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Tarvos - TAC 2015 Pushkin/Scan

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tarvos
Super Polyglot
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China
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Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1089 of 1511
26 January 2014 at 12:04am | IP Logged 
Something else I noticed today - why do Swedish singers roll their r so much more
strongly when they are singing? I was listening to Sofia Karlsson live earlier, but then
I noticed Lisa Ekdahl doing the exact same.

Det frrrrrrryser nu sakta till is.

Anyone out there who can explain this to me?
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tarvos
Super Polyglot
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likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2812 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1090 of 1511
26 January 2014 at 6:35pm | IP Logged 
Azi am citit anumite articole în română (asta a fost temă pentru mine), și am găsit
niște articole științifice și le am rezumat aici. Puteți vedea rezultate de mai jos:

http://www.descopera.ro/dnews/11966282-stephen-hawking-soche aza-lumea-fizicienilor-
nu-exista-gauri-negre-poate-gauri-gri

În acest articol, Stephen Hawking spune că teoria asupra găuri negri trebuie să fie
schimbată – după părerea lui, nu există găuri negri, dar numai găuri gri. Acest
schimbul teorii a fost necesitat pentru a rezolva un dezbat fierbinte a fizicienilor,
și soluția lui Hawking a fost de-a regândi conceptul găurilor. Totuși, nu toți
științifici cred că Hawking a dreptate, și rămân sceptici.

http://www.descopera.ro/dnews/11953495-cine-are-mai-multe-pr obleme-de-memorie-
barbatul-sau-femeia

Cercetători norvegieni au descoperit că bărbați au mai multe probleme de memorie decât
femeie, când se intră la vârsta 30 până 60 de ani. La femeie se întâmplă la fel anume
de probleme, dar într-o măsura mai mică. O explicație apropiată nu s-a găsit – doar că
o memorie mai bună este asociată cu o educație mai ridicată, și că oamenii cu
anxietatea și depresia uit mai mult, dar observația asta este validă pentru ambele
sexe.

Edited by tarvos on 26 January 2014 at 9:36pm

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tarvos
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Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1091 of 1511
27 January 2014 at 5:11pm | IP Logged 
RO: Acum, din cauză lipsea a învățătoarei, nu am avut lecția astăzi, dar va fi
reprogramat cândva în aceia săptămâna - nu știu exact. Dar m-am pregătit oricum, și
dacă va fi mâine sau vineri, nu mă fac griji - totul este bine cu româna și mă simt bun
când vorbesc.

I have also read Korean today, particularly in my reader, but since my Korean is very
limited, I'll just keep it at a few words in Korean here:

KO: 오늘 한국어 읽었어요, 그리고 예전보다 더 쉬웠어요.

For anyone who didn't get that - I read the last part of my reader, and it was easier
than I expected. I still need a glossary and a lot of patience to struggle through a
Korean text, and I need the translation at the back badly, but I get some basic
structures and given I have bilingual information, I can, if I read intensively,
Iversen-style, make some sense of a Korean text. The text also explains some unknown
grammar points, which is useful (because I hadn't seen any except for one) and contains
a glossary at hand - however, some words you are apparently expected to know already
(and I don't), so those I have to look up myself in the dictionary (or correlate
through the translation at the back, but it's quite free). However eventually I got
through my first text, although I am going to forget words like "peninsula" anyway (I
don't know how to say that in Russian or Romanian either, although in the latter I'd
probably recognise the word) (I checked - it's the same in Romanian and it's "half-
island" in Russian - not immediately obvious, but I could conjecture that it meant
"peninsula" in context if we were talking about the location of Murmansk or something).

HE:

בסוף, גם למדתי עברית. זה יותר קל עחשיו. אני סמח שאני יכול לקרוא יותר מהר, ובעטיד אקרא
הרי פוטר. אני מדנר יותר, מבין יותר טוב... בעברית, הכל בסדר!

I've also studied two lessons of Assimil, and am finally noticing minor improvements in
my Hebrew, particularly in understanding. I still lack a lot of vocabulary, but we're
getting there with the basics.   



Edited by tarvos on 28 January 2014 at 2:57pm

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Warp3
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 Message 1092 of 1511
28 January 2014 at 3:05am | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:
KO: 오늘 한국어 읽었어요, 그리고 전에 보다 더 쉬웠어요.

For anyone who didn't get that - I read the last part of my reader, and it was easier
than I expected.


A common way to say "than expected, than (I) thought" in Korean is 생각보다 (생각 =
thought(s), thinking).

Quote:
although I am going to forget words like "peninsula" anyway (I
don't know how to say that in Russian or Romanian either, although in the latter I'd
probably recognise the word) (I checked - it's the same in Romanian and it's "half-
island" in Russian - not immediately obvious, but I could conjecture that it meant
"peninsula" in context if we were talking about the location of Murmansk or something).


Two things:

1) Peninsula is somewhat of a more useful word than normal in Korean, because Korea
*is* a peninsula. In fact, if you prefix peninsula with 한(韓)~ (the same 한 from 한국)
that makes the word 한반도 (the Korean peninsula).

