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Chung at work / Chung pri práci

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Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5558 days ago

4228 posts - 8256 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 377 of 541
09 September 2013 at 3:02am | IP Logged 
TURKISH

I’ve worked through Unit 5 of “Turkish Self-Study Course” and the material on pgs. 30-36 (rest of Unit 2) in “Elementary Turkish”. I studied more about declarative and interrogative sentences and with the copula suffix –dır etc. and demonstrative pronouns but with the addition of the plural suffix -lar etc. In the latter I studied the conjunctions ile / ve “and”, and ama “but” and then finished the main section of exercises which touched on all of the topics and vocabulary encountered in the unit.

***

UKRAINIAN

I’ve done the exercises on pgs. 154-6 in Chapter 9 of “Modern Ukrainian”. These exercises reviewed what had been introduced in the preceding chapters and also contained questions for reading comprehension of the chapter’s narratives and dialogues.



(From Неймовірні пригоди на Місяці via комікси | Це прекрасно! | Український інформаційно-розважальний портал)

1) “Houston…”
2) “…you’re not going to believe [this]”

Convention for vocabulary in the comic strip that's unfamiliar to me (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (1st person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb], 3rd person plural present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb])
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

OTHER LANGUAGES

As noted before I’m pretty busy right now and don’t expect to post much here for the next little bit. I may put down another short entry in about a week.
______


2 persons have voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5558 days ago

4228 posts - 8256 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 378 of 541
13 September 2013 at 8:13pm | IP Logged 
There's no proper entry this time even though I have been studying my Turkish material. I'm about to set out to Eastern Europe to visit some friends and won't be back into the swing of things until October.

As a bit of a placeholder, here are some comic strips for anyone's amusement.

***

BCMS/SC



1) "A spider!"
2) "I hate spiders!"
4) "Listen, my old friend. Maybe it'd be better for you to hate termites!"

(Source: Qolombo)

***

CZECH



1) "You're doing a great job, neighbour! - Yeah. I'm in a hurry to get to work."
2) "So work [faster] so that you'll manage to dig out your own car too."

(Source: S H O O T Y - Kluci v letech 28)

***

FINNISH



1) "Here comes the truck! Vram! Vram!"
2) "...[and the] forklift. Vrum! Vrum!"
3) "[and the] excavator. Vrom! Vrom!"
4) [farting]
5) "What in the world was that?"
6) "It's probably yesterday's garbage truck."

(Source: Supermukala » Blog Archive » Drive-in - sapuskaa)

***

HUNGARIAN



1) "Left, right. Left, right. Left, right."
2) "Damn it! I can't avoid this lousy grass here."
3) "Up, down. Up, down. Up, down. - Well, this isn't any better."

(Source: Marabu BlogLap: Extrém comic strip - Hangyások) (Cf. hangya "ant")

***

POLISH



1) "OK. We have computers."
2) "We have games."
3) "And we have 4 cases of Pepsi."
4) "You brought the network cables, right?" [asked by everyone simultaneously]

(From: Real Life via Smiech.net)

***

SLOVAK



1) "Chestnuts! What can be better in such weather! - I love how they warm the hands."
7) "The eternal problems of cold hands!"

(Source: S H O O T Y - Grogy: Gaštany)

***

UKRAINIAN



1) "Alright, now I will hit the apple blindfolded!"
4) "So? Did I hit it?"
5) "Yeah, almost."

(Source: Попав! | Огірок - переклади коміксів украïнською)

______



Edited by Chung on 02 October 2013 at 10:49pm

2 persons have voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5558 days ago

4228 posts - 8256 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 379 of 541
02 October 2013 at 11:51pm | IP Logged 
I've just come back from another trip to Eastern Europe and not to my surprise I got a bit of a boost when it coes to motivation for studying - Polish in particular.

If anyone here goes to Kraków and already knows enough Polish to make use of textbooks published in Polish, I recommend a visit to Główna Księgarnia Naukowa ("Main Scientific Bookstore") (especially its wing dedicated to language and linguistics whose entrance is about 50 meters to the left of the entrance to the main bookstore) and Skład Tanich Książek ("Depot of Cheap Books") in the Old Town. I picked up a new textbook for Ukrainian meant for intermediate students, Język ukraiński dla średniozaawansowanych (z CD) for about 40 zlotys (~ $13 US) and was initially pleased with myself until I discovered that equally brand-new copies of the same course were going for about 16 zlotys (~ $5 US) at Skład Tanich Książek).

In any case, I am most interested in working through this course. It seems to be a logical second step in my plan to study Ukrainian given that "Modern Ukrainian" which I'm using now is meant for beginners, and for a while I have been looking for something that could fall between "Modern Ukrainian" and "Ukrainian through its Living Culture" in level of difficulty (the latter is meant for advanced students). The biggest drawback of this course from Poland is that it has no answer key, but at least there are about 2 hours of audio in .mp3 format accompanying the 28 lessons in the textbook and what I feel is a decent quantity of exercises per chapter. I also hope that this will slightly improve my passive understanding of Polish since all of the instructions and explanations of grammar (including points of reference to counterparts in Polish grammar) are in Polish.

