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Chung at work / Chung pri práci

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sans-serif
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Finland
Joined 2961 days ago

298 posts - 470 votes 
Speaks: Finnish*, English, German, Swedish
Studies: Danish

 
 Message 241 of 541
06 January 2013 at 7:06pm | IP Logged 
(The short answer is I have no idea, so don't quote me on this)

I don't remember ever confusing a pair of words like that, at least. My guess is that it's not very common to needlessly stretch the last A in speech, and the few times it does happen, the case can be deduced from the context. As for informal online Finnish, people mostly stretch out the nominative ihana, I think.

Edited by sans-serif on 06 January 2013 at 7:10pm

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Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5558 days ago

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20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 242 of 541
11 January 2013 at 6:31am | IP Logged 
POLISH

I finished Chapter 10 of "Polish in 4 weeks - II". The main topics for grammar involved dative plural, the declension of the reflexive pronoun (się), and accusative/genitive forms of cardinal numerals. The focus for vocabulary involved phrases or words for character traits.



(From Zbity z tropu: Mówisz - myślisz)

1) "[When] you say "ski jumping", you think Adam Małysz"
2) "[When] you say "cross country skiing", you think Justyna Kowalczyk"
3) "[When] you say "swimming", you think Otylia Jędzrejczak"
4) "[When] you say "basketball", you think Marcin Gortat"
5) "[When] you say "soccer", you think..."
6) "Ғц¢ќ!"

Convention for unfamiliar (to me) vocabulary in the comic strip (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (nominative plural, genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (1st person singular present tense, 2nd person singular present tense)
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

SLOVAK

I did my week's allotment of at least 3 pages from my course "Hovorme spolu po slovensky! B - Slovenčina ako cudzí jazyk" by working through pgs. 9-12 of the 1st textbook. I did exercises involving nominative plural and declension of the relative pronoun ktorý "that, which, who".

Since only the course's exercise book has an answer key, I'm curious to see how I fared with one of the textbook's exercises.

Bortlíková et al. “Hovorme spolu po slovensky! B - Slovenčina ako cudzí jazyk. Učebnica / 1. časť”. Bratislava: 2008, pp. 10-11 wrote:
2. Vety napíšte v pluráli. Ostatné pády okrem nominativu nemeňte.

Chung wrote:

a. Na stole sú prázdne fľaše, šálky, poháre a špinavé príbory.
b. Nie všetci lekári pracujú v nemocnici.
c. Mestské múzea sú v pondelok zatvorené.
d. Včera nám nefungovali tranzistorové rádia ani televízor.
e. Jeho kolegovia sú tiež ekonómi.
f. V novinách boli zaujímavé reportáže o emigrantoch.
g. Tieto reštauráce nemajú klimatizáciu.
h. Tu môžu hrať golf len členovia klubu.
ch. Irenini strýkovia žijú v zahraničí.
i. Nové hotely ležia priamo na pláží.
j. Moji švagrovia sú starší ako moji bratia.
k. V zime sú noci dlhé a dni sú krátke.
l. Tieto akčné filmy nie sú pre deti.
m. Počítačove myši a monitory sa často kazia.
n. Títo futbalisti nie sú Bratislavčania.
o. Moje netere sú už vydaté a synovcovia sú ženatí.
p. Posledné týždni ubehli veľmi rýchlo.
q. V tejto kancelárii sedia len úradnici.
r. Dávaj pozor, tie kuchynské nože sú veľmi ostré.
s. Na univerzite študujú Slováci, Maďari, Česi a Ukrajinci.
t. Pracovné stretnutia trvali až do večera.
u. Ich deti sú rozmaznané.
v. Postele v hoteli boli tvrdé a nepohodlné.
w. V internátoch sú aj študentské jedálne.
x. Magdini synovia a Petrove dcéry išli na prázdniny k babke.
y. Listky do divadla stoja asi dvesto korún.
z. Modré koberce sa hodia k hnedému nábytku.