2) Peninsula is actually "half-island" in Korean as well. 반(半) = half; 도(島) = island.
Some other examples of those roots to help the word stick: 반바지 = shorts (lit: half-
pants); 반말 = low speech form (lit: half-speech); for the 도 root, just think of place names
for Korean islands, the most common example being 제주도 (Jeju Island).
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renaissancemedi
Bilingual Triglot
Senior Member
Greece
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941 posts - 1308 votes 
Speaks: Greek*, Ancient Greek*, EnglishC2
Studies: French, Russian, Turkish, Modern Hebrew

 
 Message 1093 of 1511
28 January 2014 at 8:01am | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:


HE:

בסוף, גם למדתי עברית. זה יותר קל עחשיו. אני סמח שאני יכול לקרוא יותר מהר, ובעטיד אקרא
הרי פוטר. אני מדנר יותר, מבין יותר טוב... בעברית, הכל בסדר!

I've also studied two lessons of Assimil, and am finally noticing minor improvements in
my Hebrew, particularly in understanding. I still lack a lot of vocabulary, but we're
getting there with the basics.   



Great. I know what you mean by focusing on vocabulary. I understood that if you know the word you don't need niqqud, you jst rd txts by fcksng on the cnsnts, and frankly maybe this sort of thing isn't so bad after all. You don't make the usual vowel related spelling mistakes. :)
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tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
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likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2812 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
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Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1094 of 1511
28 January 2014 at 11:22am | IP Logged 
Warp3 wrote:
tarvos wrote:
KO: 오늘 한국어 읽었어요, 그리고 전에 보다 더 쉬웠어요.

For anyone who didn't get that - I read the last part of my reader, and it was easier
than I expected.


A common way to say "than expected, than (I) thought" in Korean is 생각보다 (생각 =
thought(s), thinking).



I actually tried to write "than before" - is there a better way to do that than the way
I did (now that I think of it, I don't think I need the location particle)

Quote:

Two things:

1) Peninsula is somewhat of a more useful word than normal in Korean, because Korea
*is* a peninsula. In fact, if you prefix peninsula with 한(韓)~ (the same 한 from 한국)
that makes the word 한반도 (the Korean peninsula).

2) Peninsula is actually "half-island" in Korean as well. 반(半) = half; 도(島) =
island.
Some other examples of those roots to help the word stick: 반바지 = shorts (lit: half-
pants); 반말 = low speech form (lit: half-speech); for the 도 root, just think of place
names
for Korean islands, the most common example being 제주도 (Jeju Island).


That is true, and it came up in a story about the Tangun myth, which describes the
founding principle of Korea. I didn't know those roots, but thanks for the heads up. By
the way, you seem to add the Hanja - are these important to know? I have no experience
with Chinese (yet) and I think that Chinese is something on a distant horizon right now
- maybe in 2015 or 2016 I will start it. (It's in the line of fire behind my current
projects Korean, Hebrew and Icelandic, of which the latter I will get back to in the
second half).

@Renaissancemedi - thanks. Hebrew is logical if you know the roots and the prefixes.
However I still need practice reading actual texts, so that is the next step while I
continue to take tutoring to work on my speaking.

Romanian is the other language I am working on improving quite intensely, along with
French, but in those languages the focus is on becoming erudite, and eliminating small
errors, not the "I am not trying to sound like a baby babbling" stage.
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Evita
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Latvia
learnlatvian.info
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734 posts - 1036 votes 
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Studies: Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 1095 of 1511
28 January 2014 at 2:25pm | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:
I actually tried to write "than before" - is there a better way to do that than the way I did (now that I think of it, I don't think I need the location particle)


I think "예전보다" is what you're looking for, I just googled it and got 122 mil. results. Be sure to not leave a space before 보다.

Quote:
That is true, and it came up in a story about the Tangun myth, which describes the founding principle of Korea. I didn't know those roots, but thanks for the heads up. By the way, you seem to add the Hanja - are these important to know? I have no experience with Chinese (yet) and I think that Chinese is something on a distant horizon right now - maybe in 2015 or 2016 I will start it.


The Chinese-Korean characters are definitely not important to know, especially for a beginner. It is, however, very useful to know whether a word is of a Chinese origin and if yes then note its syllable (or syllables) and look out for them in words with similar meaning. You know, like in those TTMIK Word Builder lessons. For example, I don't know the hanja for '학' but I know it is related to studying. Of course, other hanjas may hide behind the same pronunciation so you can't always assume that it's the same meaning but it's still helpful.

Having said that, it is definitely not useless to study hanja. Warp3 will probably tell you that the Chinese characters appear on variety TV sometimes (or quite often) and they are used in street signs and advertisements and other assorted places, not to mention all the old written texts before Hangeul became widespread. I myself intend to start studying Hanja seriously this year but I suggest you don't worry about it yet. Korean children have to learn 1800 characters at school but I've heard many of them forget many of them since they're not widely used anymore. On the other hand, knowing Hanja does help when learning the Sino-Korean vocabulary so in this sense it's more useful for us than for Koreans. But as I said, don't worry about it yet, you'll have plenty of time to start learning it later if you decide to go for it. And I may be wrong here but I think you put the most emphasis on speaking and communicating with people so Hanja will probably not be high on your list. Oh, and just in case you didn't know, Hanja is mostly based on the traditional Chinese characters, not the simplified ones so... Learning the traditional ones may not be as useful for your Chinese as you may think.
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tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2812 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 1096 of 1511
28 January 2014 at 3:02pm | IP Logged 
@Evita: Paldies.

Now back to my Hebrew studies.


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