Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Tarvos - TAC 2015 Pushkin/Scan

 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
1511 messages over 189 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 166 ... 188 189 Next >>
tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2816 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1321 of 1511
05 January 2015 at 1:54pm | IP Logged 
Vinferie og ekstrem kunst

A lot of Svorsk in there, but I managed in Norwegian. It's about how you resolve two
thoughts that seem to be radically opposed in your head, and about how a TV series
episode I saw mentioned it. It is funny.

It's in Norwegian Bokmal btw

@Sooniye: Tack för kommentaren :) Always very pleased to hear people read my things

Edited by tarvos on 05 January 2015 at 1:57pm

1 person has voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2816 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1322 of 1511
08 January 2015 at 10:46pm | IP Logged 
Jesuischarlie

Few things piss me off more than islamic extremists blowing people up. Don't read if you
don't like reading my hatred. It's in French. Fitting.
5 persons have voted this message useful



tastyonions
Triglot
Senior Member
United States
goo.gl/UIdChYRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 2774 days ago

1044 posts - 1823 votes 
Speaks: English*, French, Spanish
Studies: Italian

 
 Message 1323 of 1511
09 January 2015 at 6:51am | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:
Jesuischarlie

Few things piss me off more than islamic extremists blowing people up. Don't read if you don't like reading my hatred. It's in French. Fitting.

Tu as parfaitement raison. C'est à ceux qui se sentent tellement offensés par des simples dessins d'apprendre à, comme on dit en anglais, "get over it!" On ne cède rien aux lâches qui détruiraient la liberté d'expression et les pays qui la revendiquent.

Edited by tastyonions on 09 January 2015 at 7:16am

1 person has voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2816 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1324 of 1511
09 January 2015 at 9:58am | IP Logged 
Merci tastyonions!

D'ailleurs j'ai corrigé quelques fautes grammaticales, qui apparaissaient à cause de ma
monologue interne...
1 person has voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2816 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1325 of 1511
11 January 2015 at 11:08pm | IP Logged 
Как заполнить визовую анкету Китая

On how to fill out a visa application form for China, all in Russian!
2 persons have voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2816 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1326 of 1511
13 January 2015 at 9:00pm | IP Logged 
A Russian Retrospective: 3,5 Years of Study
A critical reflection using the engineering mentality

Some 3,5 years ago I started learning Russian (3 years since I started this log). It's
time for a look back at certain choices I have made during this process, and what I
think about these choices. Certain choices were beneficial; certain choices were not.
This blog entry is a retrospective analysis of my choices.

We're going back to the fall of 2011, when I started my Russian journey, and signed up
for an evening class in the Hague. This is the second step in my road to polyglottery
(the first was laid in Brussels). This is the moment where I decided to learn a
foreign language that I had no connection to, no personal feelings for and no
knowledge about. I literally did not know a single Russian personally and I hadn't
even ever heard a word of it spoken. I went in blind, a complete beginner, and started
where everyone starts when they're not autodidacts: by taking a class.

Moment 1: Classroom Education

And that did not actually turn out as bad as I thought it would be. At that point, I
had no idea what the culture and the people were like. I really got to ease myself
into learning the language and build up confidence by showing I could do things the
traditional way. At a certain point, however, I found myself doing the same thing I
did in my school days, and that was move ahead. I did get frustrated with the lack of
pace after a few months. Some might have given up. Some might have said classroom
education is not for me. I'm bored.

But I had a problem. The problem: I was going too fast for most people. I could handle
more than they could at that point in time (this was often a feature of my language
classes at school, where I was always leaps and bounds ahead of other students when it
came to foreign languages - I don't know why that was. It may have had to do with the
fact that I already had one squarely under my belt. It may have had to do with good
memory. I don't know.)

Problems need solutions, and I decided not to drop out, but to finish my course and
add my own skills on top. I would be miles ahead at the end, but I could always move
up a few levels or take a test and see how far I got. In the end, I decided to stop
Russian formal education and moved on to French (eventually the same thing happened
and I haven't taken any formal language education in the classroom style since. I've
used tutoring, but that's personal and a different ballgame).

And it worked. I got my Teach Yourself Russian and I worked through it on my own, and
I got farther and farther ahead. Then I found this forum. But the key is: engineering
mentality. I had a problem (group classes set a pace that is too slow) and I solved it
(become my own boss and set a faster pace I'm comfortable with). It had results.

