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Chung at work / Chung pri práci

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Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5424 days ago

4228 posts - 8254 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 137 of 541
25 April 2012 at 6:44am | IP Logged 
FINNISH

I've just worked through Chapter 13 of "Kuulostaa hyvältä". The course's dialogue was about Anna accompanying Jutta to the post office where the latter sends stuff back to Germany and tells Anna a bit about her brother and grandmother. The grammatical foci were the possessive suffixes and verbal nouns.

***

LATVIAN

I have just completed Chapter 4 of the new edition of "Colloquial Latvian" and got introduced to the genitive, prefixes, and more about telling the time.

***

POLISH

I did Unit 3 of "Reading Authentic Polish" and studied the section on communication for chapter 1 in "Kiedyś wrócisz tu... część 1: Gdzie nadwiślański brzeg" This section deals with expressing opinions and common phrases or expressions used in this function.

I also made a pleasant discovery for anyone who wants to use the 2nd edition (1983) of Oscar Swan's "First Year Polish" in his/her studies which can be had for fairly cheap (below $20 US including shipping within the USA) per Bookfinder. Someone on the forum at FSI-Language-Courses found out from Prof. Swan that the domain holding his online course in Polish also has the archive of the older textbook's audio (and apparently that too of his equally excellent textbook "Beginning Slovak"). The audio is in .aiff (basically Apple's counterpart to the .wav file) but can be played as is or converted to .mp3 using Audacity. Since the files are not in a "lossy" format like .mp3s or .wma, they're quite large and could take some time to download.

For anyone who has any lingering doubt about Prof. Swan's courses I recommend them highly drawing on having worked through the online version of "First-Year Polish" (which alas still has only half of the dialogues recorded), "Intermediate Polish" (never got the audio for this one) and "Beginning Slovak" (I paid a pretty penny for the book and cassettes but it was worth it when my choices for Slovak were limited).

***

MISCELLANEA

As mentioned in the last entry, here's another set of expressions for disbelief.

- Disbelief

"Unbelievable!"
Uskomatonta! (Finnish)
Hihetetlen! (Hungarian)
Dat lea jáhkkemeahttun! (Northern Saami)*
Niewiarygodne! (Polish)
Neuveriteľné! (Slovak)

* This is an informed guess based on what I learned from "Davvin" and Sammallahti's Finnish <> Northern Saami dictionary.

For the next entry, I'll include another set of expressions for disbelief.

I apologize for the time elapsed since my last entry about my studies. I went through a busy period from work that left me unusually drained thus decelerating my studies while I managed to distract myself for part of last week when taking up Serpent's mini challenge.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Rowerzysta
Newbie
Poland
Joined 2880 days ago

12 posts - 20 votes

 
 Message 138 of 541
25 April 2012 at 3:01pm | IP Logged 
Heh, Kuulostaa hyvältä is the course "my student" loves most. She wasn't able to progress much with Leila White or Aaltio, but she fell in love with Kuulostaa hyvältä and is improving fast.

("My student" in quotation marks as I don't really teach her, just help her out when she has a problem, etc.).

***

By the way I started 'Kiedyś wrócisz tu..., część pierwsza' too a few days ago, but I wouldn't if I didn't have someone to ask for translations and help anytime I needed.
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5424 days ago

4228 posts - 8254 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 139 of 541
25 April 2012 at 6:00pm | IP Logged 
I liked White's "From Start to Finnish" (especially the dialogues incorporating colloquial elements or informal situations) but as is typical for me, I finished that course wishing that there had been more exercises. I liked Aaltio's "Finnish for Foreigners" more (I've done part 1 so far) since it had lots of exercises and concise explanations of grammar. Overall, I so far like "Kuulostaa hyvältä" as much as Aaltio's course since it has concise and explanations while the videos compensate for there not being quite as many exercises. In any case, I'd pick any of the above courses over the mainstays here such as "Colloquial Finnish", "Teach Yourself Finnish" or "Mastering Finnish" or even Assimil's "Le Finnois sans peine".

