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Iversen’s Multiconfused Log (see p.1!)

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Fasulye
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 Message 1097 of 3959
12 July 2009 at 8:57pm | IP Logged 
The contents of the survey are confidential. So I will not write anything about that. I took the survey about polyglottery yesterday. I would appreciate, if Dr. Erard did further testing with polyglots of his choice, for example I personally would like to take a standard language aptitute test and a reliable IQ-test. I think that he is now waiting to see how many polyglots of this forum are willing to participate in the survey. As I have a general interest in science exploration and especially on the topic of polyglottery, which has to do with my own person, I will closely follow the further developments.

Fasulye

Edited by Fasulye on 12 July 2009 at 9:00pm

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Fasulye
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 Message 1098 of 3959
12 July 2009 at 9:11pm | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:
This time it is a Danish comedy written in 1633 by the school master Hieronymus Justesen Ranch: Karrig Nidding ('miserly no-good'). I have not yet found the original text on the internet (only a remark about it being too difficult for pupils at our 'gymnasium' level (high school/Gymnasium/lycée) - which is hard to understand because my generation could read it around 1970). It has however been presented on Danish TV with a now long-dead actor called Olaf Ussing in the title role. He was a very short and stocky person, and I have used his body as the model for the upside-down person to the right. The plot is roughly that once upon a time there was a rich man that was so stingy that his whole family had to run around begging for money. One day while he was away a stranger arrived and talked his wife into opening all the coffins and having one hell of a party. When the skinflint returned he couldn't recognize his own house, and his wife pretended to be married to the smooth-talking stranger. So he and his servant had to turn around and walk away, this time as genuine beggars.


Your paintings are colourful and very complex. You have to give lectures to enable the audience to understand the meaning of your paintings. But perhaps this is typical for surrealism, because as I remember the paintings of Salvador Dalí, they are also quite complex.

Fasulye

Edited by Fasulye on 12 July 2009 at 9:13pm

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Iversen
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 Message 1099 of 3959
12 July 2009 at 9:28pm | IP Logged 
Surrealism looks complex, and there is often quite a lot of details in such pictures. That's why I like to look at them.

There's more underway!

----

SW: Karl Gustav Johan Snoilsky var en svensk poet som levde från 1841 till 1903. Det finns delar från flera av hans dikter i bilden, men burkarna till höger är lätta att hitta: de hänvisar till en dikt om August den Stärka (?) av Sachsen, som bytade en hel härenhet bort för några porslinkrukor:

Gammalt porslin

En kung i Sachsen samlade porslin,
men samlingsvurmen blev en riktig sjuka.
Han bytte bort till kungen i Berlin
sitt garde—tänk—mot en kinesisk kruka.
....
Sen bytet gjordes, har ett sekel svunnit:
femhundra tappra hjärtan brista hunnit,
den gamla krukan—hon står ännu bi.



Count Snoilsky was a Swedish poet who lived from 1841 till 1903. Once again there are elements from several dpoems in this picture, but at least the pots to the right are easy to pinpoint: they come from a poem about a king of Saxony who got a Chinese porcelain wase from the king in Berlin (Prussia) in exchange for 500 soldiers. Snoilsky's point was that the pot was still there when the 500 soldiers had died. My meek reply is that it was the king of Berlin - not his collegue in Dresden - who became the emperor of a Untied* Germany somewhat later in the world history. Though as anyone knows the empire lasted only to 1918, while the Chinese pottery still can be seen in "Grünes Gewölbe' in Dresden. So maybe the king of Saxony was the wiser one after all.    

* should be 'united', but the error is somehow symbolic

Edited by Iversen on 13 July 2009 at 1:04pm

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Iversen
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 Message 1100 of 3959
12 July 2009 at 9:48pm | IP Logged 
NO: Det er vist tid for et bilde mer.

"Det Myke Landskapet" er en science fiction roman fra 1970 av Jon Bing, og det er noe med kasinoer og slikt, og til slutt blir alting vist til et enkelt stort ansikte, og alt er svært komplisert og skrevet på nynorsk, - jeg har ikke lest boken siden en gang i syttitallet, så jeg husker ikke myket av handlingen.



Time for one more, this time a SF novel in (new) Norwegian from 1970 and written by Jon Bing. It was a very complicated little thing, which ended up with everything being just a big soft face somewhere, and frankly I don't remember much of the plot after more than 30 years. But casinos certainly were mentioned somewhere in the book, otherwise I wouldn't have painted them here.

