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Tarvos - TAC 2015 Pushkin/Scan

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tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
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Joined 2869 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 641 of 1511
17 April 2013 at 4:39pm | IP Logged 
My book denotes that pronunciation but says a lot of people pronounce the shva as an /a/
regardless even though your pronunciation is the prescribed one.

My book uses the Hebrew terminology, I'm just too lazy to type everything in Hebrew at
this moment because I haven't internalised the keyboard yet.
1 person has voted this message useful



zecchino1991
Senior Member
United States
facebook.com/amyybur
Joined 3420 days ago

778 posts - 885 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Italian, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Arabic (Written), Romanian, Icelandic, Georgian

 
 Message 642 of 1511
17 April 2013 at 4:47pm | IP Logged 
Thank you Golan! I didn't realize that. Although I think your book is right Tarvos, because to me it sounds an
awful lot like "katavtem"...But then again I often have trouble telling the difference between unstressed /a/ and
/e/ in Hebrew. They sound quite similar sometimes.

Edited by zecchino1991 on 17 April 2013 at 4:48pm

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Golan
Bilingual Triglot
Newbie
Israel
Joined 2415 days ago

11 posts - 19 votes
Speaks: Modern Hebrew*, Biblical Hebrew*, English
Studies: Tigrinya

 
 Message 643 of 1511
17 April 2013 at 4:51pm | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:
My book denotes that pronunciation but says a lot of people pronounce
the
shva as an /a/
regardless even though your pronunciation is the prescribed one.

My book uses the Hebrew terminology, I'm just too lazy to type everything in Hebrew at
this moment because I haven't internalised the keyboard yet.


Unfortunately so. If you happen to hear the right pronunciation, good chances are that
the speaker is/was a school teacher (or a teacher's son, like me).

And about the d/t combination, it is the case with any Shoresh which ends with Dalet.
For example:

Avadeti (אבדתי) - I got lost.
Bagadeti (בגדתי) - I cheated/betrayed.

Edited by Golan on 17 April 2013 at 5:01pm

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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3328 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 644 of 1511
17 April 2013 at 6:09pm | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:
- start colloquial Icelandic (in my possession)
- start FSI Serbo-Croatian (in my possession)
- start FSI Swahili (in my possession)
- start another language entirely; Malagasy (very attractive right now), Portuguese,
Chinese, Tagalog, and Czech also all beckon.


I think I would go for a non-related language. Malagasy has the advantage of having an Assimil. Swahili has this, FSI and much more.

I think BCS is ok if you are comfortable with Russian, though there are more interesting books that teach only Croatian, like Hippocrene's or Living Language Spoken World. Tagalog is said to have a confusing grammar and you're already picking Hebrew on different grammar concepts. Czech is easier to tell apart from Russian than BCS, at least to my eyes.
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tarvos
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Winner TAC 2012
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China
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Joined 2869 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 645 of 1511
17 April 2013 at 6:34pm | IP Logged 
Icelandic is also an option. Anyway I usually go with my gut feeling. And interference
doesn't bother me. My Russian suffices.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3328 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 646 of 1511
17 April 2013 at 10:30pm | IP Logged 
tarvos, just like Emme, I'm still impressed how fast you go. When you have a textbook you like and you have time, do you do as many lessons as you feel like? I always stop at the previously programmed number, be it one or two, also because I need to leave room for other assignments, other languages. There are some textbooks I wish I could finish quickier, though, like, if I decide to take Spanish or German again I'd like to finish their beginner's Assimils rather quickly in order to proceed to the intermediate ones.
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tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2869 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 647 of 1511
17 April 2013 at 11:06pm | IP Logged 
Nah, I usually do a couple or so lessons a week. The trick is that I have quite a
steady weekly rhythm and can usually get in substantial amounts on Sundays, Tuesday
evenings, and I have almost four hours to kill every Wednesday on a commute. I do
little tidbits here and there on short bus/metro commutes or at home. I also don't do
very many actual textbooks. If you have four hours to kill it's not a big deal to do 2
lessons of Hebrew and 2 of Romanian and enter the new vocabulary into Anki. Breton
lessons are only active wave now so I kinda do one or two at a time whenever, but
eventually I manage something like 3-4 lessons of each a week and it all adds up fairly
quickly. If I am to focus on one language then it ends up being one a day usually. I
drop tempo if I have to do both active/passive wave Assimil at the same time, which is
why I try to have one language in the "active wave only phase" and one in the "passive
only phase". It takes serious loads of time otherwise.

I also don't spend much time on my better languages (French, German, lately also
Swedish) because I flat out don't need to use a textbook; I just read books or watch
youtube vids or whatever. And I have an internet social life that is partly in Russian
so I get consistent, almost daily practice in Russian. Once I can pick up a book and
read it, I know I need to just finish off the last full textbook I've started (but I
never buy many to start with).

Actually, I have sort of developed a system for how this works:

Introductory Phase

1. Assess how close the language I am attempting to learn is to my base languages
2. Assess amount of resources.

This is important because it determines how much I can get bonused by cognates. For
example, one Romanian textbook (Assimil) is MORE than enough. I don't really need more.
I can guess almost all the complicated vocabulary because I speak English and French. I
know this because I did my homework and read up on the pronunciation, grammar hurdles
and such that I need to overcome. If it is going to consist of a lot of familiar
elements, then learning to speak/read/write fast is not a problem. So I know that after
le Roumain, I should be able to communicate, more or less. I will not speak perfect
Romanian, but I can read and keep on going and I can talk. I can actually already more
or less hold a conversation in Romanian when written because I know four important
tenses and have enough background to guess most vocabulary that I don't know. Not
everything, but much, I can do. (Whether I can pull off the same trick in speech is
anybody's guess, but my experience from Swedish tells me that a few months adapting to
speaking is enough if you come from a solid grammatical base and have tried writing it;
it's a matter of sound adaptation).

Step two is Get a Base:

This is where I do the slog, learn the basic vocab and grammar and make sure I have the
fundament built. This takes shorter or longer depending on what I'm dealing with. It
took a lot longer for Russian and it took very little time for Swedish.

Once you have a base and completed the one/two/three textbooks, you move on and use
other ways. Too many textbooks are boring. One or two suffice for the grammar, should I
need to consult them on a more intricate point then I buy a grammar to that end and a
dictionary.

Then you are at step 3 and it is "do what you would always do, but now in language X".
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tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2869 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 648 of 1511
20 April 2013 at 4:11pm | IP Logged 
I have not done exorbitantly much with my languages, except that I've now hit lesson 80
of the Breton active wave (ever closer to my goal, yay), completed the Hebrew review
exercises and done some Anki Romanian revision. I hope to complete unit 34 (I've read
through the text, but I need to do the audio and the exercises and add the new vocab to
Anki) and maybe some more Breton and then I'll be done for today. I will not have much
time tomorrow (compensated by having some on Monday maybe?) in which case it means that
I will be able to surf through some more Breton. I have already achieved my Hebrew
goals for this month and am close to achieving my Romanian ones; I will be tempted to
move ahead a bit just to maintain a steady rhythm in both (in particular Hebrew) but
this will open up some space to deal with Breton and get that active wave out of the
way soon.

It might also open up one or two timeslots to deal with something other than these
three.

Furthermore I've spent a lot of time just doing stuff in Russian (watch an episode of
Запретная зона, chat about politics, I had another iTalki class last Thursday) which
means that that language is undergoing continuous maintenance and improvement.


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