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Has anybody tried the Gold List method?

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies Post Reply
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Victor Berrjod
Diglot
Groupie
Norway
no.vvb.no/
Joined 4231 days ago

62 posts - 110 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, English
Studies: Japanese, Korean, Ancient Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Mandarin, Cantonese

 
 Message 169 of 222
18 December 2010 at 4:03pm | IP Logged 
Some random words to show the format I'm using:

1. 昼寝 – ひるね
2. 昼寝 – nap, siesta
3. 熱い – あつい
4. 熱い – hot (objects, substances)
5. 眠る – ねむる
6. 眠る – to sleep
7. 熊 – くま
8. 熊 – bear
9. 寄る – よる
10. 寄る – to stop by
11. 氷山 – ひょうざん
12. 氷山 – iceberg

and so on. :)
The readings are in hiragana for Japanese, and when I start the Chinese one, it will be in pīnyīn, like Pyx's. For French, I don't need to add a reading, since it uses the Latin alphabet.

Edited by Victor Berrjod on 18 December 2010 at 5:16pm

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Huliganov
Octoglot
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Poland
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Speaks: English*, Polish, French, German, Russian, Spanish, Esperanto, Czech
Studies: Romanian, Turkish, Mandarin, Japanese, Hungarian

 
 Message 170 of 222
19 December 2010 at 11:38pm | IP Logged 
Victor Berrjod wrote:
Do mean me personally? I look at the target language for a few seconds, try to recall the meaning (and reading, if it's in kanji), and then see if I got it right. If it's a compound word, the reading is usually easier to remember, and if it's a single-kanji word, then the meaning is usually easier.

I think it's best to go L2 > L1, because you don't want to be translating L1 into L2 all the time. When you see the word, you don't need to remember its translation, but rather know how to use it. For example, when you see 氷山, you shouldn't think "Aha, that's an iceberg!", but rather see a picture of an iceberg in your mind, as well as effortlessly read ひょうざん. You want to be able to think in your target language. In my opinion, that is.

I just did the distillation of my fifth page, and I remembered ~30% of the entries. I didn't remember any of the first few ones, and was starting to get discouraged, but in the end, I did remember what I was supposed to. :)


Excellent. You may have been trying too hard at the outset and only getting relaxed later, but once you are relaxed with it, you'll see the effects. Do it the way you enjoy it at the pace you like to work.

I've written a little haiku just for you about it, in the hope that it will make me more like every European's new role model, our "beloved" "president" Mr Hermann von Rompuy:

The man radical
Relaxing near to a tree
So should our work be.


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Huliganov
Octoglot
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Poland
huliganov.tvRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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Speaks: English*, Polish, French, German, Russian, Spanish, Esperanto, Czech
Studies: Romanian, Turkish, Mandarin, Japanese, Hungarian

 
 Message 171 of 222
20 December 2010 at 12:03am | IP Logged 
Victor Berrjod wrote:
Some random words to show the format I'm using:

1. 昼寝 – ひるね
2. 昼寝 – nap, siesta
3. 熱い – あつい
4. 熱い – hot (objects, substances)
5. 眠る – ねむる
6. 眠る – to sleep
7. 熊 – くま
8. 熊 – bear
9. 寄る – よる
10. 寄る – to stop by
11. 氷山 – ひょうざん
12. 氷山 – iceberg

and so on. :)
The readings are in hiragana for Japanese, and when I start the Chinese one, it will be in pīnyīn, like Pyx's. For French, I don't need to add a reading, since it uses the Latin alphabet.


Ok. Well there are various conventions in the textbooks when it comes to learning Japanese, and hiragana is used to show the kun yomi and the okurigana (they usually put a spot in the middle to separate out the okurigana, similar to the one used in Chinese to show that a bunch of characters that may appear confusing is representing some gaijin's name.

The On Yomi or Sino-Japanese readings should have katakana. I tend to prefer to tackle for one kanji all the possible On-yomi and kun-yomi at once, and look at how the possible common combinations give me the clues as to whether I'm dealing with the one or the other, which is also helpful in cases where you get ateji and also where there is more than one kun- or on- or both -yomies. In the case of hyoozan, that is a Sino-Japanese compound, the home grown readings of those kanjies are koori and hi, of which the latter also appears in compounds like hisame - ice storm - see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AY_vR1xNxgo

That's why I prefer to take a more complete view of each kanji as I come across it. It is more pedestrian than your approach, but possibly it may avoid confusion for me later on.

