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Chung at work / Chung pri práci

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Chung
Diglot
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Joined 5424 days ago

4228 posts - 8254 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 265 of 541
30 January 2013 at 8:09am | IP Logged 
FINNISH

I've started Chapter 30 of "Kuulostaa hyvältä". The chapter's dialogue involves Anna and Anssi talking about the painter, Akseli Gallen-Kallela, while having a drink on the occasion of Anssi's nameday. The dialogues introduced the agent participle which by coincidence mick33 touched on in this recent entry.

A couple of things jump out at me about this participle. The first is its visual resemblance to the "-ma" infinitive in Estonian.

kirjutama "to write" (Estonian)
kirjoittama "which has been / was written" (Finnish)

The second is that its use is consistent with Finnish's tendency not to use subordinated clauses as much as in Romance, Germanic or Slavonic languages. The agent participle is linked to an action in the past but my translating it closely to English would lead to awkward structures in the latter that use an adjective or that are in passive.

"In our read texts/texts read by us were many difficult words"
Meidän lukemissamme teksteissä oli paljon vaikeita sanoja

"There were many difficult words in the texts that we read"
Teksteissä, joita luimme, oli paljon vaikeita sanoja



(From Kiroilevasiili)

1) "Yes! Vacation!"
2) "Vacation? Oh, have ya been at some kinda work? - Huh? Work?"
3) "Yeah. If there's no work, then there's no vacation at all."
4) "Damned killjoy!"

This comic strip has a lot of slang and is named after the main character which is a porcupine that curses profusely. I don't find it that funny but apparently many Finns do based on the strip being awarded a prize in 2008. Nonetheless reading it is handy for reinforcing my knowledge of colloquial Finnish and slang. In this instance I understood everything without the help of a dictionary (following my Finnish friends' posts on Facebook certainly has helped with picking up slang), but I'll list the slang and colloquialisms anyway for anyone who's still very much a beginner in Finnish.

- Ai! "Oh!"
- Duuni (duunin, duunia, duuneja) "job, work" (impress your Finnish friends by saying Mä oon duunissa for the bookish Minä olen työssä or less bookish and pedestrian Mä olen töissä when you want to say: "I'm at work" or "I'm working")
- Helevetin (standard: helvetin) "damned, hell of a..."
- Jes! "Yes!"
- jossai (standard: jossa(k)in) "at/in some kind of..." (inessive singular of jokin "some")
- Ootsä ollu... (standard: Oletko sinä ollut) "Have you been", "Were you"

Convention for unfamiliar vocabulary in the comic strip (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular, partitive singular, partitive plural)
VERBS: 1st infinitive (1st person singular present tense, 3rd person singular past simple tense, active past participle)
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

NORTHERN SAAMI

I finished Unit 1 of Davvin 3 which reviewed topics seen in Davvin 1 and 2. These topics were the use of infinitive, the compound past tense, declension for stems of an odd or even number of syllables, and changes to -logi or -lohkái in compound numerals that precede nouns.

Vocabulary for Unit 1

amma - "most likely, probably"
attestit - "to give out a portion of sg"
áviisa - "newspaper"
beare - "excessively, too"
duvle - "recently"
gielistit - "to tell a lie"
láhppit - "to lose, misplace"
máksit - "to pay"
vahkku - "week"
viežžat - "to get, retrieve, seek"

***

TURKISH

I finished Unit 4 of "Teach Yourself Beginner's Turkish". The unit's dialogues and notes introduced the locative suffixes -da / -de, interrogative particles mi / mı / mu / mü, and common phrases used when eating out. It is somewhat disconcerting for me that Turkish is not holding my fascination as much as I had thought that it would / should. It seems to be a combination of being "just another language" in my rotation and a large portion of the vocabulary which has no similarity to anything that I've seen before. I do hope that this will pass in good time, since I don't feel that I'm devoting as much time to it as I would to a new language that requires much work to become just a solid beginner in it.

***

OTHER LANGUAGES

As my next deadline for BCMS/SC approaches, I've been doing "passive shadowing" of the dialogues in Chapter 4 of "Teach Yourself Serbian" and Chapter 2 of "Spoken World: Croatian". I also finished my homework for my Ukrainian class, and have been doing passive shadowing of the dialogues and narratives in Chapters 2 and 3 in "Modern Ukrainian". Being so tongue-tied in my last Ukrainian class still stings on the inside...

