Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Small Expectations

  Tags: Georgian
 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
431 messages over 54 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 48 ... 53 54 Next >>
zecchino1991
Senior Member
United States
facebook.com/amyybur
Joined 3564 days ago

778 posts - 885 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Italian, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Arabic (Written), Romanian, Icelandic, Georgian

 
 Message 377 of 431
26 October 2012 at 8:26pm | IP Logged 
I just read everything you guys wrote, and I understood most of it! Thank you, that was
very good practice! :)

მარი,ძალიან ბედნიერი ვარ, რომ ასე ბევრი ქართველი ამ ფორუმში წერს. მეც ვსწავლობ ქართულს
უკვე ერთ წელზე მეტია, როგორც თქვენი მეგობარი. :)
Beginner's Georgian-ს ვიყენებდი და ახლა კი Aronson-ს ვიყენებ.

Edited by zecchino1991 on 26 October 2012 at 8:31pm

1 person has voted this message useful



TixhiiDon
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 3770 days ago

772 posts - 1473 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese, German, Russian
Studies: Georgian

 
 Message 378 of 431
27 October 2012 at 1:06am | IP Logged 
Expugnator wrote:
Tixhiidon, I'd like to welcome you back and ask you about your learning process. I
know you've been having conversational classes and still finds trouble talking. Even so, I noticed you wrote
quite well. I, for one, don't have the chance to talk any Georgian in real life and even online, having met a few
Georgians, I don't always have topics to talk about in a natural way. So, I'm relying mostly on reading. I'd like
to know, from your experience, how much has your readings on novels, with authentic dialogues, helped you
out with writing? I'm afraid my passive skills will dettach themselves too much further from my active skills if I
keep doing it the way I'm doing now (reading 10 pages and not leaving time for writing paragraphs), and I'd
like to know if by reading actual dialogues like I'm doing now at the Continuing Course I wouldn't be able to
actively use this knowledge in sequence.


Expugnator, thanks for the welcome. It's good to be back!

To be honest I'm not really sure what has helped me to progress most with my Georgian. When it comes to
language learning, I've always believed that a bit of everything is best. I suppose my only other "method" is
to move onto native materials as quickly as possible.

My conversation classes are tough but I'm getting better slowly but surely. I'm often frustrated at what I can't
say but sometimes surprise myself with what I can. With other languages I've found that speaking ability
really only comes with practice, and that it is possible to reach a high reading standard without being able to
speak at all, so I really recommend you get some speaking practice somehow or other if this is important to
you.

Have you heard about the Gold List method? There's lots of information about it on here. I got really into this
a year or so ago, and although I was sceptical at first I managed to store lots of vocabulary in my long term
memory thanks to it. Just the other day in my conversation lesson, I managed to dredge up the word for
"garage" ფარეხი from my lists, and on other occasions I've surprised myself with გალია and
დამრიგებელი. I don't know how it works, but it does.

I've also watched a lot of TV on Rustavi-2, in particular a quiz show called "ra sad rodis". This is still very
difficult, but each time I manage to pick up more and more. I've also watched a few recent Georgian movies.
There is some great stuff being made, but of curse it's very difficult to understand. I guess listening is my
weakest skill at the moment.

And as I've written previously, I've bought loads of contemporary Georgian fiction from various sources. I
really like this stuff as it is a window onto modern Georgian life and a good way to pick up vocab, sentence
structure, slang, and conversational Georgian. There is also a great sense of satisfaction when you manage
to understand a sentence, or a paragraph, or a whole page.

People on here often talk about reading Harry Potter or The Little Prince in their target languages, but I must
admit I find this idea quite crazy. Why would you read translated children's books when stuff is being written
in your target language by much better writers about modern adult lives? Personal choice, I suppose, but for
me an interest in a language is inextricably bound up with an interest in the country and culture of that
language. One without the other is pointless.

And finally, yes, I think writing is extremely useful. I notice on your log you often talk about not wanting to
pick up bad habits, but personally I believe that practice is more important no matter how many mistakes you
make. After all, at our age we will sadly never be perfect Georgian speakers, so it doesn't really matter if we
make a few mistakes here and there. If you look back to the beginning of my log you'll see I wrote some
pretty dreadful Georgian, but now I can write quite well.

