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Chung at work / Chung pri práci

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maxval
Pentaglot
Senior Member
Bulgaria
maxval.co.nr
Joined 3333 days ago

852 posts - 1577 votes 
Speaks: Hungarian*, Bulgarian, English, Spanish, Russian
Studies: Latin, Modern Hebrew

 
 Message 225 of 541
03 January 2013 at 2:33pm | IP Logged 
hribecek wrote:
Chung wrote:




(From Výstava No Comment představí
nejlepší karikatury
)

I feel a bit dumb. I understand exactly what they're saying, but I don't understand
the joke. Please could you enlighten me? :(


Oh, you have a really Western mind, Hříbeček. Every Eastern European understands this
joke immediately. It means: if you vote for a new party, you will be surprised, that
the politicians from your new party are assholes, so better vote for the same party,
because you already know they are assholes, so you wont be surprised.

Edited by maxval on 03 January 2013 at 2:34pm

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hribecek
Triglot
Senior Member
Czech Republic
Joined 3609 days ago

1243 posts - 1458 votes 
Speaks: English*, Czech, Spanish
Studies: Italian, Polish, Slovak, Hungarian, Toki Pona, Russian

 
 Message 226 of 541
03 January 2013 at 4:19pm | IP Logged 
maxval wrote:

Oh, you have a really Western mind, Hříbeček. Every Eastern European understands this
joke immediately. It means: if you vote for a new party, you will be surprised, that
the politicians from your new party are assholes, so better vote for the same party,
because you already know they are assholes, so you wont be surprised.

I see, thanks. It was probably a combination of my Western mind (although I should have got it due to the fact that Czechs feel the same way about their own politicians) plus the fact that I thought it was about the snowman and I also I didn't realise that both speech bubbles belonged to one man.

Jsem tupý!
1 person has voted this message useful



Marya
Diglot
Groupie
Poland
languagewanderer.com
Joined 2674 days ago

62 posts - 77 votes 
Speaks: Polish*, English
Studies: Russian, Norwegian

 
 Message 227 of 541
04 January 2013 at 10:08am | IP Logged 
Hey:) good luck with your Polish:) powodzenia w nauce :)
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5416 days ago

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20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 228 of 541
04 January 2013 at 5:22pm | IP Logged 
Dzięki, Mariola :-)

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Anya
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Senior Member
France
Joined 4053 days ago

636 posts - 708 votes 
Speaks: Russian*, FrenchC1, English, Italian, Spanish
Studies: German, Japanese, Hungarian, Sanskrit, Portuguese, Turkish, Mandarin
Studies: Ancient Greek, Hindi

 
 Message 229 of 541
04 January 2013 at 5:49pm | IP Logged 
Happy New Year, Chung
I like very much your log with comic strips.
Good luck for 2013!
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Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5416 days ago

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Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 230 of 541
06 January 2013 at 4:01am | IP Logged 
Anya wrote:
Happy New Year, Chung
I like very much your log with comic strips.
Good luck for 2013!


Спасибо, Аня! И тебе того же желаю!
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Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5416 days ago

4228 posts - 8254 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 231 of 541
06 January 2013 at 7:16am | IP Logged 
FINNISH

I have finished Chapter 27 of "Kuulostaa hyvältä". The chapter's text was a summary about the role of the tango in Finnish culture while it introduced use of the passive past participle as an adjective. I look forward to the following chapter which seems less demanding as this text on the tango was typical of the written style with many new words and structures that I haven't encountered often if at all.



(From Viivi ja Wagner - Helsingin Sanomat via DashboardWidgets)

1) "Wagner is pretending to be ghost. That's so childish" (i.e. "Wagner is playing [the role of] a ghost")
2) "He's been oddly still for a long time."
3) Hi Viivi, I went to the pub. Wagner "...and I always fall for it."

leikkiä (leikin, leikki, leikkinyt) "to play" (intransitive)
kummitus (kummituksen, kummitusta, kummituksia) "ghost"
paikoillaan "in place, in position"
oudon "oddly, strangely"
mennä retkuun (menen retkuun, meni retkuun, mennyt retkuun) "to get fooled" (literally: "to go into the rags and tatters")

Convention for unfamiliar vocabulary in the comic strip (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular, partitive singular, partitive plural)
VERBS: 1st infinitive (1st person singular present tense, 3rd person singular past simple tense, active past participle)
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

Question for Serpent: Is my translation of oudon from this comic strip correct? Even though it looks like the genitive singular of outo my spidey sense makes me think that it's supposed to be the instructive singular of outo and over time it's become used as an adverb even though it has the same form as the genitive singular.