______



Edited by Chung on 05 March 2013 at 5:53am

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sans-serif
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Finland
Joined 2827 days ago

298 posts - 470 votes 
Speaks: Finnish*, English, German, Swedish
Studies: Danish

 
 Message 266 of 541
30 January 2013 at 8:39am | IP Logged 
Chung wrote:
2) "Vacation? Oh, have ya been at some kinda work? - Huh? Work?"

The way I understand "Ai ootsä ollu jossai duunissa?" is closer to "You have (had) a job?" or "You've been working somewhere?".

"Olla duunissa" and "olla X:llä duunissa" are two different concepts: the former means "to be at (the) work(place)", the latter "I work for company X".

So, if your buddy calls you and says:
"Moi! Mis sä oot?"
You might answer:
"Duunis."

On the other hand, if someone asks you what you do for a living, you could reply with:
"Mä oon duunis Nokialla."

The above is in what I consider to be fairly standard colloquial Helsinki dialect, as spoken by people in the age bracket 15-30, or so. Duuni, by the way, is a word that very few outside the Greater Helsinki area would use, which is part of the joke in the hedgehog strip. Not that I'm a big fan of Kiroileva siili.

Edit:
Took out my usual disclaimers about the uncertainty of this, that and the other--and the post is better for it.

Edited by sans-serif on 30 January 2013 at 9:37am

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cathrynm
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United States
junglevision.co
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Studies: Japanese, Finnish

 
 Message 267 of 541
30 January 2013 at 8:54am | IP Logged 
Well, it's not self-evident to me, at least. Duuni -- totally new word for me.
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
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Joined 5424 days ago

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20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 268 of 541
04 February 2013 at 4:44am | IP Logged 
BCMS/SC

I finished reviewing Chapter 2 of "Spoken World: Croatian" and as noted earlier continued to do passive shadowing in Chapter of "Teach Yourself Serbian. The former refreshed my knowledge of the present tense, plural for nominative and accusative, and the possessive pronouns.



(From Pravni forum Mojepravo.net · Pogledaj temu - Karikature i smiješni stripovi :)

"New mosque? - No! A press conference with President Bush!"

- džamija (džamije) "mosque" (џамија (џамије))

Convention for vocabulary in the comic strip that's unfamiliar to me (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary) (this will be put in both scripts partially to accommodate those unused to Serbian Cyrillic and also so that I get at least a little bit of practice using the keyboard layout for Serbian Cyrillic).

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (1st person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb], 3rd person plural present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb])
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

FINNISH

I finished Chapter 30 of "Kuulostaa hyvältä". See here for more information on what was covered.



(From Viivi ja Wagner 16.8.2011 - Ajassa - Plaza)

1) "Mm... Popcorn!"
2) "Hey, [put the] lid on!"

- paukkumaissi (paukkumaissin, paukkumaissia, paukkumaisseja) "popcorn" (coexists with popcorn (popcornin, popcornia, popcorneja)

Convention for unfamiliar vocabulary in the comic strip (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular, partitive singular, partitive plural)
VERBS: 1st infinitive (1st person singular present tense, 3rd person singular past simple tense, active past participle)
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

POLISH

I finished Chapter 13 of "Polish in 4 weeks - II". The dialogue was about Ela helping Basia to write a letter to complain about poor service by the post office. The main topics for grammar were verbs that take the preposition o and using the impersonal verbs należy, nie wolno, powinno się, and trzeba)



(From Hagar Horrendalny - Joe Monster)

1) "What'll you have Hägar? - How should I know? Surprise me."
2) "He wants us to surprise him. Pour a glass of milk for him."

Convention for vocabulary in the comic strip that's unfamiliar to me (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (nominative plural, genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (1st person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb], 2nd person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb])
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

SLOVAK

I did my week's allotment of at least 3 pages from "Hovorme spolu po slovensky! B - Slovenčina ako cudzí jazyk" by working through pgs. 16-19 of the first workbook which consisted of exercises on the relative pronoun ktorý/á/é and more exercises on the nominative plural.



(From Kyanid a Šťastie V. | The Secret Life of Sagara)

1) "Daddy, look! That angry dog is hurting my cat."
2) "Hey you dumb bastard*, why won't you pick on someone your own size?"
4) "I'm an idiot, idiot, idiot, idiot..."

*This was a fan's translation and I would replace that Anglicism with the colloquial hajzel))

Convention for vocabulary in the comic strip that's unfamiliar to me (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (3rd person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb], 3rd person plural present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb])
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

UKRAINIAN

I did my week's allotment of at least 3 pages from "Modern Ukrainian" by working through pgs. 18 and 36-37. The exercises provided practice with using the conjunction a and i, vocative and present tense. I also finished some more homework about the genitive for my class.