Anyway, I hope this all gives you food for thought. Let me know if the's anything else I can help you with.

EDIT: By the way, I noticed you are working on the dialogs in the Continuing Course. I think these are
completely brilliant. I can't recommend them enough! I've honestly never seen such good dialogs in any
foreign language textbook. You'll learn a lot from them.

Edited by TixhiiDon on 27 October 2012 at 1:13am

2 persons have voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3472 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 379 of 431
27 October 2012 at 11:58pm | IP Logged 
TixhiiDon wrote:

To be honest I'm not really sure what has helped me to progress most with my Georgian.
When it comes to language learning, I've always believed that a bit of everything is
best. I suppose my only other "method" is to move onto native materials as quickly as
possible.


I also do a bit of everything myself. As for moving onto native materials, I still plan
to finish the Continuing Course (which contains native material itself anyway).

Quote:
With other languages I've found that speaking ability
really only comes with practice, and that it is possible to reach a high reading
standard without being able to speak at all, so I really recommend you get some
speaking practice somehow or other if this is important to you.


I think I could already survive in Georgia as a tourist, but i need more practice in
order to produce sentences more naturally. I can try to write short paragraphs each
day, but I'm already doing this for French and Norwegian and I'm running out of
subjects =D My life isn't that complex and I don't wanna get into culture, politics,
quantum physics or any other tough subjects yet ;) I have yet to gather experience from
other learners here at HTLAL on how they deal with the issue of lack of subjects on the
HTLAL. I think if I manage to write I won't have much trouble talking, I just have to
pay strong attention to the conversational markers available at Kiziria's dialogues at
ACC and the Facebook posts from Georgians.

Quote:
Have you heard about the Gold List method? There's lots of information about it
on here. I got really into this a year or so ago, and although I was sceptical at
first I managed to store lots of vocabulary in my long term memory thanks to it. Just
the other day in my conversation lesson, I managed to dredge up the word for
"garage" ფარეხი from my lists, and on other occasions I've surprised myself with გალია
and დამრიგებელი. I don't know how it works, but it does.

I did hear about it but forgot, will check again later.

Quote:
I've also watched a lot of TV on Rustavi-2, in particular a quiz show called "ra
sad rodis". This is still very difficult, but each time I manage to pick up more and
more.

Maybe it's still too early for me, but I have the impression I will be surprised with
how much I can understand when I try.

Quote:
I've also watched a few recent Georgian movies.


Reminds me I have to browse back your log from the beginning, as I was doing with mine,
in order to keep track of everything important.

Quote:
People on here often talk about reading Harry Potter or The Little Prince in
their target languages, but I must admit I find this idea quite crazy.


The reason I'm going to start with universal classics is the familiarity with the text,
that will allow me to focus on the language. Then I'll move on to the classics just for
the sake of the availability. Even at the most obscure sites I think I only found the
classics. Maybe if you give out a few names of contemporary authors I'd be glad to try.
I have the very same problem with French or Norwegian. As for French, natives are
always reluctant to point out contemporary authors as they seem not to be
'consolidated' yet as 'genuine' French culture. As for Norwegian, it's a matter of
availability, I haven't figured out if I'll be able to order in anything other than
euros or dollars with my card.

Quote:
EDIT: By the way, I noticed you are working on the dialogs in the Continuing
Course. I think these are completely brilliant. I can't recommend them enough! I've
honestly never seen such good dialogs in any foreign language textbook. You'll learn a
lot from them.


I couldn't agree more. They are so natural, they flow so logically, consistently and in
a contextualized way that I can read one at a day at about 1 hour, even considering my
current level that is still low, having to look up hundreds of words. zecchino1991
definitely needs them as well!!
1 person has voted this message useful



zecchino1991
Senior Member
United States
facebook.com/amyybur
Joined 3564 days ago

778 posts - 885 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Italian, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Arabic (Written), Romanian, Icelandic, Georgian

 
 Message 380 of 431
28 October 2012 at 12:55am | IP Logged 
Expugnator wrote:
I can try to write short paragraphs each
day, but I'm already doing this for French and Norwegian and I'm running out of
subjects =D My life isn't that complex and I don't wanna get into culture, politics,
quantum physics or any other tough subjects yet ;) I have yet to gather experience from
other learners here at HTLAL on how they deal with the issue of lack of subjects on the
HTLAL.