PS: the man at the typewriter with the funnel on his head is Mr. Bing getting inspiration from above.


Edited by Iversen on 13 July 2009 at 11:30am

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Iversen
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 Message 1101 of 3959
13 July 2009 at 4:19pm | IP Logged 
I was just about to leave my office desk, but then I surfed a little and found a site called fora.tv. I looked for something on languages and found this lecture by the man Everett, who introduced the Piraha language to the world. And of course I have read about it before, but it was fascinating to hear the man himself tell about this subject. For your information the 300 piraha or so live in the Amazonas jungle, and they are said (by Everett) to have a language - and culture - without things like perfect tenses, numbers and recursion. And mentioning this in the USA where the universals of Chomsky have become sacrosanct is like denying the existence of God in a Midwestern church. By the way, the Pirahas have spirits, but no God. There are suffixes that tell from where you have your information. If you have seen something then you have one suffix, another if somebody you know has seen it, period. So they took Mr. Everett to task: have you seen Jesus? No. Have your father seen Jesus? No. Has any of your friends seen Jesus? No. OK, why do you then talk about Jesus? Mr. Everett went there as a missionary, but he left as a nonbeliever, bereft of his illusions.

Then he tried to elicit the words for 1, 2 eller possible even more numbers, followed by a word for many. But he got different results depending on whether he started from the top or from the bottom (1), and he had to conclude that there is a word for a small amount (compared to something else), another for a heap, and a third word for something in between.

And recursion (the thing we use when we take a sentence and put it inside another either as a subordinate or as a phrase based upon an infinite verbform) - not in this language. When he published this the whole Chomsky school tried to convince him that he was either lying or mistaken or incompetent, but having read about this culture and now hearing the lecture I have have my own little theory confirmed, namely that a ultraconfomplicated confusologistic hyperscientific system like transformational grammar produces it own non-existant artefacts, which are then presented as god's own truth. It is refreshing to see some little man puncture such a myth, - especially when he clearly knows what he is talking about.

This lecture also gave an insider's view on learning a language from scratch without the help of an intermediary language:

Stick: Eh
Stick falling to the ground: Eh meke cawli
..
and so on for 30 years.


Edited by Iversen on 13 July 2009 at 9:59pm

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Iversen
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 Message 1102 of 3959
13 July 2009 at 9:50pm | IP Logged 
FR: .. après quoi nous allons visiter encore une fois ma galérie personelle. Cette fois c'est un livre en Ancien Français: "La Quêste dou Saint Graal", qui est attribuée à Gautier Map (XIIIe siècle), aka "le roman de Perceval". Il y a une traduction incomplète en Français moderne ici, mais il vaut la peine de lire la version originale ici:

La Queste del saint Graal
        Quant Perceval a grant piece dormi, si s’esveille et
        demande a mengier; et ele comande que la table soit
        mise, et l’en la met. Et il resgarde que l’en la cuevre de
        tele plenté de mes que ce n’est se merveilles non.

C'est pas très difficile, non?

Il faut peut-être avouer que ceci n'est point le roman Arthurien le plus connu, - ça doit être l'ouevre magistrale de Chrétien de Troyes: "Perceval, le Conte du Graal" (écrite entre 1181 et 1191). L'ensemble des soi-disant romans Arthuriens mélange deux thèmes: celui du roi Anglais Arthus et ses chevaliers de la Table Reonde et celui d'une quête du Saint Graal, qui serait une chalice utilisée par Joseph d'Arimathée pour contenir le sang de Jésus-Christ. Les philologues ont eu beaucoup de problèmes à établir l'origine du mot même de "graal". Ici j'ai suivi ceux qui croient qu'un graal était à l'origine un plat pour servir des poissons, parce que c'est le propos le plus inattendu.

Chaque auteur a participé à faire une histoire extrêmement compliqué, et même le compositeur allemand Richard Wagner a basé une opéra, Parsifal, sur ces balivernes médiévales. Mr. Wagner se retrouve sur la peinture comme la buste verte.