(From Shooty - ...som Grogy via Snow Cherries from France)

3) "Was your homework erased by the bad boys?!"
4) "On the steep bank waaaalked Katyusha, On the hiiiigh sssssteep bank." [Russian] (See here for more information on this folk-like song from the USSR and here for a performance)
7) "Get up! You slept in!"
8) "Dad, we have to go to school!"
9) "Noooooot to school!!! Noooooo!!!"

gumovať > vygumovať (-uje, -ujú > -uje, -ujú) "to rub out"

Convention for unfamiliar vocabulary in the comic strip (i.e. needed to consult a dictionary)

NOUNS & ADJECTIVES: nominative singular (genitive singular)
VERBS (where applicable using convention of imperfective > perfective): infinitive (3rd person singular present tense, 3rd person plural present tense)
ADVERBS & INTERJECTIONS: no extra information given

***

UKRAINIAN

I finished Unit 17 of "Teach Yourself Ukrainian". The unit's dialogues and notes introduced formally the formation of the imperative which I've noted here under "Difficulties" is quite complex to form, alternation of vowels (including fleeting vowels) in declension, and words that are either singular or plural only (e.g. відпочинок "vacation" (sing. only), дебати "debate" (plur. only))

***

OTHER LANGUAGES

I haven't worked on other languages since my previous entry, and with a couple of evening classes restarting by next week (including the Ukrainian ones), I expect to have less time during the workweek to study my languages (or at least the frequency that I can put down entries will lessen a bit). I'm starting to think that after having finished "Teach Yourself Ukrainian" in the coming week I'll start to study Ukrainian independently similarly to how I'm working on Slovak. Namely I'll do 3-5 pages worth of exercises per week from "Modern Ukrainian" which should neatly supplement whatever I get from my Ukrainian classes.
______


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maxval
Pentaglot
Senior Member
Bulgaria
maxval.co.nr
Joined 3475 days ago

852 posts - 1577 votes 
Speaks: Hungarian*, Bulgarian, English, Spanish, Russian
Studies: Latin, Modern Hebrew

 
 Message 243 of 541
11 January 2013 at 10:04am | IP Logged 
I dont know whether you study BCMS too, but this is funny:



Translation: "What are these marks?"

(Is it called "mark" in English? I am not sure. Or is it called "score"?)

Edited by maxval on 11 January 2013 at 10:06am

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Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5558 days ago

4228 posts - 8256 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 244 of 541
11 January 2013 at 4:57pm | IP Logged 
It's funny that you bring this up since I was leafing through a few courses for BCMS yesterday evening, and finding out how much I could decipher or remember based on my studies of the language from several years ago.

maxval wrote:
Translation: "What are these marks?"

(Is it called "mark" in English? I am not sure. Or is it called "score"?)


A "mark" is supposed to refer to a discrete figure/percentage be it on an piece of homework or the report card. A "grade" is supposed to be the letter that corresponds to a range of these marks/figures (e.g. A+ is often shorthand for a mark between 90 and 100) (reference: Proz)

However colloquially the meanings of the terms are mixed up with a common stereotype that Americans use "grade" more often and even to mean "mark", while Britons and Canadians tend to use "mark" more often than "grade".
3 persons have voted this message useful



maxval
Pentaglot
Senior Member
Bulgaria
maxval.co.nr
Joined 3475 days ago

852 posts - 1577 votes 
Speaks: Hungarian*, Bulgarian, English, Spanish, Russian
Studies: Latin, Modern Hebrew

 
 Message 245 of 541
11 January 2013 at 6:12pm | IP Logged 
Chung wrote:
It's funny that you bring this up since I was leafing through a few
courses for BCMS yesterday evening, and finding out how much I could decipher or
remember based on my studies of the language from several years ago.

maxval wrote:
Translation: "What are these marks?"

(Is it called "mark" in English? I am not sure. Or is it called "score"?)


A "mark" is supposed to refer to a discrete figure/percentage be it on an piece of
homework or the report card. A "grade" is supposed to be the letter that corresponds to
a range of these marks/figures (e.g. A+ is often shorthand for a mark between 90 and
100) (reference: grade_vs_mark.html">Proz)

However colloquially the meanings of the terms are mixed up with a common stereotype
that Americans use "grade" more often and even to mean "mark", while Britons and
Canadians tend to use "mark" more often than "grade".