I don't know about you, but I don't mind writing about the same thing more than once.
In fact, when I write something in my Georgian log, I usually go over to my Russian log
and write basically the same thing, and vice versa. Or, you can just make things up.
I've done that a few times haha.

Expugnator wrote:
zecchino1991 definitely needs them as well!!


Where can I get them?
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3472 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 381 of 431
28 October 2012 at 9:32pm | IP Logged 
zecchino1991 wrote:
I don't know about you, but I don't mind writing about the same
thing more than once. In fact, when I write something in my Georgian log, I usually go
over to my Russian log and write basically the same thing, and vice versa. Or, you can
just make things up. I've done that a few times haha.


Oh I do. I wouldn't feel comfortable at making situations up, but maybe I could try
writing short stories, which are way more difficult but also more interesting. I think
I'm going to open a topic at the Language Techniques forum.

zecchino1991 wrote:
Where can I get them?

Check your FB msgs , I'll tell you how to get them.
1 person has voted this message useful



TixhiiDon
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 3770 days ago

772 posts - 1473 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese, German, Russian
Studies: Georgian

 
 Message 382 of 431
08 November 2012 at 12:12am | IP Logged 
I am being punished for my sins in this life and all my past lives by Aronson Chapter
10. This is, for the tiny few of you who didn't know, the chapter dealing with the
present perfect and pluperfect of Class I and Class III verbs. I thought I had this
down fairly well, but sadly no. Someone please remind me never to attempt to make an
unreal condition in Georgian ever. It's just not worth the hassle...

By the way, unless I'm missing something, the usually completely reliable Aronson seems
to contradict himself in this chapter. In the grammar notes he tells us that in
sentences where we would use the pluperfect in English (for example "He had already
spoken to his lawyer when he sent the letter"), Georgian uses either the aorist or the
present perfect with უკვე, but then in the sentences for translation he goes on to use
the Georgian pluperfect in exactly such sentences. For some reason (possibly because
I'm on Day 4 of my latest attempt to quit smoking), this drove me into paroxysms of
irritation, so I need some clarity from Murdoc, Mari, or any other passing Georgian.

So, to say in Georgian "They had already received the information when the letter was
sent to them", which of the following is better?

1. მათ ცნობები უკვე მიეღოთ, როცა მათ წერილი გაეგზავნა. (i.e. pluperfect)
2. მათ ცნობები უკვე მიიღეს, როცა მათ წერილი გაეგზავნა. (i.e. aorist)
3. მათ ცნობები უკვე მიუღიათ, როცა მათ წერილი გაეგზავნა. (i.e. present perfect)

წინასწარ მადლობა.
1 person has voted this message useful



marich27
Triglot
Groupie
Netherlands
Joined 3723 days ago

41 posts - 42 votes
Speaks: Georgian*, EnglishC2, Dutch

 
 Message 383 of 431
08 November 2012 at 12:43am | IP Logged 
The first part of the 1st sentence is correct, but I would change the 2nd part into როცა
მათ წერილი გაუგზავნეს. Btw, Aronson is focused on rather formal Georgian which is not bad
but maybe it's also interesting to know how the same idea will sound in everyday
language. Here it is: მათ ცნობები (უკვე) მიღებული ჰქონდათ როცა წერილი გაუგზავნეს.

წარმატებები! :)
1 person has voted this message useful



marich27
Triglot
Groupie
Netherlands
Joined 3723 days ago

41 posts - 42 votes
Speaks: Georgian*, EnglishC2, Dutch

 
 Message 384 of 431
08 November 2012 at 12:50am | IP Logged 


მარი,ძალიან ბედნიერი ვარ, რომ ასე ბევრი ქართველი ამ ფორუმში წერს. მეც ვსწავლობ ქართულს
უკვე ერთ წელზე მეტია, როგორც თქვენი მეგობარი. :)
Beginner's Georgian-ს ვიყენებდი და ახლა კი Aronson-ს ვიყენებ. [/QUOTE]

zecchino1991, ყოჩაღ!ძალიან გამართული ქართულით გაქვს ეს წინადადებები დაწერილი. ერთ წელში
ბევრი გისწავლია :)


1 person has voted this message useful



This discussion contains 431 messages over 54 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.3281 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2020 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.