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Iversen’s Multiconfused Log (see p.1!)

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Iversen
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 Message 1465 of 3959
04 November 2009 at 7:54pm | IP Logged 
No, in this case it is just a simple misspelling.

... then it will be like that ----> Danish: bliver det sådan
... higher than me ---> Danish: højere end mig


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Iversen
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 Message 1466 of 3959
05 November 2009 at 1:30am | IP Logged 
AF: Ek het geruime tyd nie geskrywe enigiets in afrikaans hier nie, so nou ek wou vind 'n geskik tema. ... 't is redelik maklik om te vind iets omtrent toerism en natuur in Suidafrika, nie minste weens die tuisblad van 'n beroemde tydskrif, Weg. Hierdie keer het ek lees 'n artikel omtrent 'n toer to Groot Zimbabwe in het Zimbabwe van Mugabes. Ek het persoonlik net besoek die gebied rondom Victoria Vals na het begin van sy raas teen die ekonomie van Zimbabwe, maar dit gebied kry 'n klomp van vreemde inkomste omdanks die toeristen. Ef ek was op toer in elk ander deel van die land, ek sal vrees nie alleen vir my veiligheid nie, maar ook vir niksbeduidend ding soos hardloop uit petrol en voedsel. Maar die ruinen van Groot Zimbabwe is definitief 'n plek ek sal hou van om te sien, en ek ook hoop om te sien die beroemd nationalparks van die land ... later!

IC: Eg hef Island nýlig heimsótt - öðru landi með efnahagslegum vandamálum. En hér er önnur ástæða: myndigleikunar hlaup leyfa hóp auðugur haga sér eins og þeir átti allan heiminn. Sjálfsbrekkingan sprang, en Íslendingar eru sómakæru og iðrusama, og þeir raða örugglegt af. En hvað er hægt að gera í langa dimma veturnætur á hinu köldu, vindblásinu eyjunni: Já, þú getur grafið niður og spila skák. Miðað við stærð landsins hafa Íslendingarna höfð furðu margir stórmeistaru. Ég hef lesið nokkuð um skák á íslensku Wikipediu. Og skák er alvarlegt mál upp þar: er ekki skákmaður "beat" (ensk.) eða "slået" (dönsk.), heldur drepið!

LAT: "De arte cocinaria" romani Apiciae (III-IV sec.) liber primus de arte cocinaria esse dicitur, etiamsi descriptiones de commissationibus Luculli Satyriconque Petronii habemus, - forsitan etiam informationes de preparationi cibi gentium classicorum ante helluones romanos. Tamen non quaero ut Apicio edere, - de Isiciis omentatis in diario cocinario Fasulyae scripsi.

IT: Ma dopo Apicio altri cuoci e gastronomi hanno scritto libri con questo titolo, incluso Maestro Martino (a cura di Emilio Faccioli.) . Un esempio:

Per cocer capponi, fasani et altri volatili:
Cicerone, over cigno, ocha, anetra, grua, ocha salvatica, airone et cicogna vogliono essere arrosto piene de aglio o cepolle et altre bone chose. Pavoni, fasani, coturnici, starne, galline salvatiche, pedarelli, quaglie, turdi, merule et tutti li altri boni ucelli vogliono esser arrosto.


Eh, "vogliono esser arrosto" ?! Io non credo affatto che gli uccelli menzionati veramente hanno espresso il suo desiderio di esser arrosto dall'egregio maestro.

----

I have not written anything in Afrikaans here for some time, so I had a peek into the homepage of the South African travel magazine Weg. Its focus is mainly on South Africa, btu I also read an article about a trip to Zimbabwe, mostly to see the ruins of Great Zimbabwe, but also some of the national parks. I have in fact visited the Victoria Falls area after Mugabe went berserk, but even in this affluent part of the country the shops only sold canned food and soap, and gasoline and food was something you bought in Botswana or Zambia.. If I was driving around by myself like the South Africans who wrote the article, I would fear not only for my personal safetry, but also to run out of fuel and food.   

Another country with a bad economy is Iceland, though for completely different reasons. The authorities in that country clearly let a bunch of rich men do as they pleased, and when the crisis came their large depts they fell. I have read an article about chess in Iceland, and one the things struck me is that they don't 'beat' the pieces, - they kill'em!

