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Iversen’s Multiconfused Log (see p.1!)

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mick33
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 Message 2473 of 3959
20 June 2011 at 8:13am | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:
Most of the words on that homepage aren't really new words - they are old and dusty words used by scholars who wanted to show that they once upon a time had studied Latin and Greek, and now they have been collected by people who revel in human weirdness

PS: you must also know "lama"? The word for those guys in red clothes in Buddhist temples in the Himalayas?
Some of the words in the first list have probably featured in the advanced levels of spelling bees, but otherwise they are too obscure to be useful.

Now that I look at the list again, I do know the word "lama", I must have missed it the first time.
Kuikentje wrote:
yes, I agree, how can they don't know for example labiodental, lachrymal, lacuna, laic, ladrone, etc All the world know those words. I've seen some other letters' lists also, and many words are well-known, but nevertheless it's a great website. Have you seen ones for some other languages?
I actually had to look up "ladrone" in a dictionary because I had never seen it or heard of it. According to my Webster's dictionary, the word "ladrone" is (or was) used in the Southwestern U.S. and means thief. Are there cognates in other languages?

I also looked up "lachrymal" even though I already knew it, and discovered an alternate spelling "lacrimal". The alternate spelling is easier to spell and definitely more phonetic, but I still prefer the "ch" and the "y".
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newyorkeric
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 Message 2474 of 3959
20 June 2011 at 10:07am | IP Logged 
mick33 wrote:
I actually had to look up "ladrone" in a dictionary because I had never seen it or heard of it. According to my Webster's dictionary, the word "ladrone" is (or was) used in the Southwestern U.S. and means thief. Are there cognates in other languages?


Yes, it's Italian for thief.
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Iversen
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 Message 2476 of 3959
20 June 2011 at 2:30pm | IP Logged 
Newyorkeric wrote:
Yes, it's Italian for thief.

Kuikentje wrote:
and Spanish.
laic /laicity is the basis of the politic /government / society in for example France, and often discussed.
lachry- or lacry- is about the tears, weeping etc
I thought that they are well-known, but now I can see that it's the cognates which help, for example in French, Spanish, Italian.



The cognates may even help in the sense that they make it easier to remember specific words. However in my lists on the preceding page I put some words under "dunno" even though I could guess their meaning - for instance "laches" from French "lâche" or "lactareum" for a place where you can buy milk (strange ... I didn't see that place in Pompei).

Sometimes it is actually difficult to be sure that you know a word and don't just guess it, but with really preposterous words I normally have some idea where I might have seen them. The problem is the more 'grey' and common ones.

Edited by Iversen on 14 September 2011 at 12:11am

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meramarina
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 Message 2477 of 3959
20 June 2011 at 4:36pm | IP Logged 
Quote:
really preposterous words


Oh no, this a a bad sign, now you're playing with formatting! Too much time spent here, maybe?

I recognize a lot of those words or parts of them from studying medical terminology a few years ago. I remember getting very, very angry once when someone told me it was not possible for me to pass a test on this subject without taking a special course. I checked the course requirements and there were long lessons about things like "What is a prefix"? And no way was I going to pay a thousand dollars for the silly class when I'd already taught myself as much as possible. It was a requirement for coding certification, but I moved on to other things.
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Iversen
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 Message 2478 of 3959
21 June 2011 at 2:46am | IP Logged 
Around midnight I watched a horror movie on Danish TV: a program in the series "Frontline" about the way the present economical crises started. But it was in English and it was about politics, so I'm not going to comment on it.

LAT: Ut questioni Caintearri de pronuntiatione litterae 'c' sententiam dicere ego media nocte texta super Latinam vulgarem legi - sine certior fieri de rationibus opinionis quod omnes romani classici semper /k/ duram dicerent. Certe indicia satis habimus quod romani cultu ita facebant, at plebs? Hic dicitur quod caesar Claudius de correctionibus orthographiae Latinae cogitaret, sed ipse imperator romanus non propere hic evenit.