I've been a big fan of Universitas' series ever since I started learning Polish with "Cześć, jak się masz?" in university. As far as I know it also has the only set of courses for foreigners that progresses from A1 to C1 for Polish (i.e. "Cześć, jak się masz?" > "Z poskim na ty" > "Kiedyś wrócisz tu...").
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Rowerzysta
Newbie
Poland
Joined 2880 days ago

12 posts - 20 votes

 
 Message 140 of 541
26 April 2012 at 8:47pm | IP Logged 
Chung wrote:
I liked White's "From Start to Finnish" (especially the dialogues incorporating colloquial elements or informal situations) but as is typical for me, I finished that course wishing that there had been more exercises. I liked Aaltio's "Finnish for Foreigners" more (I've done part 1 so far) since it had lots of exercises and concise explanations of grammar. Overall, I so far like "Kuulostaa hyvältä" as much as Aaltio's course since it has concise and explanations while the videos compensate for there not being quite as many exercises. In any case, I'd pick any of the above courses over the mainstays here such as "Colloquial Finnish", "Teach Yourself Finnish" or "Mastering Finnish" or even Assimil's "Le Finnois sans peine"

I tried to translate some Finnois sans peine into Italian (another language she is studying), but gave up after a few lessons out of laziness. She appreciated it though, and will forever remember the "why do you love only part of me?" dialogue (rakastan sinua, partitiivi).

Quote:
I've been a big fan of Universitas' series ever since I started learning Polish with "Cześć, jak się masz?" in university. As far as I know it also has the only set of courses for foreigners that progresses from A1 to C1 for Polish (i.e. "Cześć, jak się masz?" > "Z poskim na ty" > "Kiedyś wrócisz tu...").

Supermemo's Polski Bez Problemu - which is a complete course with a textbook and mp3 recordings,though it is better used together with their internet or software spaced repetition system - in theory reaches C1, though I didn't feel C1 when I completed it. But I agree, the Universitas collection of books for foreigners is impressive, especially for intermediate and advanced students. And I love the fact that here in Poland they can often be found in cheap book stores at half the price. ;-)

Edited by Rowerzysta on 26 April 2012 at 8:49pm

1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5424 days ago

4228 posts - 8254 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 141 of 541
06 May 2012 at 6:30am | IP Logged 
FINNISH

I've just worked through Chapter 14 of "Kuulostaa hyvältä". The course's dialogue was about Anna and Anssi talking about their childhood. The grammatical focus was the simple past tense which is more often referred to as "imperfect" very likely because of the Romance or Germanic imprinting/"contamination" of the grammarians who helped codify Finnish. I find it unhelpful to use the term "imperfect" here regardless of the "tradition" because the actions described by this conjugation in Finnish can indeed be "perfect" - i.e. a completed action in the past that may have acheived this state at a point in time.

***

LATVIAN

I have completed Chapter 5 of the new edition of "Colloquial Latvian" and got introduced to the future tense, genitive as a negative predicate, and ways to express one's affinity to things and food.

***

POLISH

I did Unit 4 of "Reading Authentic Polish" and studied the section on reading for chapter 1 in "Kiedyś wrócisz tu... część 1: Gdzie nadwiślański brzeg" This section deals with homesickness and introduced a few idiomatic expressions with dom "house", kąt "corner" and powietrze "air".

***

MISCELLANEA

As mentioned in the last entry, here're more expressions for disbelief (unfortunately I don't know what they are in Northern Saami). These are less polite than the previous examples and require more care in their use.

