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Endelig norsk. Igjen. Alltid - TAC 2013

 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
338 messages over 43 pages: 1 24 5 6 7 ... 3 ... 42 43 Next >>
Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 17 of 338
14 August 2012 at 9:48pm | IP Logged 
I dag har jeg lærte den sekste leksjon fra Assimil. Naturligvis har jeg også lest den syvende, anmeldelse leksjon. Ettertid hørte jeg til en av mine favoritt sanger, Idyll fra Postgirobygget. Jeg hadde allerede oversatt tekste og kunne synge den, derfor har jeg spillte sangen bare en gang.

Jeg er glad å kunne lære fra Assimil, og det er veldig hyggelig når du henter en bok som du liker, som bare hadde hengt på sokkelen de siste fem årene, men jeg vil også snart lese bøker og skrive på norsk.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 18 of 338
16 August 2012 at 10:09pm | IP Logged 
I start to notice that Norwegian has far less silent letters that it seems at a first glance. Once you know the rules for the most evident cases, there are not many left, especially inside the words, and you can be confident to pronounce words with given rules. I bet the situation is much worse with Danish, so, I feel a bit relieved.

Assimil is still a bit slow, though it's ok to be so, because the words being introduced now are very important. I still don't know which book to follow next, maybe a quick review through Hugo's Norwegian In Three Months which is a fairly underrated textbook, or one of the TYs. I have TY Norwegian 1944, 1960 and 90's editions, but if I pick the old ones without audio (like the one that has texts, grammar and translation exercises, my favorite method for learning languages), I'll have to do a double-book schedule for Norwegian by choosing another book with audio, and that's not my idea now since Norwegian has been added as a 4th language to an already busy schedule. So, even though i'm tempted to pick old-school textbooks, I'd go for a modern one with audio first. Linguaphone, for instance, has an outdated language as it uses De, and I think I can skip it for other textbooks, considering that I don't plan to do that much textbook learning as I am doing for Georgian, for example.
1 person has voted this message useful



daegga
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Austria
lang-8.com/553301
Joined 4357 days ago

1076 posts - 1792 votes 
Speaks: German*, EnglishC2, Swedish, Norwegian
Studies: Danish, French, Finnish, Icelandic

 
 Message 19 of 338
16 August 2012 at 11:05pm | IP Logged 
pbromide wrote:
Took a look at the Wikipedia Norwegian page and if my understanding of IPA is like, then
the following description should be correct:

u - represented by /u/ or /ʉ/. /u/ sounds like French "ou." /ʉ/ sounds like Scottish
"moon."
y - represented by /ʏ/ or /y/. /y/ sounds like French "tu." /ʏ/ is to /I/ what /y/ is to
/i/, if that helps at all. It's the rounded version of the "i" sound in "bit."


Unfortunately, IPA has no adequate symbol for the pronunciation of the Norwegian (and Swedish) letter <y>. [y] is usually used, but the pronunciation is different than in other languages like German or French. It is pretty hard to describe, a Norwegian has to show you how it is done. The lips are put forward and tension is built up like in a German <ü>, but the lips are not really rounded but rather stretched to the side like an exaggerating unrounding (but it is very distinct from an /i/ because of the tension and the lips coming forward)

The central /ʉ/ is pretty much pronounced like you would learn in an phonetics textbook. Using this pronunciation instead of my German <ü> came naturally after some time without really trying ... I still have trouble pronouncing it in isolation (in phonetics class for example), but in the context of a Norwegian word I've heard often it comes naturally. So don't worry about this one.