Moment 2: The Decision To Find Penpals

I credit this as the main thing I have done in my Russian learning and I will tell you
why. I loved the grammar learning and reading about the Russian language and culture
but I had no reality. I had to find friends, to meet people, to do things. I needed a
bond with the people. I decided to find penpals and literally the first person I ever
talked to in Russian on InterPals would later become the person that picked me up
after a 50-hour train journey in Tomsk. One of the first few would be the one that
lodged me. Several people have become my friends through the internet and in real life
and Russian has become the main social language I use apart from English and Dutch (I
speak it more often than French). Again, it shows a trend: if you have a problem (no
personal connection), you need to solve it (find a personal connection with people).
The amount of people I have exchanged messages with in Russian numbers in the tens,
maybe the hundreds! I am sure that it's more than 50! Not all of those have been
regular, but for regular people we're looking at 5-10 anyways. Over a longer period of
time is definitely 10+.

And keep in mind, I used to sit behind my computer with my dictionary trying to decode
messages. I would not understand half a sentence (sometimes not the grammar, but
usually also vocabulary) and I would use google translate to figure it out.

And also keep in mind I might have searched for people locally. But I'm not the most
outgoing person, so the internet thing was ideal and it worked. 70% of my Russian has
been learned this way and it's my motivation to keep going.

Moment 3: Ditching Grammar

There's no getting round the fact that Russian cases and verbs can be a nightmare but
at a certain point you need to ditch the textbooks and grammar approach. Especially in
my first year, I spent a lot of time with the grammar and revising rules. In effect
this was a great thing to do because I can dream the tables in my sleep and I also
know why they are used. But grammar is not enough. I did have some vocabulary and
context, but it wasn't enough - I needed more context. That was the point that I
decided "enough is enough" and I put aside the grammar books. I recently bought a
gigantic grammar in Dutch, but it's to check all the small details now that I can
safely deal with most of the important aspects in Russian. Grammar is necessary, and
in Russian you do have to put effort into this - but it's not the be all and end all.
And for f**ks sake don't start with it! Vocabulary first.


Moment 4: Pronunciation

One thing I didn't do instantly but realised on time is that pronunciation is key, and
I had a problem: I couldn't roll my rs. At all. I had tried when learning a bit of
Romanian for a girlfriend and I couldn't and had been made fun of. So a few months in
and my r still sounded like a Jewish Russian speaker. I had to change that. Eventually
I asked my mother (who can roll her 's and is a speech therapist) how you did it, and
because I work as a postman, I had loads of free walks to practice rolling my r. So I
used to go around town merrily saying "krentenbrood" to myself 500000 times until I
got the sound right. It took me two months, but after that I could pronounce it
properly. And I still can't pronounce the r properly in маршрутка. I paid less
attention to soft/hard consonants, but eventually I worked around that problem too. My
Russian is much better now that I have given the pronunciation the time it deserves.
Lesson learned: pronunciation is important. I have done pronunciation first in every
language I have actively studied ever since, and I've also cleaned up my French.

Moment 5: Reading

This is the last decision, and it's been the one I've put off the longest - read more
in Russian. At a certain point I could talk fine, I could function, and I understood
what people were talking about when they spoke to me - but I couldn't read or
understand complex things. This happened a few months ago and I've worked on my
reading and listening since - and my vocabulary has improved immensely. That was the
last real step I needed to become a confident and fluent speaker. All I had to do was
find the right material to read and listen to. It took a while to understand that at
higher levels reading, not speaking, is the crucial skill.

I hope you find this post informative and that it inspires future learners of Russian
on team Pushkin.

Edited by tarvos on 14 January 2015 at 8:06pm

10 persons have voted this message useful



Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
Joined 4706 days ago

9753 posts - 15775 votes 
4 sounds
Speaks: Russian*, English, FinnishC1, Latin, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Danish, Romanian, Polish, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Slovenian, Catalan, Czech, Galician, Dutch, Swedish

 
 Message 1327 of 1511
14 January 2015 at 2:50am | IP Logged 
It inspires even me :P
1 person has voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2816 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1328 of 1511
14 January 2015 at 10:19am | IP Logged 
Well, I think the idea of "speak from day 1" is subservient to the idea that you need
to solve your most immediate problems first. I speak sooner because it does two
things: 1) it allows me to get out of the books and therefore feel like I am a human
being in contact with other human beings, which for me is the key motivation to
improve at the beginning and 2) if you don't know the alphabet/writing system or even
if you simply have little vocabulary a fat lot of good reading is going to do you.
You're not going to understand, so you're better off improving listening and speaking
first. By training other skills a bit first you can lift a few pieces of the veil,
which makes reading (especially extensive reading) much more enjoyable. I find
intensive reading a very annoying process, and that's pretty much the point of
textbooks for me.

In essence it's all about concretizing abstract notions into approaches that translate
to the real world. I do use theories but more in the sense that I use a theory that
fits practice - I don't practice to fit theory. This has a downside - I can be sloppy,
especially in the beginning, but that is not something that bothers me. Programmers
put out programs when they work at a certain release date - you can always patch and
bugfix later. That's how I approach languages as well.



Edited by tarvos on 14 January 2015 at 10:56am



3 persons have voted this message useful



This discussion contains 1511 messages over 189 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.4844 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2019 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.