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Has anybody tried the Gold List method?

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies Post Reply
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Cainntear
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 Message 153 of 222
01 December 2010 at 1:13am | IP Logged 
Huliganov wrote:
I think I probably agree that accent is something which will not necessarily come optimally with mainly writing based study approaches.

I wasn't talking about "accent", but "pronunciation".

You mentioned two elements of pronunciation -- accent and prosody.

But there's more to it than that -- when people talk about "accent", it's a "nice to have", but if your sounds are very very wrong, they will never be understood. You cannot speak Spanish with English vowels.

And while we may engage in lots of written language, if we engage in any spoken language at all, we need to understand the phonology of the language.

We need to develop a grasp of the patterns of meaningful distinctions in a language. (eg Scottish Gaelic: there is no voiced/voiceless distinction -- T and D differ only in terms of aspiration (and mutation), as do C and G.)

There's the matter of phonotaxis as well, combinations of phonemes that are and aren't possible (Spanish words can't start sp- or sc-, for example).

Learning the underlying structure from the word go means you understand the language more like the native speaker intends it.
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Victor Berrjod
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 Message 154 of 222
01 December 2010 at 5:45pm | IP Logged 
The way I understood it, part of the trick is to see it as a fun hunt for "the most difficult word". I have just started, but I am planning on seeing it as a game. I will take words that I don't know, put them into a list, and see who wins for being the most difficult one.

I think it works better for languages written (more or less) phonemically, unlike Japanese, for example. Instead of having to learn how to spell the words, you need to learn which characters you're supposed to use, and in order to do that, you need to know the characters. I'm presently writing both the characters and their readings to see how that goes.
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LangOfChildren
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 Message 155 of 222
01 December 2010 at 6:36pm | IP Logged 
4 days ago I started learning Albanian, and I decided to give the Goldlist Method another try, this time using it from the very beginning.

I make two headlists of 25 words each per day taking the words out of my textbook.
This means that I will actually be seeing the words during the two weeks of waiting for the distillations, so I'm quite sure I will remember way more than 50% of them.
I do, however, still think that this will prove to be useful, because I won't miss the words that I neglected to pick up just from listening to and reading the lessons.
So in a way, I see it as a sort of back up for my other learning.

I'll keep you guys updated when something interesting happens or when someone wants to know something in more detail.
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TixhiiDon
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 Message 156 of 222
01 December 2010 at 11:30pm | IP Logged 
I've been using the method quite diligently for around two months now and I'm very
happy with it. I basically see it as a way of rounding up all the loose vocabulary
that one tends to pick up from various sources - textbooks, websites, TV, movies,
songs, classroom lessons, conversations with native speakers, and so on. Not only do
you get to write it all down in one place, you also go back to it regularly to see what
you have remembered and what has slipped through the cracks.

The main difficulty I have with this method, as I've written in my language learning
log, is that there is a huge amount of inconsistency in the number of words I remember
from the head lists. Sometimes I will remember only 1 or 2 words, and other times 15
or even 20. This of course makes it very difficult to create nice neat distillations.

Anyway, I'm up to 600 words now, and if even half of those have stuck in my long-term
memory I'll be very happy.
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Victor Berrjod
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 Message 157 of 222
03 December 2010 at 4:35pm | IP Logged 
I'm on my third day of using this method for Japanese, and while I know the meaning of most kanji already, knowing what readings to use is a problem. I have written 3 pages of 25 words each, with the furigana listed right next to the kanji. I realized that I'm sort of writing down 50 words this way. Would it be a better idea to have them separate, and maybe merge them when distilling if necessary?
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translator2
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 Message 158 of 222
03 December 2010 at 6:50pm | IP Logged 
I used to use a similar method. Although instead of re-writing the word lists, I would use a system of symbols and check marks to "distill" the vocabulary.

Edited by translator2 on 03 December 2010 at 6:51pm

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Huliganov
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 Message 159 of 222
12 December 2010 at 7:59pm | IP Logged 
Victor Berrjod wrote:
I'm on my third day of using this method for Japanese, and while I know the meaning of most kanji already, knowing what readings to use is a problem. I have written 3 pages of 25 words each, with the furigana listed right next to the kanji. I realized that I'm sort of writing down 50 words this way. Would it be a better idea to have them separate, and maybe merge them when distilling if necessary?


The use of Goldlist for Japanese is not as straightforward as it is for many languages. I'll tell you how I go about it, and you'll see if there's anything in there that can work for you. I'm of course referring to its use to learn Japanese properly, of course, not just being limited to the romaji offered on quite a few courses, which in my opinion is just a "taster stage" of the language.

In my view, if you are really comfortable with katakana and hiragana (like you could write me out the basic tables of the two, not necessarily the " ones and the pa, pi, etc, but the ha, hi, fu, etc) then you are overdoing it a bit by doing two lines per word.

A different story emerges when you start to do the kanji of course. There is a lot to remember, nothing like just one word in an alphabetised language.

In the headlist when I'm doing kanji I would be doing one line for the stroke order and meaning, the next line is the first of the on-yomies, and I write down one line with each of the on-yomies (following convention I put the katakana as well as the romaji, leaving hiragana to write the kun-yomies, which I also do giving each one their own line).

After that I put down the main combinations, which is very important. Here I write the romaji and kanji and meaning for each on a single line.

Then I do practice phrases showing how they are used (which means getting a kanji book that offers that on a kanji by kanji basis) I write the Romaji, the meaning and the Kanji on three lines per item.

So in the headlist a single kanji gets up to a full page sometimes.

In the first distillation, I do the stroke order first, but this time cutting out the phases in the stroke order which are obvious. It's a line like before, but a shorter line usually.

Then I put all on-yomies on one line, and all kunyomies on one line

I usually don't get to distill much on the combinations part in the first distillation, but if I'd well remembered something, of course I could leave it out.

In the practice sentence part, I don't write out the English meaning if I've remembered it, just the romaji and the sentence written in proper Japanese.

So much for the first distillation. Generally in the second I keep the stroke order, this time further simplified if I can get away with it without getting the order wrong, plus the kun and the on all on one line. I usually don't have to put the basic meaning of the kanji in any more at this stage.

I may get away with leaving out one or two more combinations, and the practice sentences can be just Japanese with the furigana over the unknown kanji that may be in the sentences.

And after that the distillation will be as normal.
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Huliganov
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 Message 160 of 222
12 December 2010 at 8:01pm | IP Logged 
TixhiiDon wrote:
I've been using the method quite diligently for around two months now and I'm very
happy with it. I basically see it as a way of rounding up all the loose vocabulary
that one tends to pick up from various sources - textbooks, websites, TV, movies,
songs, classroom lessons, conversations with native speakers, and so on. Not only do
you get to write it all down in one place, you also go back to it regularly to see what
you have remembered and what has slipped through the cracks.

The main difficulty I have with this method, as I've written in my language learning
log, is that there is a huge amount of inconsistency in the number of words I remember
from the head lists. Sometimes I will remember only 1 or 2 words, and other times 15
or even 20. This of course makes it very difficult to create nice neat distillations.

Anyway, I'm up to 600 words now, and if even half of those have stuck in my long-term
memory I'll be very happy.


Good to hear this.


2 persons have voted this message useful



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