I have been reading and copying texts in a number of languages this evening:

ESP: En Esperanto mi studis mallongan biografion de la Dana poeto Oehlenschläger, kiu interalie skribis "Guldhornene" ("la oraj cornoj"), kiu estas fariĝitan melodramon kun musiko de IPE Hartmann. 'Melodramo' estas parola teksto kun akompananto muzika. La fonto heredodana ankaŭ enhavas traduko de ĉi tiu poemo, kaj jes havas rimojn, sed mi preferas pli precizan tradukon sen rimoj. Kaj kiu estas la oraj cornoj? Ili estis faritajn en la Germana periodo, eble ĉirkaŭ 200 AC, kaj la plej mallonga korno havis ĉi tiu surskribo "ek hlewagastiR holtijaR horna tawido " (mi Hlawagastir de Holte kornon faris) - unu el la plej fruaj surskriboj en iu Ĝermanida lingvo. Bedaŭrinde ŝtelisto ilin ŝtelis kaj fandis.

BA I: Dalam Bahasa, saya membaca artikel berita dari Jakarta mediasi online, misalnya satu pemakaman politisi dituduh korupsi serius menyangkal bahwa ia telah telah menerima suap. Ha ha.

GR: Και στην ελληνική γλώσσα, διάβασα ένα άρθρο για το διαδίκτυο και τα παιδιά στην Ελλάδα.

meramarina wrote:
...there were long lessons about things like "What is a prefix"? And no way was I going to pay a thousand dollars for the silly class when I'd already taught myself as much as possible....


That certification is apparently primarily there to make money for a school. And having "what is a prefix" as a specific subject on the study plan suggests that the level of the course is abysmally low.

Edited by Iversen on 21 June 2011 at 10:13am

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Iversen
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 Message 2479 of 3959
21 June 2011 at 9:50am | IP Logged 
Last night I made some comments in the thread Latin C&G with I&E, where one of the main points was that it might be worth looking into Vulgar Latin to see whether the distinction between hard 'k' and soft 'c' in Archaic Latin somehow could be traced into Vulgar Latin from the Classical period (in spite of reasonably good evidence that at least cultivated Latin had the hard pronunciation of 'c' in all positions. If there hadn't been a difference in pronunciation in Archaic Latin then it is difficult to see why the first Romans took over two different letters from Etruscan instead of just one. But it is equally hard to see how soft c in front of i and e could develop in a uniformal way all over the immense Roman empire if it hadn't already been present in some kinds of Latin already before the big expansion.

Well, let's see what happens in that thread. However it caused me to spend a fair amount of time reading about Vulgar Latin and looking at the few original specimina. One of the more interesting finds was the travelogue of a (presumably) Spanish nun from (presumably) the end of the 4. century - with comments that elucidate elements in the text that points forward to the Romance languages.

LAT: Bene, videmus quid in hae fila accidet. Ut dixi supra specimina Latinae vulgaris heri nocte studiavi, et igitur aliquid de peregrinatione monachae Aetheriae cognovi. Modo copia italica medievalia nunc extat, sed appareat quod ut inter 363 et 540 textum originale scriptum est. Monacha illa inter alia Aegyptum, Siriam Palestinamque visitavit, et in parte relationis in interreto proferta apud montem sanctum Dei Syna est - ego non scio quid montem sit, at se excutinem Google utens executo, modo sermonem Aetheriae ac texta Neo-Noruegica invenio ("dei syna" in sermone Neo-Noruegica "illi demonstrant" significat, exempli gratia "Kva tid skal dei syna mannsmot?" - "Quando audaciam ostendant?"). Sed locum texti "filii Israhel commorati sunt his diebus, quod sanctus Moyses ascendit in montem Domini, et fuit ibi quadraginta diebus et quadraginta noctibus" insussurat quod de Monte Sinai rei agitur - et ego adhuc non illic fui.


Edited by Iversen on 14 August 2013 at 12:49pm

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Iversen
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 Message 2480 of 3959
23 June 2011 at 2:51am | IP Logged 
I spent some time this evening making a video about the six interviews which Claude Cartaginese (Syzygycc) and David Mansaray have had with a number of accomplished polyglots, including some who have been writing here at HTLAL.

Besides I have updated the homepage of my travel club, and I returned late from my job.

Under these circumstances there isn't much to tell about my language learning this evening - excapt maybe that I have done the repetition parts of some Polish wordlists and watched TV in Spanish, German and English. Reading about personality types in English can hardly be called language learning.

Edited by Iversen on 23 June 2011 at 2:53am



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