Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Chung at work / Chung pri práci

 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
541 messages over 68 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 67 68
Doitsujin
Diglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 2698 days ago

1248 posts - 1120 votes 
Speaks: German*, English

 
 Message 537 of 541
12 August 2016 at 10:18am | IP Logged 
Cherepaha wrote:
frajer = gullible man, sucker (Polish)
frajer = boyfriend (Slovak)
фр’айер = gullible man, sucker, somebody who doesn’t belong to the criminal world and is an easy target for a
crime (Russian)


AFAIK, the Polish and Russian meanings are identical to the Yiddish word freier, while the Slovak meaning is pretty much identical to the old German meaning of Freier = suitor. (Nowadays, Freier is usually used in German to refer to the clients of prostitutes.)
1 person has voted this message useful



Cherepaha
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3967 days ago

126 posts - 49 votes
Speaks: Russian*, English
Studies: Spanish, Polish, Latin, French

 
 Message 538 of 541
12 September 2016 at 7:53pm | IP Logged 
viedums wrote:
Some Latvian etymologies – strādāt (work) is cognate with Russian stradàtj (suffer). There’s a
semantic parallel with French travailler and English travails.


viedums, there is a Russian cognate with the same meaning as you are describing for Latvian, i.e. "work". It is used in
reference to agricultural work only. Cтрада [stra'da] is Russian for "intense summer-time work during the
harvesting of the grain producing crops" ("напряжённая летняя работа во время косьбы, жатвы и уборки хлеба"
per Wikipedia).
1 person has voted this message useful



Cherepaha
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3967 days ago

126 posts - 49 votes
Speaks: Russian*, English
Studies: Spanish, Polish, Latin, French

 
 Message 539 of 541
12 September 2016 at 8:15pm | IP Logged 
viedums wrote:
That's an excellent point, Evita - the distinction between long and short vowels is really key.
Missing it in the cases you mention (locative and verb endings) could easily lead to miscomprehension. It can also
be tricky keeping track of long and short vowels in verb conjugation, one set (the one ending in –īt) works a bit
differently. The point about it being a problem for Russians speaking Latvian is right too – I heard Ušakovs give an
interview in Latvian, he spoke at a fast pace but his garās patskaņas were nonexistent!


Stressed vowels in Russian language are pronounced louder and are stretched to be somewhat longer. And if you
whisper, making sounds louder doesn't work, so just the length of the vowel indicates that the stress falls onto it. As
a result to a Russian speaker a long vowel sounds like it is under stress. Consequently, if in studying a foreign
language one is told that stress falls on the 1st syllable, but that vowel in the 2nd syllable should be long, in trying
to pronounce it a Russian speaker hears that both vowels are under stress. Trying to resolve that doesn't easily lead
to successfully separating "stressed" from "long", and I think that this confusion might explain why Russian speakers
give up on mastering the proper control of the vowel length.
1 person has voted this message useful



Cherepaha
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3967 days ago

126 posts - 49 votes
Speaks: Russian*, English
Studies: Spanish, Polish, Latin, French

 
 Message 540 of 541
12 September 2016 at 9:54pm | IP Logged 
Chung wrote:

Zajebiście! "(Freakin') awesome!"* (Polish)

* Depending on whom you talk to, this may be vulgar.


In Russian language this is definitely a part of the taboo vocabulary known as мат [mat], as it makes a reference to
intercourse.

I don't know anything about Polish curse words -- does Polish use a subset of the same mat as Russian, or is this
just an instance of a "cool" borrowing from Russian or Ukranian?

1 person has voted this message useful



Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
Joined 3975 days ago

9756 posts - 6179 votes 
4 sounds
Speaks: Russian*, English, FinnishC1, Latin, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Danish, Romanian, Polish, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Catalan, Czech, Galician, Dutch, Swedish

 
 Message 541 of 541
30 September 2016 at 5:01pm | IP Logged 
The root is present in all Slavic languages. It's not on the Swadesh list but it's definitely core vocabulary...


1 person has voted this message useful



This discussion contains 541 messages over 68 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 

If you wish to post a reply to this topic you must first login. If you are not already registered you must first register


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.2650 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2017 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.