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Listening-Reading system

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies (Topic Closed Topic Closed) Post Reply
489 messages over 62 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 56 ... 61 62 Next >>
vanityx3
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4570 days ago

331 posts - 326 votes 
1 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Japanese

 
 Message 441 of 489
02 February 2008 at 9:40pm | IP Logged 
reineke wrote:
The thread is 8 months old and 55 pages long. Has anyone other than the topic starter actually learned a language following this method?


I've used it to learn more French than I already did. It seems to work, I've only done it for a week, and I can understand many things now I wouldn't have only a week ago.
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Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
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Speaks: Russian*, English, FinnishC1, Latin, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
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 Message 442 of 489
03 February 2008 at 1:16am | IP Logged 
atamagaii wrote:

To Serpent:
You might be a not fast enough reader. For L-R to be effective you must be able to read pretty quickly, it should be natural like breathing.
Well, I indeed don't normally read quickly, but when I listened and read The Da Vinci Code in Finnish (with both the audio and text in L2) I could do it easily and in fact that's what, I believe, helped me to stop translating everything - the audio was just too fast for that! I think the problem has to do with not being able to listen to an unfamiliar language for a long time :/
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jeff_lindqvist
Diglot
Moderator
SwedenRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 5018 days ago

4250 posts - 5710 votes 
Speaks: Swedish*, English
Studies: German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, Mandarin, Esperanto, Irish, French
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 443 of 489
03 February 2008 at 7:08am | IP Logged 
To me it is quite the opposite. I read a page in one minute (more or less), and I have yet to hear a narrator reading aloud at that speed. So for me, it is more a problem of slowing down my reading (even after just a few minutes of reading I'm several pages ahead of the audio).
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Asiafeverr
Diglot
Senior Member
Hong Kong
Joined 4451 days ago

346 posts - 431 votes 
1 sounds
Speaks: French*, English
Studies: Mandarin, Cantonese, Shanghainese, German

 
 Message 444 of 489
03 February 2008 at 7:46am | IP Logged 
jeff_lindqvist wrote:
To me it is quite the opposite. I read a page in one minute (more or less), and I have yet to hear a narrator reading aloud at that speed. So for me, it is more a problem of slowing down my reading (even after just a few minutes of reading I'm several pages ahead of the audio).


There are many softwares that can speed up and/or slow down the speech speed of a recording. You can speed up the tempo with Audacity and it won't change the voice.

Edited by Asiafeverr on 03 February 2008 at 9:05am

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slucido
Bilingual Diglot
Senior Member
Spain
https://goo.gl/126Yv
Joined 4784 days ago

1296 posts - 1781 votes 
4 sounds
Speaks: Spanish*, Catalan*
Studies: English

 
 Message 445 of 489
03 February 2008 at 9:32am | IP Logged 
Asiafeverr wrote:
jeff_lindqvist wrote:
To me it is quite the opposite. I read a page in one minute (more or less), and I have yet to hear a narrator reading aloud at that speed. So for me, it is more a problem of slowing down my reading (even after just a few minutes of reading I'm several pages ahead of the audio).


There are many softwares that can speed up and/or slow down the speech speed of a recording. You can speed up the tempo with Audacity and it won't change the voice.


I systematically do the same. The first time I listen an audiobook I use the normal speed, but if I listen again, I use Audacity to speed up the audio. In fact is more exposition per hour.
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atamagaii
Senior Member
Anguilla
Joined 4315 days ago

181 posts - 195 votes 
Speaks: Apache*

 
 Message 446 of 489
04 February 2008 at 5:52am | IP Logged 
There are two kinds of pronunciation mistakes:
1. phonematic – affecting the meaning, eg. sh i t instead of sheet
2. simply phonetic, sounding foreign but not affecting the meaning, eg. pussy with "p" without aspiration

The first kind is to be avoided at all costs.

Is good pronunciation important at all?
It affects your listening skills, your speaking skills, your spelling and your reading. It affects your motivation and psychological well-being. It's ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL.

Is good pronunciation difficult to achieve?
NO. If you get down to it properly.

1. Do not speak, do not write, (and do not read without listening) until you've reached the stage of natural listening
2. practise some phonetic listening
3. repeat after the acto(r) only when you fully understand what is being said and you hear the sounds, tones, rythm etc properly
4. avoid NEGATIVE exposure: non-native speakers and fellow students (garbage in, garbage out)
5. do not "charge" at difficult sounds, words etc, do not try to repeat them at all costs, concentrate on what is positive: easy and pleasant.
6. do not blind-shadow (see 5.)

It usually takes about 30 to 40 hours of active phonetic study to be able to repeat absolutely correctly simple phrases and short sentences.

I coached home schooled children and teenagers for twenty years (hundreds of them, in a dozen foreign languages) learning entirely on their own. I was a source of learning materials and some occasional advice. The above was almost always true.


ERRRRORS
1. learning - avoid them
2. using (communication) - do not be afraid of them

Edited by atamagaii on 04 February 2008 at 6:12am

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slucido
Bilingual Diglot
Senior Member
Spain
https://goo.gl/126Yv
Joined 4784 days ago

1296 posts - 1781 votes 
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Studies: English

 
 Message 447 of 489
04 February 2008 at 8:44am | IP Logged 
atamagaii wrote:

1. Do not speak, do not write, (and do not read without listening) until you've reached the stage of natural listening


What do you recommend to people with near native reading skills, but basic listening skills? How can you adapt your method to them, so that they become near native listening too?
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