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Georgian Notes, Doubts and Tips TAC 2013

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TixhiiDon
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 4099 days ago

772 posts - 1473 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese, German, Russian
Studies: Georgian

 
 Message 25 of 758
25 January 2012 at 10:09pm | IP Logged 
I really really strongly advise you to put down Hewitt and pick up Kiziria. You'll be
amazed at the difference. The former does not know how to teach Georgian, the latter
does. It's that simple!
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
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3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 26 of 758
25 January 2012 at 11:27pm | IP Logged 
The problem is I've tried Kiziria before, and got annoyed with the little/not enough grammar. It's grammar + idioms that actually motivates me the most when learning a language. Isolated vocabulary is just for filling in. That's why I'd like to work on it after finishing Hewitt.

Well, first time I tried it I had no support from natives or experienced learners! Maybe this time it would be different. Still, I could do Tschenkeli alongside. I did the "exercises for the first chapter" (despite the name, they work as different parts of the book) and learned a lot from simply translating into German, even though source language is German! Doing so was the closest to having an A**imil method.
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TixhiiDon
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 4099 days ago

772 posts - 1473 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese, German, Russian
Studies: Georgian

 
 Message 27 of 758
26 January 2012 at 1:35am | IP Logged 
If you are OK with German, another textbook, Lehrbuch der georgischen Sprache by Lia
Abuladze and Andreas Ludden, is really good (I'm sure you've heard of it). It has quite
an unusual way of laying out the grammar but I found it very interesting once I got used
to it. In fact I might actually go back to it for some review.....
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zecchino1991
Senior Member
United States
facebook.com/amyybur
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778 posts - 885 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Italian, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Arabic (Written), Romanian, Icelandic, Georgian

 
 Message 28 of 758
26 January 2012 at 1:36am | IP Logged 
Maybe do what I did, and use Kiziria and Aronson at the same time (or Hewitt, if you prefer)? I found that
many of the grammar gaps in Kiziria's book were filled by Aronson. I don't have Hewitt though so I can't
comment on that, but I assume it would work, too.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 29 of 758
26 January 2012 at 3:30am | IP Logged 
Thank you all!

I'm not entirely ok with German, for example, as for reading grammar explanations. But when it's just about translating dialogues and sentences, I can do it.

I've heard about that Lehrbuch, Tixhiidon, but I don't have access to it. I've done second lesson on Aronson but got overwhelmed by the amount of vocabulary and exercises. Maybe nowadays I'd feel more comfortable. Still, I'd like a textbook with dialogues. Let's see - I'm gonna try Hewitt tomorrow again, and if it doesn't work, I may redo Kiziria (I think I went up to the 8th lesson then I just read the missing lessons). I still like Hewitt's structure better and I can benefit from not being my "definite" learning and thus becomee less worried, it's just a pity that dialogues don't get translated and I have to type word by word again at the online translators if I want to figure out something. It's not that I'm waiting for the "perfect" method, I think that amount of changes is normal since Georgian is a less commonly taught language and people still haven't figured out the best ways to teach its concepts. I'm making daily progresses and having important discussions, and that's what matters!
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 30 of 758
26 January 2012 at 6:59pm | IP Logged 
9th lesson at book2, no big deal. Learned the word for only, მხოლოთ. Is this the most usual one?

I've restarted with Kiziria. I don't plan to spend much time on it, due to the lack of depth on grammar. I want to learn vocabulary, verb tenses and then move on to other books. Since they'll be mostly grammar books, I'll then need another book for learning more conversation, and that'd be either Hewitt again or a Russian one from which I'd take only the dialogues.

Lesson 01 for Kiziria was easy, no big deal either. It does make difference to have grammar translated. I'm familiar with most of the vocabulary on lesson 01 now, so it was more rewarding than at the first time.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 31 of 758
27 January 2012 at 7:53pm | IP Logged 
On book2: this lesson about yesterday and tomorrow was very useful.

მე სახლში დავრჩები. I'm staying at home.
Which verb is დავრჩები and what is it original meaning?

ხვალ ისევ ვმუშაობ. - Tomorrow I'm working again.
I guess they're using present tense here, with only ხვალ accounting for the future?


Kiziria's lesson 02:

One question: does Georgian make liaisons or is it like German, adding glotal stops?

At the sentence ის არ არის ტურისტი, does it sound like "isararis"?

I don't get what სიამოვნებით means and how it is formed.
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Murdoc
Triglot
Senior Member
Georgia
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113 posts - 208 votes 
Speaks: Georgian*, English, Russian

 
 Message 32 of 758
30 January 2012 at 12:44pm | IP Logged 
Quote:
დავრჩები


დარჩენა - to stay
დავრჩები - I will stay
ვრჩები - I'm staying

therefore, although the meaning is similar, technically the translation is wrong.
Quote:
მე სახლში დავრჩები. I'm staying at home.


მე სახლში დავრჩები - I will stay at home
მე სახლში ვრჩები - I'm staying at home

Quote:
ხვალ ისევ ვმუშაობ. - Tomorrow I'm working again.
I guess they're using present tense here, with only ხვალ accounting for the future?


Yeah it's formed in same way as its English translation.

Quote:
does Georgian make liaisons or is it like German, adding glotal stops?


I'm not familiar with these terms unfortunately, but if your question is about whether "ის არ არის" is pronounced straightforward without any stop between the words, then the answer is yes. But I think it doesn't sound exactly like "isararis" either, as if it was one word. There is some difference between the stresses, with a little stress at the beginning of each word. Once again, this is entirely my opinion based on native fluency without any background of linguistic knowledge.

Quote:
სიამოვნებით


სიამოვნება - n. pleasure
სიამოვნებ-ით - with pleasure





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