I also browsed a few dictionaries there but nothing really caught my eye or was impressive enough for me to buy for myself.
2 persons have voted this message useful



hribecek
Triglot
Senior Member
Czech Republic
Joined 3751 days ago

1243 posts - 1458 votes 
Speaks: English*, Czech, Spanish
Studies: Italian, Polish, Slovak, Hungarian, Toki Pona, Russian

 
 Message 380 of 541
05 October 2013 at 5:20pm | IP Logged 
Where did you go this time? Which languages did you get to use? Any particular language based experiences?
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5558 days ago

4228 posts - 8256 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 381 of 541
05 October 2013 at 7:04pm | IP Logged 
I visited some friends in Czech Republic, Poland, and Slovakia speaking Slovak, Polish or English as needed. Nothing extraordinary but it was definitely nice to see them again.
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5558 days ago

4228 posts - 8256 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 382 of 541
06 October 2013 at 9:37pm | IP Logged 
FINNISH

I’ve gone back to “Finnish for Foreigners” and set aside “FSI Conversational Finnish”. Although both courses could be perceived as “dry” or old-fashioned for many people, an emerging problem with the latter was the amount of information presented in every chapter. I suppose that this would not be a problem for someone using the material as a supplement to the material from a course at the FSI but on its own it’s too tough for me to use productively. One aspect that favours “Finnish for Foreigners” is the division of the material into more chapters which in turn allows for a greater number of exercises for each topic introduced. It also helps that the chapters’ lists of vocabulary are less extensive then in FSI thus lessening the strain of needing to acquire as much vocabulary before moving on to the following unit. I’m restarting from Unit 35 of “Finnish for Foreigners” whose main topic in grammar is plural declension in spatial cases (e.g. inessive, allative) and I did a few pages worth of exercises. I’m also considering one of the online courses in reading/listening comprehension for variety and also to get myself accustomed to dealing with Finnish in more authentic settings. Selkouutiset and Korvat auki are two examples of such material.



(From B. Virtanen via Kokeilu (funny pics, hauskat kuvat, huumori kuvat))

1) “Listen, Virtanen… - I’m sorry, I can’t talk now. The battery is running out.”
2) “OK. Well, let’s talk about it a bit later.” (literally: “We’ll return gradually.”)
3) “It felt dumb [to use that excuse] but it was worth a try.”

- palailla (palailen, palaili, palaillut) “to return slowly or little by little”
- älytön (älyttömän, älytöntä, älyttömiä) “dumb, foolish, unintelligent”

Convention for unfamiliar vocabulary in the comic strip (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular, partitive singular, partitive plural)
VERBS: 1st infinitive (1st person singular present tense, 3rd person singular past simple tense, active past participle)
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

POLISH

I finished Chapter 26 of "Polish in 4 Weeks - II". The dialogue consisted of Basia calling for help with a burst pipe at her home. The unit introduced phrases or structures useful for describing broken machinery and calling for professional help but none of them consisted of elements unfamiliar to me.



(From fistaszki)

1) “I’d like to have a hobby horse.”
2) “Everyone has a hobby horse except me.”
4) “Everyone!”

Convention for vocabulary in the comic strip that's unfamiliar to me (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (nominative plural, genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (1st person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb], 2nd person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb])
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

TURKISH

I’ve worked through Unit 6 of “Turkish Self-Study Course”. The content was very similar to that of the preceding unit. I studied more declarative and interrogative sentences in singular and plural with the copula suffix –dır etc. and demonstrative pronouns.

***

UKRAINIAN

I’ve done the exercises on pgs. 168-170 in Chapter 10 of “Modern Ukrainian”. These exercises focused on instrumental singular of adjectives and pronouns.



(From Зай та Друзі, Випуск 5)

1) “Meet my friend Worm!”
2) “I invited him to have lunch with us. – Hello!”
3) “There just isn’t enough to go around.”
4) “Worm, help yourself to some parmesan.”
5) “Try the fish. I made it myself.”
6) “Ugh! What kind of crap do you eat?”

Convention for vocabulary in the comic strip that's unfamiliar to me (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (1st person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb], 3rd person plural present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb])
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

OTHER LANGUAGES

I’ve finally did some more work on that guide to Uralic languages. I finished the section on comparatives and started describing briefly how to form superlatives.
______


1 person has voted this message useful



Henkkles
Triglot
Senior Member
Finland
Joined 2655 days ago

544 posts - 1141 votes 
Speaks: Finnish*, English, Swedish
Studies: Russian

 
 Message 383 of 541
06 October 2013 at 11:27pm | IP Logged 
I'm very glad to see someone go the less trodden paths. It's also always pleasant to see outlanders learning Finnish. Ah if I weren't so busy I'd love to study Ukrainian.
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5558 days ago

4228 posts - 8256 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 384 of 541
07 October 2013 at 8:54am | IP Logged 
Henkkles wrote:
I'm very glad to see someone go the less trodden paths. It's also always pleasant to see outlanders learning Finnish. Ah if I weren't so busy I'd love to study Ukrainian.


I have to admit that apart from travelling and being lucky enough to meet visitors in my home town every now and then, it can sometimes be a bit of a downer to go off the beaten path in learning languages. Classes, number of available resources and chances to meet native speakers of my target languages are fewer than if I were studying languages with higher profiles or popularity.


1 person has voted this message useful



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