- Disbelief

"Yeah, right!"
Niin varmaan! (Finnish - it means "yeah, probably" but not if said sarcastically)
Persze! (Hungarian - it means "of course" but works similarly to the Finnish expression here)
Taa, jasne (Polish - it means "yeah, clearly" but works similarly to the Finnish and Hungarian expressions here)
No určite! (Slovak - it means "yeah, for sure" but not if said in a certain tone and especially when followed by Preskočilo ti? ("Have you gone nuts?") or something similar)

"Вull$ћ¡†!"
Hevonpaskat! (Finnish)
Baromság! (Hungarian)
Gówno prawda! (Polish)
Voloviny! (Slovak)

Take some care when you want to use the last one and you can make it more vulgar by basically using the equivalent of "that's f------ bull$ћ¡†!" but I don't want to go that far.

For the next entry, I'll list another set of expressions or interjections but I'm not yet sure which one.
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hribecek
Triglot
Senior Member
Czech Republic
Joined 3617 days ago

1243 posts - 1458 votes 
Speaks: English*, Czech, Spanish
Studies: Italian, Polish, Slovak, Hungarian, Toki Pona, Russian

 
 Message 142 of 541
07 May 2012 at 12:46pm | IP Logged 
Regarding your last couple of disbelief expressions, I'll just add what I think they would be in Czech.

POLITE DISBELIEF

JE͊I MARIE!
TO SNAD NE!
JEKOVY VOI/ZRAK! (When seeing something unbelievable, literally "Hedgehogs eyes!")

I hear all of these a lot, especially number 1 and 3.

IMPOLITE DISBELIEF

TY VOLE!
TY KRVO!

There are many other "Ty ..." possibilities.
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5424 days ago

4228 posts - 8254 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 143 of 541
07 May 2012 at 8:43pm | IP Logged 
hribecek wrote:
Regarding your last couple of disbelief expressions, I'll just add what I think they would be in Czech.

POLITE DISBELIEF

JE�͊I MARIE!
TO SNAD NE!
JE�KOVY VO�I/ZRAK! (When seeing something unbelievable, literally "Hedgehog�s eyes!")

I hear all of these a lot, especially number 1 and 3.

IMPOLITE DISBELIEF

TY VOLE!
TY KR�VO!

There are many other "Ty ..." possibilities.


For some reason, this wasn't set in Unicode by default. For what it's worth, the Czech expressions are:

Ježíši Marie!
To snad ne!
Ježkovy voči / Ježkovy zrak!

Ty vole!
Ty krávo!

1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5424 days ago

4228 posts - 8254 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 144 of 541
21 May 2012 at 5:20am | IP Logged 
FINNISH

I've just worked through Chapter 15 of "Kuulostaa hyvältä". The course's dialogue was about Anna and Jutta talking to each other under apparently strained circumstances as Anna seems visibly annoyed by Jutta's presence. The grammatical focus was the compound past tense which is more often referred to as "perfect" again very likely because of the Romance or Germanic imprinting/"contamination" of the grammarians who helped codify Finnish. I find it unhelpful to use the term "perfect" here regardless of the "tradition" because the actions described by this conjugation in Finnish can from a certain point of view be "imperfect" - i.e. the action in began in the past but is not complete or this past action is relevant to the present (cf. present perfect in English. E.g. Olen ollut Suomessa kaksi viikkoa "I have been in Finland for two weeks")

***

LATVIAN

I have completed Chapter 6 of the new edition of "Colloquial Latvian" and got introduced to the adjective endings, genitive as governed by quantifiers and kinship terms.

***

POLISH

I did Unit 5 of "Reading Authentic Polish" and did the communicative exercises for chapter 1 in "Kiedyś wrócisz tu... część 1: Gdzie nadwiślański brzeg". These exercises involved responding to various topics or suppositions. In addition I did the oral drills in chapters 10 and 11 from Schenker's "Beginning Polish" if only to get myself used to uttering some Polish again.

***

MISCELLANEA

As mentioned in the last entry, here's a new set of expressions. This one is for protest.

- Protest

"(Oh), come on!"
Nyt hei! (Finnish)
Ugyan már! (Hungarian)
Chyba żartujesz! (Polish)
(Ale) prosím ťa! (Slovak)

For the next entry, I'll list another set of expressions or interjections.


1 person has voted this message useful



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