I have mentioned the late Roman cookbook by Apicius in Fasulye's new culinary cookbook (which already has become a very interesting polyglot meting point). His receipts] are commented upon here:

Apicius was the very embodiment of effete prodigality, his cooking school "defiled the age with his teaching." Having squandered a hundred million sesterces and overwhelmed with debt, Apicius was said to have calculated that he had only ten million sesterces left, not nearly enough to satisfy his cravings, and so killed himself in despair... Ultimately, though, after stuffing himself with dainties, it was the gluttony of Apicius that killed his body and soul

Ouch, true Roman dekadence, it seems...

Others chefs have reused the title of his book, such as the Italian 'maestro' Martino, who in the quote from "Libro de arte coquinaria" above seems to claim that all birds including storks, cranes and swans just longed to be roasted in his kitchen. Well, I doubt. The picture of signore Martino himself on a spit over a fire runs through my mind, methinks he might not be happy about that prospect, so why should the birds?


Said Iversen, who is going to eat a slice of some poor hapless animal later today ...


Edited by Iversen on 05 November 2009 at 2:44am

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Hobbema
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 Message 1467 of 3959
05 November 2009 at 5:53am | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:
SP:
Today I have listened to some music by the Spanish violinist and composer Pablo-a-lot-of-names-Sarasate, 1844-1908. It is striking how easy it is to recognize that this is Spanish music (and this is true even though he lived in Paris for most of his life). His most renowned work is Zigeunerweisen op.20, ... including the scintillating Zapateado...

...PS 2: .... and if you want to hear Sarasate's perception of the Basque language, then listen to the abrupt phrasing in his less wellknown Capricho Vasco.


After a very interesting series of posts discussing hundreds of years of music and composers, I have decided I'm going to give Sarasate a listen and will report back. Five years of Spanish in high school and virtually no knowledge of anything Basque won't qualify me to make any connections with this music and associated speech patterns, but I'm always up for listening to music I haven't heard before.

And so here's a fun story about W.A. Mozart. It's supposed to be true, but when he was a young boy, his mother had put him to bed. In the other room, his father was playing or practicing on the (pianoforte, harpsichord, I don't know which). His father, upon finishing his practice, ended the piece he was playing on an unresolved chord. Wolfgang Amadeus is supposed to have gotten up out of bed, run into the other room, played the final chord resolving the chord progression before returning to bed.

Don't ask me why that stuff sticks in my mind. Nor why I feel the need to write it down. But tonight your log is the target of one of my mental misfires....
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Iversen
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 Message 1468 of 3959
05 November 2009 at 10:02am | IP Logged 
Before you start listening to Sarasate I would say that he was one of a series of composer-violinists, but due to the melodious character of his music one of the more durable. Another name that springs to mind is the Pole H.Wieniawski, but of course the best known of the bunch is the somewhat earlier Italian Paganini. To really appreciate the works of this people it is not a bad thing to know something about violin technique, but a number of composers who could write difficult, but not memorable music have been utterly forgotten today.

Sometimes these composers seem so intent upon including dazzling violinistic pyrotechnics that any melody seems to be there just to add sugar upon the demonstration of technical abiliy, - but Sarasate can be difficult without losing the musical thread.

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Hobbema
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 Message 1469 of 3959
05 November 2009 at 4:56pm | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:

Sometimes these composers seem so intent upon including dazzling violinistic pyrotechnics that any melody seems to be there just to add sugar upon the demonstration of technical abiliy, - but Sarasate can be difficult without losing the musical thread.


I’m sure you know, Paganini played so well he was rumored as having sold his soul to the devil.   If I remember right, he had some unusual physical attributes which aided his talent, I just can’t remember what they were. He has an interesting biography.   And the American guitarist Robert Johnson is supposed to have sold his soul to the devil as well, in exchange for mastery of the Delta blues. Interesting stories, but your point is well taken that virtuosic ability can be a distraction to the music behind it.

You mentioned a piece’s technical difficulty overshadowing melody and the music, and how Sarasate is able to maintain the right balance. (Would you agree that Franz Liszt is another example of that)? Still I look forward to listening, as a little bit of awe can add to the enjoyment.   

From our excellent public library system I have reserved Jascha Heifetz performing Sarasate’s Zigeunerweisen and Zapateado.

