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Listening-Reading system

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies (Topic Closed Topic Closed) Post Reply
489 messages over 62 pages: 13 4 5 6 7 ... 2 ... 61 62 Next >>
Volte
Tetraglot
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Switzerland
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Speaks: English*, Esperanto, German, Italian
Studies: French, Finnish, Mandarin, Japanese

 
 Message 9 of 489
26 June 2007 at 12:59pm | IP Logged 
siomotteikiru wrote:
Audiobooks for major languages are easily available, use p2p or Internet shops. Libraries for visually disabled people are a great scource, too.

I've been collecting audiobooks for years, so I have thousands of them in many languages.


How do you find corresponding texts in other languages (Polish, I guess, in your case)? A lot of translations aren't very exact, and a lot of audio books are abridged.

How do you decide which authors and books are worth your time?


Edited by Volte on 26 June 2007 at 1:00pm

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siomotteikiru
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Zaire
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 Message 10 of 489
26 June 2007 at 1:09pm | IP Logged 
To Volte

I remember doing some parallel texts for foreign learners of Polish: Kafka, Bulgakov, Andersen, Camus (the authors I like very much), but I do not remember if there were any for English speaking people, I’d have to check.

Unfortunately, the translations of Polish books into English or Frencch or even Russian I’ve seen are not very good. Polish translations of good world literature are usually much better and easy to get.

I do not use abridged books (it is good for barbarians).


Edited by siomotteikiru on 26 June 2007 at 3:01pm

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Volte
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Switzerland
Joined 4599 days ago

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Speaks: English*, Esperanto, German, Italian
Studies: French, Finnish, Mandarin, Japanese

 
 Message 11 of 489
26 June 2007 at 1:24pm | IP Logged 
siomotteikiru wrote:

I remember doing some parallel texts for foreign learners of Polish: Kafka, Bulgakov, Andersen, Camus (the authors I like very much), but I do not remember if there were any for English speaking people, I’d have to check.

Unforturnately, the translations of Polish books into English or Frencch or even Russian I’ve seen are not very good. Polish translations of good world literature are usually much better and easy to get.


Have you tried using your method in reverse, listening to a language you already know and reading one you don't? How much less effective is it?

I've found that watching movies with Dutch subtitles, in English, helps my Dutch comprehension quite a bit - but I don't really like watching movies, so I do this rarely.

siomotteikiru wrote:

I do not use abridged books (it is good for barbarians).

I can't stand abridged books - I'm just wondering how you manage to avoid them, since abridging books, especially for audio, seems all too common.

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reineke
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United States
https://learnalangua
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 Message 12 of 489
26 June 2007 at 2:00pm | IP Logged 
It's kinda difficult to find texts/audiobooks that overlap perfectly.
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Volte
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Switzerland
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Speaks: English*, Esperanto, German, Italian
Studies: French, Finnish, Mandarin, Japanese

 
 Message 13 of 489
26 June 2007 at 2:06pm | IP Logged 
reineke wrote:
It's kinda difficult to find texts/audiobooks that overlap perfectly.


Exactly - this is why I'm asking for advice.

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siomotteikiru
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Zaire
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 Message 14 of 489
26 June 2007 at 2:12pm | IP Logged 
To Volte

I do not read anything without simultaneously listening to it before I have mastered proper pronunciation (by listening, listening to minimal pairs/ phonemes and then repeating after the recording - "shadowing").

Knowing a language involes four skills:
listening, reading, speaking, writing
and four subsystems:
pronuncitation, vacabulary, grammar and discourse(=how to make texts).

They are all interdependent, and reading without listening is counterproductive.

A Russian friend of mine was doing the following:
To increase input, he listened to the Russian text (synthesized audio) and looked at the target text, he said it worked for him, but his pronunciation was not very good, to put it mildly.

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frenkeld
Diglot
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United States
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 Message 15 of 489
26 June 2007 at 2:21pm | IP Logged 
reineke wrote:
It's kinda difficult to find texts/audiobooks that overlap perfectly.


I can see that being the case with classics, that often come in slightly (or not so slightly) different versions, but shouldn't an unabridged audiobook edition of a modern novel match the orginal?

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Volte
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Switzerland
Joined 4599 days ago

4474 posts - 6724 votes 
Speaks: English*, Esperanto, German, Italian
Studies: French, Finnish, Mandarin, Japanese

 
 Message 16 of 489
26 June 2007 at 2:24pm | IP Logged 
siomotteikiru wrote:
To Volte
I do not read anything without simultaneously listening to it before I have mastered proper pronunciation (by listening, listening to minimal pairs/ phonemes and then repeating after the recording - "shadowing").


Ahhhh, good to know. I've tried reading before knowing how to pronounce things in some languages (all of the ones I'm currently studying other than Persian, actually). This doesn't seem to be a big problem for German, where correct pronunciation came to me extremely quickly after I started shadowing (within a week) but I think that it has impeded me in the others.

siomotteikiru wrote:

Knowing a language involes four skills:
listening, reading, speaking, writing
and four subsystems:
pronuncitation, vacabulary, grammar and discourse(=how to make texts).

They are all interdependent, and reading without listening is counterproductive.


Well, it helps with reading, but I agree, it is counterproductive for speaking correctly, and it makes it much easier to get mixed up.

siomotteikiru wrote:

A Russian friend of mine was doing the following:
To increase input, he listened to the Russian text (synthesized audio) and looked at the target text, he said it worked for him, but his pronunciation was not very good, to put it mildly.


I can't stand listening to synthesized speech, in any language I've heard it in. I'd rather have no model than a synthesized one.



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