***

OTHER LANGUAGES

February's first deadline for Hungarian is coming up.

______


2 persons have voted this message useful



sans-serif
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Finland
Joined 2827 days ago

298 posts - 470 votes 
Speaks: Finnish*, English, German, Swedish
Studies: Danish

 
 Message 269 of 541
04 February 2013 at 3:32pm | IP Logged 
I don't think I've ever heard anyone use the word 'paukkumaissi' other than jokingly. It's a good example of what I like to call Aku Ankka -kieli: colourful, often humoristic, slightly non-standard language that employs lots of synonyms and witty metaphors, and inevitably comes off as chatty.

Note that "Kansi päälle!" can also be interpreted as "A lid for the head!", since pää = head. :-)

Edited by sans-serif on 05 February 2013 at 7:43am

1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
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Joined 5424 days ago

4228 posts - 8254 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 270 of 541
11 February 2013 at 6:27am | IP Logged 
HUNGARIAN

I have finished Selection 3 of "FSI Hungarian Graded Reader". The text was a fairly bland one about the seasons. The accompanying exercises involved forming present particples that end in -ó/-ő and getting familiar with the derivational suffix -ul/-ül which converts nouns or adjectives to verbs that refer to a change of state into that noun or adjective (e.g. zöld “green” ~ zöldülni “to become green”). I also completed a few more exercises from “Magyarországon szeretnék dolgozni” in eMagyarul-2 which by coincidence focused on the present participle suffix -ó/-ő.



(From Kázmér és Huba – Képeslap.com)

1) "How did you like the kids' matinée at the movies?"
2) "Movies? Right, the movies! Yes, there was a movie. It was really good, I think."
3) "What was the matinée like?"
4) "We will buy a video!"

Convention for unfamiliar vocabulary in the comic strip (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (nouns only: nominative possessive for 3rd person singular)
VERBS: 3rd person singular present tense (infinitive)
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

SLOVAK

I did my week's allotment of Slovak by finishing the remaining exercises in the first chapter of the first workbook (pp. 19-21) of "Hovorme spolu po slovensky! B - Slovenčina ako cudzí jazyk". These exercises were for the relative pronoun ktorý/á/é and adjectives that function as nouns (e.g. cestovné “expense [related to travelling]”).



(From Shooty - … som Grogy via Snow Cherries from France)

1) "Every vote counts." (literally “Every vote/voice can decide”)
7) "A better system than democracy has not been thought up by anyone."

Convention for vocabulary in the comic strip that's unfamiliar to me (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (3rd person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb], 3rd person plural present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb])
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

TURKISH

I finished Unit 5 of "Teach Yourself Beginner's Turkish". The unit's dialogues and notes introduced the imperative, dative and ablative via common phrases involving directions or locations.

***

UKRAINIAN

I finished more homework about the genitive for my class but unfortunately did not make it for this week's allotment of finishing at least 3 pages from "Modern Ukrainian". Since last week, I’ve managed to complete only a few exercises from pg. 38 which focus on the present tense.

***

OTHER LANGUAGES

The next deadline for BCMS/SC is drawing near. I feel bad for not studying any Finnish since my previous entry (I don’t count repeated watching of the video for Chapter 31 of “Kuulostaa hyvältä” in the interim as studying).
______



Edited by Chung on 11 February 2013 at 6:40am

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sin123ned
Triglot
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Germany
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Speaks: English, Spanish*, German
Studies: Turkish
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 271 of 541
11 February 2013 at 1:55pm | IP Logged 
That's awesome Chung!! I don't think I have the ability to concentrate on more than one language at a time. That takes brains !!

1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5424 days ago

4228 posts - 8254 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 272 of 541
18 February 2013 at 6:20am | IP Logged 
BCMS/SC

I finished reviewing Chapter 3 of "Beginner’s Serbian" and Chapter 4 of "Teach Yourself Serbian". The former refreshed my knowledge of adjectives, adverbs, and possessive and demonstrative pronouns. The latter’s dialogues involved ordering at restaurants and focused on the direct object and quantifying items ordered in "low" quantities (i.e. no more than 4 items). The counting system in BCMS/SC is such that items quantified between 2 and 4 are put in genitive singular as in Russian but unlike the treatment in Czech, Polish, Slovak and Ukrainian which use nominative plural in this situation.