Once more we visit my private art gallery. This time the painting has taken its motives from one of the Old French Arthurean novels, - for once not the most famous (Chrétien de Troyes: "Perceval, le Conte du Graal"), but one of the follow-ups: "La Queste del saint Graal", whose autorship is disputed, but Gautier Map is the most common suggestion (13. century). Richard Wagner is the green bust to the right, because his opera Parsifal - which is immensely long and soporific - is based on themes from this book. King Arthur and his 12 knight are sitting and quarreling around the round table to the lower left, while the angles come flying with the Holy grail in the shape of a charger with a big fish. And no, I didn't invent this - this is a serious proposal for the original meaning of the French word 'Graal' (which essentially had nothing at all to do with the old Pre-Anglosaxon king Arthus before some French auteurs brought the two incongruous myths complexes together). If this sounds a bit complicated, then try to understand the plot of the original works - or that of mr. sleeping-pill Wagner!


Edited by Iversen on 13 July 2009 at 11:19pm

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Fasulye
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 Message 1103 of 3959
13 July 2009 at 9:58pm | IP Logged 
Iversen, quelles mesures ont tes peintures en réalité et comment tu les digitalises? C'est compliqué ou beaucoup de travail de faire ça?

Fasulye
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Iversen
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 Message 1104 of 3959
13 July 2009 at 10:02pm | IP Logged 
Fasulye wrote:
Iversen, quelles mesures ont tes peintures en réalité et comment tu les digitalises? C'est compliqué ou beaucoup de travail de faire ça?

Fasulye


Je les ai photographiées, et leur mesures sont d'environ 40 x 32 cm. J'aurais préféré faire des peintures plus grandes (ou même grandioses), mais avec un budget extrèmement limité et trop peu d'espace au foyer cela n'était pas possible.

Et maintenant deux autre peintures sur des thèmes littéraires Françaises, mais qui ne font pas partie de la série 'littéraire' proprement dite. L'une était fait avant la série, l'autre après. Nous allons commencer avec le poème le plus connu de Gérard de Nerval, qui était un poète pauvre et atteint d'une maladie nerveuse, - probablement la schizophrénie. Le poème s'intitule El Desdichado, et il commence ainsi:

Je suis le Ténébreux, - le Veuf, - l'Inconsolé,
Le Prince d'Aquitaine à la Tour abolie :
Ma seule Etoile est morte, - et mon luth constellé
Porte le Soleil noir de la Mélancolie.

J'ai oublié de 'consteller' son luth, mais on voit le prince d'Aquitaine et le soleil noir de la mélancolie et l'étoile morte. Pendant mes études il fallait écrire des devoirs sur des thèmes littéraires, et j'ai fait une analyse presque mathématique de ce poème-ci. Or la prof était parmi les personnes qui ne comprennent pas une pensée logique, mais qui adorait les analyses psychanalystes et psychologisantes. Quand elle voyait cette analyse strictement structurale elle l'ai comparé à la seule analyse structuraliste elle connaissait, celle des Chats de Roman Jakobson, et parce que mon texte n'était pas fait exactement sur le model de Jakobson elle l'a rejete. Aucun problème, j'ai fait une autre analyse chez un autre prof, - mais je me suis vengé d'une manière subtile: j'ai publié le devoir rejeté dans la périodique de notre institut, ou il a été beaucoup loué, même par les autres profs. Au point que j'ai du expliquer à plusieurs étudiants plus jeunes qu'il n'était pas une bonne idée de baser des devoirs pour Mme XXX sur mon analyse.



This painting is only my no. 7 in the surrealistic style, so it may be a bit primitive. It takes its motif from the most famous poem 'El Desdichado' of the French poet Gerard de Nerval, who not only was as poor as most of his collegues, but also mad as a hatter.

Je suis le Ténébreux, - le Veuf, - l'Inconsolé,
I am the dark (/mysterious,shadowy) - the widower - the un-consoled

Le Prince d'Aquitaine à la Tour abolie :
The prince of Aquitaine of the deserted tower

Ma seule Etoile est morte, - et mon luth constellé
my only star is dead - and my starry lute

Porte le Soleil noir de la Mélancolie.
carries the black sun of melancholy.

While I was still studying French in the 70s I had to write some literary essays for a teacher who loved psychoanalysis and psychological complications and all that... and I wrote a structuralist analysis of the spatial distributions of elements from different semantic fields in this poem. She peered into the only structuralistic analysis she knew (by a certain Roman Jacobson), but it looked different so she rejected my text. No problem, I just wrote another for another teacher, but I took my revenge by publishing the rejected paper in our institute magazine where it got many meritorious remarks from teachers and students at the instute. I even had to warn some younger students against taking it as a model for papers that were to be submitted to Mme XXX. She would have let the guillotine fall mercilessly on their sinful heads.


Edited by Iversen on 14 July 2009 at 1:01am



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