But I'm no expert on Japanese, it is the toughest of the ones I've attempted, maybe I'm giving you bad advice.


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Victor Berrjod
Diglot
Groupie
Norway
no.vvb.no/
Joined 4231 days ago

62 posts - 110 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, English
Studies: Japanese, Korean, Ancient Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Mandarin, Cantonese

 
 Message 172 of 222
20 December 2010 at 9:26pm | IP Logged 
No, I think your way is a good one. :) Although it doesn't show in my example above, I try to go by kanji, using words with different readings for them. I'm not that interested in knowing the readings without knowing how to use them. I guess we use a similar approach, but I think you're being more systematic, maybe.

I have thought about writing only native Japanese readings in hiragana, but decided not to, since I can usually (though not always) tell if a reading is kun or on, and since I learn the readings by words anyway, most of the compounds will have on readings.

I like the haiku, by the way! I agree completely.
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slymie
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China
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Studies: Shanghainese, Uyghur, Russian

 
 Message 173 of 222
21 December 2010 at 9:21am | IP Logged 
Huliganov wrote:

The man radical
Relaxing near to a tree
So should our work be.



Answer = 休

my turn :

Water gives meaning
And then it must go
European country and a method


And back on topic, I started doing the gold lists with Russian, Straight out of the dictionary. I'm going to try it and I already have a lot of the words in my vocab, although most are very similar to English thus easy to remember (букет, бульдозер, белуга) I'm working from A-Z, and picking out any word that doesn't seem too bookish or rare. About 100 words per day so I can complete the dictionary at a reasonable pace.
1 person has voted this message useful



Victor Berrjod
Diglot
Groupie
Norway
no.vvb.no/
Joined 4231 days ago

62 posts - 110 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, English
Studies: Japanese, Korean, Ancient Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Mandarin, Cantonese

 
 Message 174 of 222
21 December 2010 at 12:57pm | IP Logged 
Oh, are you supposed to guess what haiku are about? OK, 法 (the country is France).
1 person has voted this message useful



Huliganov
Octoglot
Senior Member
Poland
huliganov.tvRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4477 days ago

91 posts - 304 votes 
Speaks: English*, Polish, French, German, Russian, Spanish, Esperanto, Czech
Studies: Romanian, Turkish, Mandarin, Japanese, Hungarian

 
 Message 175 of 222
21 December 2010 at 11:45pm | IP Logged 
Victor Berrjod wrote:
Oh, are you supposed to guess what haiku are about? OK, 法 (the country is France).


I think this learning Kanjis by Haikus could be a great corroboration of this group! It would conceivably become a useful adjunct to Heisig/Hoening!
Let's keep the ball rolling.

He stands with wide arms
To show how big he can be
With three strokes of pen
2 persons have voted this message useful



Huliganov
Octoglot
Senior Member
Poland
huliganov.tvRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4477 days ago

91 posts - 304 votes 
Speaks: English*, Polish, French, German, Russian, Spanish, Esperanto, Czech
Studies: Romanian, Turkish, Mandarin, Japanese, Hungarian

 
 Message 176 of 222
21 December 2010 at 11:50pm | IP Logged 
slymie wrote:
Huliganov wrote:

The man radical
Relaxing near to a tree
So should our work be.



Answer = 休

my turn :

Water gives meaning
And then it must go
European country and a method


And back on topic, I started doing the gold lists with Russian, Straight out of the dictionary. I'm going to try it and I already have a lot of the words in my vocab, although most are very similar to English thus easy to remember (букет, бульдозер, белуга) I'm working from A-Z, and picking out any word that doesn't seem too bookish or rare. About 100 words per day so I can complete the dictionary at a reasonable pace.


Great idea. You could also use the frequentative dictionary I show on the Russian books page on www.oioioio.com (if you buy it from there I think I'm on 6%, but do shop around, especially I'm in no mood to plug Amazon even with percents for me when they pulled the plug on wikileaks, but at least they show the product) this way will be sure to focus your earliest efforts on what will give you the greatest utility.

It goes through the alphabet at each rough phase of frequentative equality, rather than claim to have a precise measurement.


2 persons have voted this message useful



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