(From Strip Vesti – internet nedeljnik (Cane))

1) "There’s no rescue for me. Lost. In the middle of the ocean. I’m drinking the last can of beer."
2) "Can of beer. Beer."
3) "Why the hell won’t you wake him up?" – Wake him up? Not a chance. Now it’s getting interesting. Besides, don’t you see that I’m recording this? – Beer… beer… beer…"

- pobogu (intensifier of vague spiritual nature linked to an interrogative pronoun) (побогу)
- postajati > postati (postajem, postaju > postanem, postanu) "to become" (постајати > постати (постајем, постају > постанем, постану))
- snimati > snimiti (snimam, snimaju > snimim, snime) "to record, register" (снимати > снимити (снимам, снимају > снимим, сниме))
- spas (spasa) "salvation; rescue" (спас (спаса))

Convention for vocabulary in the comic strip that's unfamiliar to me (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary) (this will be put in both scripts partially to accommodate those unused to Serbian Cyrillic and also so that I get at least a little bit of practice using the keyboard layout for Serbian Cyrillic).

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (1st person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb], 3rd person plural present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb])
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

FINNISH

I finished Chapter 31 of "Kuulostaa hyvältä". The chapter’s dialogue invovled Jutta and Anssi taking in some paintings by Gallen-Kallela at the Ateneum in Helsinki. The first point of "new" grammar was the use of the active past particple translative as part of a structure to mark unplanned or unintended past events. This structure concisely but silently adds a tag along the lines of "…as it turned out/happened", "…by the way" or "… and/but you should (not) have" which indicates a certain judgement on the user’s part. The second point of grammar was the instructive case which is practically limited to set phrases and declension of the second infinitive after having its banal sense of "by means of" mostly assumed by the semantically similar adessive case.

Tulin käyneeksi viikonloppuna myös Kuopiossa. "[As it happened] I also visited Kuopio on the weekend"

(Ystävällisin) terveisin "(With friendly) regards" (ending for a letter or card).
Jaakko lähti huutaen rivouksia luotani "Jaakko left my place shouting obscenities [all the while]."



(From Sarjakuvat)

1) "I said that I’m not sick! What is that? Does it hurt? – This is just a tongue depressor. It doesn’t hurt at all."
2) "What is that? Does it hurt? – It’s a stethoscope. It doesn’t hurt at all."
3) "What is that? Does it hurt? – This is an otoscope. It hurts slightly less than burning iron."
4) "Little children do not have a sense of humor."

- hieman "slightly"
- korvatähystin (korvatähystimen, korvatähystintä, korvatähystimiä) "otoscope" (literally: "ear-monitor")

Convention for unfamiliar vocabulary in the comic strip (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular, partitive singular, partitive plural)
VERBS: 1st infinitive (1st person singular present tense, 3rd person singular past simple tense, active past participle)
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

POLISH

I finished Chapter 14 of "Polish in 4 Weeks - II". The dialogue (if one can call it that) consisted of a few e-mails between Alice and Basia about the latter looking for a new job. The main topics for grammar were time expressions that use the preposition od, adjectives ending in –letni (e.g. czteroletnie doświadczenie "4 years of experience"), past tense of verbs ending in -ąć (e.g. zacząć "to start") and declension of feminine nouns ending in certain consonants (e.g. podróż, rzecz)



(From Tori Komix – Komix #591 – 02/13/2013)

1) "Benedict XVI announced that he will resign on February 28."
2) "Maybe we’ll never beat Germany in soccer. Maybe we’re jealous of them for their income."
3) "But we beat them when it comes to the length of the papacy."

- kadencja papieży (kadencje papieży, kadencji papieży) "papal term of office, papacy"

Convention for vocabulary in the comic strip that's unfamiliar to me (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (nominative plural, genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (1st person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb], 2nd person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb])
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

SLOVAK

I did my week's allotment of at least 3 pages from "Hovorme spolu po slovensky! B - Slovenčina ako cudzí jazyk" by working through pgs. 19-22 of the first textbook which consisted of exercises on vocabulary related to leisure or spending vacation, and verbal aspect.



(From Kyanid a Šťastie II. | The Secret Life of Sagara)

1) "I already know what I’ll go out as on Halloween."
2) "All that I need is one sheet and I’m a ghost!"
3) "Scary, huh?"
6) "I’ll go scare the washing machine."

- desivý/-á/-é (desivého/-ej/-ého) "scary"
- strašiť > na/po/prestrašiť (straší, strašia > na/po/prestraší, na/po/prestrašia) "to haunt; frighten, scare"

(Ed. It's interesting to me that the perfective aspect can have three variants whose meanings don’t seem to differ much after inspecting a couple of Slovak dictionaries

Convention for vocabulary in the comic strip that's unfamiliar to me (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (3rd person singular present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb], 3rd person plural present tense [imperfective verb] / future tense [perfective verb])
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

UKRAINIAN

I did my week's allotment of at least 3 pages from "Modern Ukrainian" by working through pgs. 38-40. The exercises provided practice with using the present tense, reading/listening comprehension and creating logical questions or statements to correspond to responses given. I still need to finish some homework for my class consisting of exercises in genitive.