OK, thanks, so grade is a better word for this.

It is also interesting to compare the different systems of grades in different
countries. There is no unification in this!

In Hungary the grade system is between 1 and 5, 1 is the worst, it means failed, so
there are 5 possible grades. This has been introduced since after the WWII, before that
it was 5 the worst grade, and 1 the best.

In Bulgaria it is between 2 and 6, 2 meaning failed, so it is also a 5-grade system,
only the numeration is different.

The US system seems to be also a 5-grade system, however I dont understand exactly why
E is called sometimes F, when - as I know - they mean the same.

In Russia there is a 4-grad system: from 2 to 5, 2 meaning failed.
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hribecek
Triglot
Senior Member
Czech Republic
Joined 3751 days ago

1243 posts - 1458 votes 
Speaks: English*, Czech, Spanish
Studies: Italian, Polish, Slovak, Hungarian, Toki Pona, Russian

 
 Message 246 of 541
11 January 2013 at 6:52pm | IP Logged 
maxval wrote:


It is also interesting to compare the different systems of grades in different
countries. There is no unification in this!

In Hungary the grade system is between 1 and 5, 1 is the worst, it means failed, so
there are 5 possible grades. This has been introduced since after the WWII, before that
it was 5 the worst grade, and 1 the best.

In Bulgaria it is between 2 and 6, 2 meaning failed, so it is also a 5-grade system,
only the numeration is different.

The US system seems to be also a 5-grade system, however I dont understand exactly why
E is called sometimes F, when - as I know - they mean the same.

In Russia there is a 4-grad system: from 2 to 5, 2 meaning failed.
Any idea why Russia and Bulgaria don't have a 1 in their system?

In Czech Republic it's 1-5 with 1 being the best and 5 a fail, so the same as Hungary before the war.

In England when I was at school it was A-G for GCSE level (at age 16, the last compulsory exams before the option to leave education and go to work.) A was the best. Then there was also U meaning fail or "ungraded". I don't know if they still use this system though, I guess so.

At A level (age 16-18) it is A-E (A the best) with an N after that which means "near miss" and does actually count for something in university applications and then U.

Edited by hribecek on 11 January 2013 at 6:54pm

1 person has voted this message useful



maxval
Pentaglot
Senior Member
Bulgaria
maxval.co.nr
Joined 3475 days ago

852 posts - 1577 votes 
Speaks: Hungarian*, Bulgarian, English, Spanish, Russian
Studies: Latin, Modern Hebrew

 
 Message 247 of 541
11 January 2013 at 7:15pm | IP Logged 
hribecek wrote:

Any idea why Russia and Bulgaria don't have a 1 in their system?


In Bulgaria the system originally was 6-graded, from 1 to 6, however 1 and 2 have been
unified, this is the reason.

For Russia I dont know, but I suppose there may be a similar reason.

The name of the grades are also interesting. In the case of Bulgaria you can see from
the names that it was originally a 6-grade system.

Hungary:
5 - jeles - excellent
4 - jó - good
3 - közepes - medium
2 - elégséges - sufficient
1 - elégtelen - insufficient

Bulgaria:
6 - отличен - excellent
5 - много добър - very good
4 - добър - good
3 - среден - medium
2 - слаб - weak

Edited by maxval on 11 January 2013 at 7:28pm

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TianaTakano
Diglot
Newbie
Russian FederationRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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6 posts - 7 votes
Speaks: Russian*, English
Studies: Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Polish

 
 Message 248 of 541
12 January 2013 at 7:24pm | IP Logged 
In Russia, the official grading system in schools is:

5 - пятёрка (отлично) - excellent
4 - четвёрка (хорошо) - good
3 - тройка (удовлетворительно or посредственно) - sufficient
2 - двойка (неудовлетворительно) - insufficient
1 - единица or кол (неудовлетворительно) insufficient

Grade '1' does exist, but it is rarely used. Teachers give it when they angry with an unruly student or when the teacher is pissed off that students haven't done their homework again. They prefer giving 1 in such cases, because it is easy to convert it into 4 if the student submits the homework next time or does an additional project to improve the grade.

In general, it's true that grades 2 to 5 are mostly used.


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