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Listening-Reading system

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies (Topic Closed Topic Closed) Post Reply
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audiolang
Diglot
Senior Member
Romania
Joined 4429 days ago

108 posts - 109 votes 
2 sounds
Speaks: Romanian*, English

 
 Message 281 of 489
17 August 2007 at 12:22pm | IP Logged 
reineke wrote:
Since you're in Europe you only need to point a dish towards Eutelsat/Astra.

And that's exactly what I'm doing.Satellite TV is the reason I got into languages.
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JasonChoi
Diglot
Senior Member
Korea, South
Joined 4468 days ago

274 posts - 298 votes 
Speaks: English*, Korean
Studies: Mandarin, Cantonese, Latin

 
 Message 282 of 489
17 August 2007 at 9:35pm | IP Logged 
Wings wrote:
Note: if you have a friend who speaks your target language they can read for you; anything you want as long as it’s done privately. Maybe we can set up a link offering our services as English speakers, and in turn attract native speakers of our target language to do the same.


This is precisely what I did with Latin. I had a friend read the entire Tridentine Mass text, as well as the gospel of Mark in Latin. The problem however, is that I find myself getting bored (perhaps I chose the wrong thing to listen to, or maybe I'm not doing it correctly).

A native Korean speaker did the same for me as well.

Edited by JasonChoi on 17 August 2007 at 9:35pm

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slucido
Bilingual Diglot
Senior Member
Spain
https://goo.gl/126Yv
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1296 posts - 1781 votes 
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Speaks: Spanish*, Catalan*
Studies: English

 
 Message 283 of 489
18 August 2007 at 4:08pm | IP Logged 
I have read all this thread and I have a question.

If you have good reading skills in a language, but bad listening skills, how can you adapt this system to develop natural listening skills. Supposing our goal is only to develop native-like listening skills.


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traveller
Triglot
Newbie
Switzerland
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11 posts - 11 votes
Speaks: French*, English, Russian
Studies: Mandarin

 
 Message 284 of 489
20 August 2007 at 3:17pm | IP Logged 
The only audiobook in Chinese with a written translation in English or French that I found is the Bible. Could I use the listening-reading method with it despite the fact that I am not religious at all?


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FSI
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4468 days ago

550 posts - 590 votes 
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 285 of 489
20 August 2007 at 3:29pm | IP Logged 
slucido wrote:
I have read all this thread and I have a question.

If you have good reading skills in a language, but bad listening skills, how can you adapt this system to develop natural listening skills. Supposing our goal is only to develop native-like listening skills.



Easy - just alternate between reading the l1 and reading the l2 while listening to the l2 each time. Once you can understand the l2 text as well as you understand the l1 text, start using solely the l2 text along with the l2 audio. The only difference between this and the regular listen-reading is the lack of stage 3 - orally shadowing the l2 audio while reading the l2 text. This way, you won't learn to speak, but you'll still learn to read and listen like a native.
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slucido
Bilingual Diglot
Senior Member
Spain
https://goo.gl/126Yv
Joined 4784 days ago

1296 posts - 1781 votes 
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Speaks: Spanish*, Catalan*
Studies: English

 
 Message 286 of 489
23 August 2007 at 1:23pm | IP Logged 
FSI wrote:
slucido wrote:
I have read all this thread and I have a question.

If you have good reading skills in a language, but bad listening skills, how can you adapt this system to develop natural listening skills. Supposing our goal is only to develop native-like listening skills.



Easy - just alternate between reading the l1 and reading the l2 while listening to the l2 each time. Once you can understand the l2 text as well as you understand the l1 text, start using solely the l2 text along with the l2 audio. The only difference between this and the regular listen-reading is the lack of stage 3 - orally shadowing the l2 audio while reading the l2 text. This way, you won't learn to speak, but you'll still learn to read and listen like a native.


Thank you. This method can be very useful, but it is not easy to find ten hours every day for three days.

Why don't use a step listening only L2 without reading neither L2 or L1 texts? I think it basic.

I am using a variation that I find very useful. I speed up the L2 audio every time a listen it. I use audacity.

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FSI
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4468 days ago

550 posts - 590 votes 
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 287 of 489
23 August 2007 at 1:35pm | IP Logged 
slucido wrote:

Thank you. This method can be very useful, but it is not easy to find ten hours every day for three days.

Why don't use a step listening only L2 without reading neither L2 or L1 texts? I think it basic.

I am using a variation that I find very useful. I speed up the L2 audio every time a listen it. I use audacity.


No problem. It's a good idea to try variations. One change I made was reducing the time I spent doing it each day. If ten hours is too much, perhaps try fewer hours, until you find a number you can keep to.

I agree speeding up the audio can help, as long as you can still understand it :^) The reason I suggest alternating between the L1 and L2 texts while listening to the L2 is so you can match what you hear to what you read. But if you can already read the L2 well, then you don't need the L1, and could just read the L2 while listening to the L2. That way, you can pick up (by reading) anything you miss in the audio.

If you use the audio by itself, there won't be a way to learn the parts of it you don't understand. That's where the text is useful; it's like subtitles for your audiobook.
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slucido
Bilingual Diglot
Senior Member
Spain
https://goo.gl/126Yv
Joined 4784 days ago

1296 posts - 1781 votes 
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 Message 288 of 489
25 August 2007 at 10:56am | IP Logged 
FSI wrote:

I agree speeding up the audio can help, as long as you can still understand it :^) The reason I suggest alternating between the L1 and L2 texts while listening to the L2 is so you can match what you hear to what you read. But if you can already read the L2 well, then you don't need the L1, and could just read the L2 while listening to the L2. That way, you can pick up (by reading) anything you miss in the audio.


I agree with you.

If we can read in the target language, maybe it's better listening and reading L2 at the beginning and listen L2 without reading afterwards. I am not sure if it's worth to listen L2 and read L1 if we can read the target language with more than 80 percent understanding.

And speed up every time the L2 recording is useful because you increase the exposure: more words (audio or text) by minute. More comprehensible input by minute.

And you are training yourself to understand very fast audio. Last time my audio goes quickly than average native speakers.









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