***

OTHER LANGUAGES

The next deadline for Hungarian is drawing near. I also managed to finish the first draft of the section for adpositions in the guide to Uralic languages. As with the sections on direct objects and possession, I devised several sentences comparing the use of adpositions and humbly ask for feedback about them. As always, I’m not expecting anyone here to chip in with corrections for the Northern Saami (let alone the Meadow Mari) but here’s to holding out hope :-)

"We are at home because of the cold weather." / "On account of the cold weather, we are at home."

Estonian: Oleme kodus külma ilma tõttu.
Finnish: Olemme kotona kylmän sään vuoksi.
Northern Saami: Mii leat ruovttus galbma dálkki dihte.
Meadow Mari: Йÿштö игечылан кöра ме мöҥгыштö улына.
Hungarian: A hideg idő miatt itthon vagyunk.

"Anna is standing behind the door."

Estonian: Anna seisab ukse taga.
Finnish: Anna seisoo oven takana.
Northern Saami: Ánne čuožžu uvssa duohkin.
Meadow Mari: Анна омса шеҥгелне шога.
Hungarian: Anna az ajtó mögött áll.

"Since Christmas I have had a new car."

Estonian: Jõulust saadik minul on uus auto.
Finnish: Joulusta lähtien minulla on uusi auto.
Northern Saami: Juovllaid rájes mus lea ođđa biila.
Meadow Mari: Рошто годсек мыйын у машинам уло.
Hungarian: Karácsony óta új kocsim van.

"I’ll arrive (with)in three days."

Estonian: Mina saabun kolme päeva pärast.
Finnish: Minä pääsen kolmen päivän kuluessa.
Northern Saami: Mun beasan golmma beaivvi geahčái.
Meadow Mari: Кум кече гыч толын шуам.
Hungarian: Három napon belül megérkezem.

"Will you be at home before Christmas?"

Estonian: Kas sa oled enne jõulu kodus?
Finnish: Oletko kotona ennen joulua?
Northern Saami: Leatgo don ruovttus ovdal juovllaid?
Meadow Mari: Тый мöҥгыштö Pошто деч ончыч лият мо?
Hungarian: Leszel otthon Karácsony előtt?

Estonian:

"Kadri and Toomas will go to Spain in a week."
- Kadri ja Toomas lähevad nädala pärast Hispaaniasse.

"After work Kadri will buy the tickets."
- Pärast tööd ostab Kadri lennupiletid.

Finnish:

"Katri and Tuomas live near Lappeenranta."
- Katri ja Tuomas asuvat Lappeenrannan lähellä.
- Katri ja Tuomas asuvat lähellä Lappeenrantaa.

Hungarian:

"Kati is watching the movie together with Tamás."
- Kati a filmet Tamással együtt nézi.
- Kati a filmet együtt Tamással nézi.

"I am from Helsinki." (i.e. "My hometown is Helsinki.")

Estonian: Mina olen pärit Helsingist.
Finnish: Minä olen kotoisin Helsingistä.
Northern Saami: Mun lean eret Helssegis.
Meadow Mari: Мый Хельсинки гыч улам.
Hungarian: Én Helsinkiből származom.


"Thomas thinks about/of Kate."

Estonian: Toomas mõtleb Kadrile
Finnish: Tuomas ajattelee Katria.
Northern Saami: Duommá jurddaša Gádjá birra.
Meadow Mari: Фома Катя нерген шона.
Hungarian: Tamás gondol Katira.

Estonian:

"Kadri is thinking of Toomas."
- Kadri mõtleb Toomase peale.
- Kadri mõtleb Toomasele.

Finnish:

"Tuomas went to Imatra without Katri."
- Tuomas lähti Imatralle ilman Katria.
- Tuomas lähti Imatralle Katritta.

"I am standing beside you. You are standing beside Kate."

Estonian: Mina seisan sinu kõrval. Sina seisad Kadri kõrval.
Finnish: Minä seison sinun vierellesi. Sinä seisot Katrin vierellä.
Northern Saami: Mun čuoččun du guoras. Don čuoččut Gádjá guoras.
Meadow Mari: Мый (тыйын) воктенет шогем. Тый Катя воктен шогет.
Hungarian: Állok melletted. Te állsz Kati mellett.

______




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