Edited by daegga on 16 August 2012 at 11:06pm

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tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 4543 days ago

5310 posts - 9399 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 20 of 338
16 August 2012 at 11:29pm | IP Logged 
Yeah I hate pronouncing that vowel in Swedish too but it's all practice.
1 person has voted this message useful



Solfrid Cristin
Heptaglot
Winner TAC 2011 & 2012
Senior Member
Norway
Joined 5170 days ago

4143 posts - 8864 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, Spanish, Swedish, French, English, German, Italian
Studies: Russian

 
 Message 21 of 338
16 August 2012 at 11:30pm | IP Logged 
Expugnator wrote:
I dag har jeg lærte den sekste leksjon fra Assimil. Naturligvis har jeg også lest den
syvende, anmeldelse leksjon. Ettertid hørte jeg til en av mine favoritt sanger, Idyll fra Postgirobygget. Jeg
hadde allerede oversatt tekste og kunne synge den, derfor har jeg spillte sangen bare en gang.

Jeg er glad å kunne lære fra Assimil, og det er veldig hyggelig når du henter en bok som du liker, som bare
hadde hengt på sokkelen de siste fem årene, men jeg vil også snart lese bøker og skrive på norsk.


I dag har jeg lært den sjette leksjonen i Assimil. Jeg har naturligvis også lest den syvende,
repetisjonsleksjonen. Etterpå hørte jeg på en av mine favorittsanger, Idyll, av Postgirobygget. Jeg hadde
allerede oversatt teksten og kunne synge den, derfor spilte jeg bare sangen en gang.

Jeg er glad for å kunne bruke Assimil, og det er veldig hyggelig å hente ned en bok du liker som bare har
stått i bokhyllen de siste fem årene. Jeg vil også snart lese bøker og skrive på norsk.

Please tell me if corrections are unwelcome! And please note that on a couple of occasions, I have rewritten
things which were perfectly possible (like the word order in the second sentence) in order to make it as close
to natural speech as possible.

Everything you wrote was perfectly understandable, and there were only two words which sounded really odd
in the context you were using them (anmeldelse and sokkelen). Everything else were just minor mistakes.

I am impressed!
3 persons have voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 22 of 338
16 August 2012 at 11:38pm | IP Logged 
Corrections were all welcome, Solfrid Cristin, it's ok, it's all clear what are grammar, spelling, usage and style corrections. Thanks a lot! That's what I need the most at my studies.
1 person has voted this message useful



Medulin
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Croatia
Joined 4504 days ago

1199 posts - 2192 votes 
Speaks: Croatian*, English, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Norwegian, Hindi, Nepali

 
 Message 23 of 338
17 August 2012 at 2:58am | IP Logged 
if you need a dictionary, this is a nice German-Norwegian one, and it indicates tones too (after all Norwegian is a pitch accent language):

http://de.pons.eu/dict/search/results/?q=bildet&l=deno&in=&l f=de

As for U and Y:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHnXihStww0
2 persons have voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 24 of 338
17 August 2012 at 10:12pm | IP Logged 
Medulin (=TeneReef?): that *cute"* girl speaks which such a flapped r! Anyway, now that I listened to the video, I can be sure that I won't confuse i, u and y, at least not consciously. I can hear clearly the difference between each pair of them. Oh, tones are also ok, they do sound different this time after I've been through Chinese. First time I tried Norwegian I had not the slightest clue how to handle them. As for the dic, my German is worse than my Norwegian (not really, but it will be because I'm studying Norwegian actively and not English).

I have yet to find a more trustworthy dictionary than GoogleTrans, what do you guys use oline in daily life? (I mean online because I surely got Haugen and another one I forgot that does the other way round Haugen doesn't).

En liten leksjon var ikke tilstrekkelig, og jeg vil skrive på norsk igjen. Jeg har lest leksjonen på bussen, før jeg kom til kontoret. Assimils noter er alltid veldig interessante, men i jeg ville gjerne spare tid til å lese og skrive etter leksjonen i dag. Denne er fortsatt for korte, og jeg synes at det er så mye å lære etter Assimil! Kanskje skulle jeg se etter noen tekster fra aviser om kultur, samfunn, selv sladder - jeg vil bare ikke lese om politik!


1 person has voted this message useful



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