***

HUNGARIAN

I have finished Selection 1 of "FSI Hungarian Graded Reader". The text was a description of the family of one Mr. Fehér while the exercises tested my understanding of possession and comparative. I also completed a few exercises from “Magyarországon szeretnék dolgozni” in eMagyarul-2 which I highly recommend as a supplement for anyone learning Hungarian and past A2 (there's even a pair of diagnostic tests meant for people at A1 or A2 and are to be used to get a rough idea of how prepared one is to tackle eMagyarul-2). eMagyarul-1 is meant for beginners and looks equally solid.



(From C&H Magyarul via FunComic)

1) "Look at my new leather jacket! It just pulls in the chicks!"
2) "Wow! It really works!"
3) "Aren't you going to talk to them?" - "If I turn around, they'll run away"

Convention for unfamiliar vocabulary in the comic strip (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (nouns only: nominative possessive for 3rd person singular)
VERBS: 3rd person singular present tense (infinitive)
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

Question for maxval: How does the -ik suffix attached to the comparative or superlative form add extra meaning? (e.g. Szeretem a fiatalabbikat) My copy of FSI Hungarian Basic Course, Vol. 2 notes that it's a colloquial way to indicate preference of the comparative/superlative's associated noun but I don't get it.

***

TURKISH

I finished Unit 1 of "Teach Yourself Beginner's Turkish". The unit's dialogues and notes introduced greetings and numbers from 0 to 10 among a few other tidbits. The widespread lack of copula that I've seen so far reminds me of Ukrainian.

E.g.

"Hello, I am Chung. - Hello, I am Ayşe."
İyi günler, ben Chung. - İyi günler, ben Ayşe. (TR)
Добрий день, я Chung. - Добрий день, я Ayşe. (UK)

"Is Chung a woman? - No. He's a man"
Chung kadın mı? - Hayır. O adam. (TR)
Чи Chung жінка? - Ні. Chung чоловік. (UK)

Saying goodbye in Turkish reminds me slightly of Saamic since the expression is different depending on who initiates the departure. However it's not as complicated as in the Saamic languages which accounts for singular, dual or plural regarding the number of people being addressed.

E.g.

"Bye (~ stay well/healthy), Ayşe! - Bye (~ go well), Chung!"
Báze dearvan Ayşe! - Mana dearvan Chung! (NS)
Hoşça kalın Ayşe! - Güle güle Chung! (TR)

***

OTHER LANGUAGES

I've managed to finish short descriptions on the imperative in Meadow Mari and Hungarian for the guide to Uralic languages. I'll probably start reviewing in a few days what I learned of Northern Saami from Davvin 1 and 2, but I'm still mindful of my goal to finish Chapter 1 of Davvin 3 by the end of this month. I got a bit of time.

The next full entry should be about my Slavonic target languages.

______


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ninska
Diglot
Newbie
Spain
Joined 2702 days ago

20 posts - 25 votes
Speaks: Finnish*, English
Studies: Spanish
Studies: Catalan

 
 Message 232 of 541
06 January 2013 at 8:40am | IP Logged 
I think you understood OUDON correctly in Viivi & Wagner. Viivi is getting suspicious, because Wagner has been still too long for that to be normal. So OUDON is an adverb giving (Viivi's subjective) determination of Wagner's time in that position.
Oudon paikoillaan (oddly still, referring to the fact that subject is not moving)
Oudon kauan (oddly long time, referring to the time frame)

But I believe Serpent can explain it better.

And if you are taking notes about idioms, you might want to note that "mennä halpaan" is the traditional form of "mennä retkuun". So if you see the expression "mennä halpaan" somewhere, the meaning is exactly the same :)


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