglot
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Canada
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 Message 81 of 222
22 March 2010 at 2:37pm | IP Logged 
Cainntear wrote:
The procedure and numbers are pretty specific, so I'm assuming that Uncle Davey has published his research...? No...?

It's quite fathomable that a person could try to test out their own theory and yet, not publish their research in a scientific magazine. It's also fathomable that small scale tests might have been conclusive, but that he hasn't had the time, energy or desire to perform scientific tests and to publish them. I'm not saying this makes his assumptions more credible, but the fact that he hasn't published a scientific report is of no bearing on the validity of his claims.

Besides, testing it out on a personal level will take little time, little effort and zero money.

Edited by Arekkusu on 22 March 2010 at 2:37pm

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Pyx
Diglot
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China
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 Message 82 of 222
22 March 2010 at 2:42pm | IP Logged 
Arekkusu wrote:
Cainntear wrote:
The procedure and numbers are pretty specific, so I'm assuming that Uncle Davey has published his research...? No...?

It's quite fathomable that a person could try to test out their own theory and yet, not publish their research in a scientific magazine. It's also fathomable that small scale tests might have been conclusive, but that he hasn't had the time, energy or desire to perform scientific tests and to publish them. I'm not saying this makes his assumptions more credible, but the fact that he hasn't published a scientific report is of no bearing on the validity of his claims.

Besides, testing it out on a personal level will take little time, little effort and zero money.

Well said. If something works I don't need scientific research to tell me that it works :) And if it works is being established by our brave forum members at the moment :)
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Arekkusu
Hexaglot
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Canada
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 Message 83 of 222
22 March 2010 at 2:48pm | IP Logged 
Pyx wrote:
Well said.

I agree.
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Cainntear
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 Message 84 of 222
22 March 2010 at 2:54pm | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:
I'm not afraid of learning words by some 'headword form', as long as this form is all I need to know to produce the rest of the forms. Of course this is not always enough: with moderately irregular words or words whose quoted form isn't informative enough I may need a number of forms. I still remember the classical 3 or 4 forms of the irregular Latin verbs which I learnt in school forty years ago, and I can't see any more effective way to specify a Latin verb, apart from a few very irregular ones.

Asking for ALL forms to be presented at once is counterproductive - you will never learn a whole page of forms one by one, even though a native speaker or very advanced learner may have stored them like that in his/her brain.

OK, we have to make the distinction between irregular and regular here.

In a regular verb, the forms are all part of one whole. The process isn't just "headword->conjugation", as there are multifaceted links between different forms. The different forms are part of a continuous process, not just independent datapoints.

Quote:
The thing that I find puzzling about Uncle Davey's method is that he expects people to learn more with LESS exposure. Well, there is such a thing as taking a pause and return fresh and eager to restart your learning if you have exhausted yourself. But that's a special case. Quite generally I don't believe that doing nothing for two weeks is better than doing something.

If we consider the process, there might be something missing from his description: what the heck is his brain doing while he spends 20 minutes writing 25 words? It certainly won't sit and wait, because writing at this speed is not a mentally stimulating or fulfilling process....

I suspect he's developed a habit of focusing down and rolling those words about in his head, thereby "exposing" it actively. But we can't assume everyone will do this, and we can't teach people to do this.

Edited by Cainntear on 22 March 2010 at 2:55pm

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Arekkusu
Hexaglot
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Canada
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 Message 85 of 222
22 March 2010 at 3:03pm | IP Logged 
Cainntear wrote:
If we consider the process, there might be something missing from his description: what the heck is his brain doing while he spends 20 minutes writing 25 words? It certainly won't sit and wait, because writing at this speed is not a mentally stimulating or fulfilling process....

I suspect he's developed a habit of focusing down and rolling those words about in his head, thereby "exposing" it actively. But we can't assume everyone will do this, and we can't teach people to do this.

Are you suggesting that it's easy to get distracted during that time or that what he does mentally with those words during that time must be either well thought out or instinctively very effective?

Are you implying that the fact the method works for him lies not in the method itself but in his ability to process and acquire words efficiently?
1 person has voted this message useful



Cainntear
Pentaglot
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Scotland
linguafrankly.blogsp
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 Message 86 of 222
22 March 2010 at 6:31pm | IP Logged 
Arekkusu wrote:
It's also fathomable that small scale tests might have been conclusive, but that he hasn't had the time, energy or desire to perform scientific tests and to publish them. I'm not saying this makes his assumptions more credible, but the fact that he hasn't published a scientific report is of no bearing on the validity of his claims.

He doesn't even say how many people have tested it. You can't produce specific details without some kind of study, and even if he just made the study data available for scrutiny, even if not in a peer-reviewed journal, that would be better.

Arekkusu wrote:
Besides, testing it out on a personal level will take little time, little effort and zero money.

Testing everybody's pet theories on a personal level would take loads of time, loads of effort and loads of money.

So we "thin the herd" by making judgements on credibility. He needs to support his claims with data.
Arekkusu wrote:
Are you implying that the fact the method works for him lies not in the method itself but in his ability to process and acquire words efficiently?

Yes.
1 person has voted this message useful



Arekkusu
Hexaglot
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Canada
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 Message 87 of 222
22 March 2010 at 7:10pm | IP Logged 
None of the vocabulary acquisition methods presented on this site are backed up by any kind of empirical data or "study data available for scrutiny". (Well, that I know of.)

You can try none, or you can try one.
1 person has voted this message useful



Woodpecker
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United States
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 Message 88 of 222
22 March 2010 at 8:56pm | IP Logged 
I think this is kind of a silly argument. Yeah, the gold-list method is not peer-reviewed, highly counter-intuitive, and generally not incredibly credible. Nevertheless, it's interesting enough that a couple of us are willing to sacrifice a couple of hours a week for the next few months to see if it works for us. It's not scientific, you're right, and we won't be able to justifiably recommend that everyone switch to gold-listing immediately if we turn out to love it. Regardless, even this kind of test can be very helpful. Do you read Amazon reviews before you buy stuff? I bet you do. They're not exactly perfect, but they're still useful enough that everyone reads them. Not everything has to be double-blind and peer-reviewed to death to be valuable.


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