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Iversen
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 Message 1470 of 3959
05 November 2009 at 7:02pm | IP Logged 
Paganini was said to have extraordinary long and flexible fingers.

Franz Liszt was the most important of his generation of superpianists, and in his youth the virtuosity was more conspicuous in his works. If you want to hear something from this phase then try the 12 Etudes transcendentales (one of these, Mazeppa, is also available for orchestra). But he developed into a more complete and complex artist - in my humble opinion one of the towering figures in the 1800s. And in his latest pianoworks he almost dropped tonality, - but I prefer his early and middle works. Other prominent composer-pianists like Thalberg and Henselt are almost forgotten nowadays because they didn't evolve their style beyond the wellwrought display of virtuosity. However I do like to listen even to their works, in so far I can find them. Btw. you can listen to much of this music for free at the internet, for instance at Youtube. I have not quite understood how this can be legal, but it seems that the copyright holders have grudgingly accepted the new world order.

FR: J'ai lu encore quelques chapitres dans mon livre sur le Géorgien, et maintenant je suis arrivé aux chapitres sur les verbes. Il parait que l'organisation des membres de la phrase sont indiquée dans le verbe par l'emploi de préfixes, dont la voyelle indique le person (1,2,3). Juste comme on peut regarder les terminaisons des noms Géorgiens correspondant aux cas comme des prépositions (ou plutôt postpositions) et les terminaisons des verbes comme des traces de verbes auxiliaires, on peut voir ces préfixes qui indique les rôles des objets directs et indirects comme des pseudo-pronoms engloutis. À crai dire, le livre ne dit pas que c'est ainsi, mais c'est comme j'ai interprété les données.

-----

I have read some more in my Georgian book, which effectively is a grammar and not a textbook as I thought when I bought it. Now I have reached the chapter about the verbs, and I have noticed that Georgian verbs not only have endings telling you the person, number and tempus, but they also a prefixes that indicate person and number of direct or indirect objects. I imagine them as vestigial pronouns that have been goobled up by the verbs, but of course I have no idea about the development that led to these prefixes.


Edited by Iversen on 05 November 2009 at 7:17pm

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Hobbema
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 Message 1471 of 3959
06 November 2009 at 6:49am | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:
Paganini was said to have extraordinary long and flexible fingers.

Franz Liszt was the most important of his generation of superpianists, and in his youth the virtuosity was more conspicuous in his works. If you want to hear something from this phase then try the 12 Etudes transcendentales (one of these, Mazeppa, is also available for orchestra). But he developed into a more complete and complex artist - in my humble opinion one of the towering figures in the 1800s. And in his latest pianoworks he almost dropped tonality, - but I prefer his early and middle works. Other prominent composer-pianists like Thalberg and Henselt are almost forgotten nowadays because they didn't evolve their style beyond the wellwrought display of virtuosity. However I do like to listen even to their works, in so far I can find them. Btw. you can listen to much of this music for free at the internet, for instance at Youtube. I have not quite understood how this can be legal, but it seems that the copyright holders have grudgingly accepted the new world order.



I am very much enjoying your insights, and you have brought up many things I don't know. For instance, I am familiar with several popular Liszt pieces, but I do not have any idea of the historical/biographical context you wrote above. I want you to take me seriously when I say that I believe this has great value to a listener. I myself am making an (admittedly slow) study of the nine Ralph Vaughan Williams symphonies, trying to understand their historical references and placing them in his biography, and it all adds to the enjoyment of listening to them time and time and time again.

But the freaky circus sideshow part of me wants to ask about things like Paganini's double jointed fingers, and I also wanted to ask you if you had heard a legend about Liszt, because I heard (and have not read anywhere) that he had the webbing between his fingers surgically cut for the purpose of increasing the reach on the piano of his fingers, but since that didn't work out as well as he planned, he turned to more composing instead. Gruesome, true. But no worse than Van Gogh cutting off his ear, I suppose...

Congratulations on your English, by the way. I would swear you speak it better than most Americans.

Edited by Hobbema on 06 November 2009 at 6:53am

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pohaku
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 Message 1472 of 3959
06 November 2009 at 7:59am | IP Logged 
Regarding Paganini, check out this blog:

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/alexross/

and look--and listen--to the entry for Oct 28, 2009: Thomas Zehetmair playing Paganini. Incredible!

Hobbema, did you know that Liszt was Wagner's father-in-law?


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